AustLit logo
y separately published work icon Meanjin periodical issue  
Issue Details: First known date: 2020... vol. 79 no. 2 June 2020 of Meanjin est. 1940 Meanjin
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The pandemic is a portal, Arundhati Roy wrote in early March, ‘a gateway between one world and the next’. We are yet to enter that next world, nor can we clearly see its shape from here. For now we are filled with one numbing certainty: the sad sense that the world we left behind as the coronavirus took hold is closed to us now, much as we might hanker for it, much as daily life is still formed around our memory of what it really ought to be.' (Jonathan Green, Editorial introduction)

Notes

  • Contents indexed selectively.

Contents

* Contents derived from the 2020 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Shattering the Neoliberal Fairytale, Angela Smith , single work column (p. 1-4)
Sage Tea, Spices and Spaces, Amal Awad , single work column
'It was a random post on social media, but it unexpectedly moved me: a woman asking, for research purposes, what is something your mother can do that you cannot? There are many in my case, but my instant response was: I can’t cook like my mother. Soon followed a deeper realisation: I wish I could cook like my mother.' (Introduction)
(p. 4-6)
Unpacking Home : Thoughts of a Displaced Traveller, Lisa Morrow , single work column
'I’ve worked as a teacher of English as a foreign and second language for many years and know how to teach the difference between the word ‘house’ and the word ‘home’. I teach that the former is a structure made from concrete or bricks, mortar or wood, while home is a conceptual idea of place and belonging. I can say with certainty that one provides the protection of a solid and quantifiable shelter, but I can’t be as unequivocal about the other. The longer I live outside my country of birth, the further I move away from understanding. I have become unstuck because I have no useful comprehension of the meaning of the word ‘home’ anymore. I can arm myself with synonyms such as ‘nation’, ‘family’, ‘familiarity’ or ‘being at ease’, but these words are purely academic.' (Introduction)
(p. 7-9)
Breaking the Compassion Drought, Ginger Gorman , single work column
'The term ‘radical empathy’ found me. I didn’t go looking for it. Seemingly innocuous at first, these two words metamorphosed into a kind of prolonged sliding-doors moment; my thinking changed forever. This is the power of a name, a phrase that offers a beacon of hope, a solid nugget of meaning. It’s a winding path away from all-consuming rage, hatred and violence.' (Introduction)
(p. 9-13)
Australia in Three Books, Winnie Siulolovao Dunn , single work review
— Review of Always Another Country : A Memoir of Exile and Home Sisonke Msimang , 2018 single work autobiography ; The White Girl Tony Birch , 2019 single work novel ;
(p. 14-17)
Ghostedi"In this wet night we walk our antique dog through mistletoe gums.", Allis Hamilton , single work (p. 16)
If You Choose to Stay, We May Not Be Able to Save You, Sophie Cunningham , single work essay
'Towards the end of last year, a friend and I sent each other emails full of the thoughts you try not to give voice to. If we were going to be preppers, where would we choose to live? If we bought a block of land in the country, where would we buy? Personally, I’ve always been keen on East Gippsland. The conversation continued. Should we be more concerned about rising sea levels, drought or bushfire? Were we planning on growing vegetables? Keeping chooks? My friend worried about what to say to their children. How bad could it be, we wondered. Bad, we decided. When it happens, my friend added, it’s going to happen quickly.' (Introduction)
(p. 18-25)
Writing the Apocalypse, Lucy Treloar , single work essay
‘' It’s like the apocalypse out there.’ How many times I heard it said in the summer, in the bushfire season. The exclamatory tone of the early months made way for weariness in January, and desperate humour by early autumn as floods, brown rain, the COVID-19 virus and the great toilet paper crisis of the first weeks of March replaced drought and fire.' (Introduction)
(p. 26-36)
On Happinessi"History recognises Turun Söl as a standard disappointment in the ancient practice of poetry", Maria Takolander , single work poetry (p. 37)
The Velvet Plain, Adam Ouston , single work short story (p. 42-47)
Plastic Nightsi"I’m lurking at home and thinking of Ashbery,", Peter Rose , single work poetry (p. 45)
Hidden in Plain Sight, Claire G. Coleman , single work autobiography
'This is a difficult piece to write. It cuts closer to the bone than most of what I have written; closer to my bones, through my blood and flesh to the bones of truth and country. There is truth here, not disguised but in the open, and that truth hurts. As I caress the truth with my blood and bones I find it increasingly hard to breathe. At the core is a discussion I had with my dad, Graham Coleman, a Noongar man and a member of what some of us have come to call the ‘Hidden Generation’' (Introduction)
(p. 58-61)
Another, Familiar Centuryi"A scene from Faulkner, maybe.", John Mateer , single work poetry (p. 62-63)
Silence and Light, Carol Lefevre , single work essay
'Painting is a silent art, yet so few artists have mastered silence—in Australia, Jeffrey Smart; in America, Edward Hopper; and in Denmark, Vilhelm Hammershøi. If I do not dwell on Smart it is because I sense his debt to Hopper; Smart was born and raised in Adelaide, and though I have wanted him to win my love he has only won my admiration. Hopper, though, crept into my consciousness more than half a lifetime ago, and while I have not spent every moment of those years thinking about his paintings, it is impossible to imagine my life without them.' (Introduction)
(p. 64-71)
Endlings : An Essay-poem, or, Australian Extinctions since 1788, Toby Fitch , single work prose (p. 72-78)
Arcades Project, Michael Farrell , single work poetry (p. 79)
Time in the Antipodes, Fatima Measham , single work essay
'The past is not a fixed object. It recedes when you land in another country, falling back further as you get married, have children, change jobs, move house. I was 23 when I left for Melbourne. I will always be 23 to those who last knew me in the Philippines.' (Introduction)
(p. 80-85)
Scales, Rebecca Slater , single work short story (p. 86-90)
Peacekeepingi"The van is bone white", Robyn Rowland , single work poetry
i.m. Nermin Divović, Sarajevo. 18 Nov. 1994. File photo
(p. 91)
A Self-governing Literature : Who Owns the Map of the World?, Alexis Wright , single work essay
'The imaginative literary mind is as boundless as it is borderless and bountiful in its way, finding ways of powerfully creating anew the already imagined with the unimagined or unimaginable. Possibly George Orwell had thought something like this when he explained that the imagination was like certain wild animals that do not breed in captivity, and that writers who denied this fact were in effect demanding their own destruction.1 The dreamlike state of imagining is continuously curious while it shifts and reshapes its positioning and influences. But imagination is never alone. There is a fight going on all day long in the mind of the writer about how to counterbalance the fanciful world of the imagination.' (Introduction)
(p. 92-101)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Disparities and Delights : Meanjin's Winter Issue Elizabeth Bryer , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 423 2020; (p. 67)

— Review of Meanjin vol. 79 no. 2 June 2020 periodical issue
Jonathan Green (ed.) Meanjin, Winter 2020 Fiona Wright , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 11-17 July 2020;

— Review of Meanjin vol. 79 no. 2 June 2020 periodical issue

'There’s a strange elasticity of time at play in the latest issue of Meanjin, which seems fitting, perhaps, for the particular moment in which we find ourselves, unmoored from our regular habits and lives, newly conscious of our place in history. Many of the pieces within its pages were clearly written in the early months of this year – such is the nature of lead times in publishing – and are concerned with the horrors of the past summer: the devastating fires that destroyed massive amounts of bushland and habitat and choked cities with smoke for weeks; our politicians’ failure to properly respond. And then a new crisis emerged, and in many ways eclipsed this, because of the immediacy with which it affected all of our lives, and the profundity of the change. It’s evident that a good number of the pieces have been rapidly updated to reflect this, to begin to grapple with what an event such as the coronavirus might mean, as seen from the vantage point of the early days of the pandemic. Jonathan Green’s opening editorial explicitly speaks to this “moment of such extraordinary and irreversible disruption” where “all that seemed so solidly certain [has been] made tremulous and thin”. So the issue as a whole feels almost like a time capsule, a reminder of what the world was like before we knew precisely how it would change.' (Introduction)

Jonathan Green (ed.) Meanjin, Winter 2020 Fiona Wright , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 11-17 July 2020;

— Review of Meanjin vol. 79 no. 2 June 2020 periodical issue

'There’s a strange elasticity of time at play in the latest issue of Meanjin, which seems fitting, perhaps, for the particular moment in which we find ourselves, unmoored from our regular habits and lives, newly conscious of our place in history. Many of the pieces within its pages were clearly written in the early months of this year – such is the nature of lead times in publishing – and are concerned with the horrors of the past summer: the devastating fires that destroyed massive amounts of bushland and habitat and choked cities with smoke for weeks; our politicians’ failure to properly respond. And then a new crisis emerged, and in many ways eclipsed this, because of the immediacy with which it affected all of our lives, and the profundity of the change. It’s evident that a good number of the pieces have been rapidly updated to reflect this, to begin to grapple with what an event such as the coronavirus might mean, as seen from the vantage point of the early days of the pandemic. Jonathan Green’s opening editorial explicitly speaks to this “moment of such extraordinary and irreversible disruption” where “all that seemed so solidly certain [has been] made tremulous and thin”. So the issue as a whole feels almost like a time capsule, a reminder of what the world was like before we knew precisely how it would change.' (Introduction)

Disparities and Delights : Meanjin's Winter Issue Elizabeth Bryer , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 423 2020; (p. 67)

— Review of Meanjin vol. 79 no. 2 June 2020 periodical issue
Last amended 8 Jul 2020 07:23:23
X