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y separately published work icon Cultural Justice & the Right to Thrive single work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 2018... 2018 Cultural Justice & the Right to Thrive
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'What are cultural rights and why do we need them? In the author’s words, ‘Everyone, everywhere has a right to thrive.’ It is an issue of justice, an essential service like education, health. Culture is not benign, he says. It is a powerful narrative contagion which binds us together. We need to pay attention to it and be vigilant, not for the few but the whole. Because if we don’t it can be used against certain sections of our society, demonising them or rendering their story invisible and citizens vulnerable. In Australia we pride ourselves on our cultural diversity but have little self-knowledge. This paper draws from Rankin’s 26 years’ experience living with Big hART, a regional performance company and digital content producer based in Burnie, ‘the poorest electorate in Australia’, that uses the arts and performance to stimulate social development and better cultural understanding. He reflects on the lessons learnt from their successes and failures; and places their body of work in an international context of alternative company practice.' (Publication summary)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Strawberry Hills, Inner Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales,: Currency House , 2018 .
      image of person or book cover 4852283211720650780.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: vi, 76 pp.
      Note/s:
      • Published November 2018
      ISBN: 9780648426509
      Series: y separately published work icon Platform Papers Currency Press (publisher), Strawberry Hills : Currency Press , 2004- Z1171343 2004 series - publisher 'A quarterly publication (January, April, July and October) on an issue affecting the health of the performing arts.' Number in series: 57

Works about this Work

[Review Essay] Cultural Justice and the Right to Thrive Mary Ann Hunter , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Australasian Drama Studies , October no. 75 2019; (p. 353-359)

— Review of Cultural Justice & the Right to Thrive Scott Rankin , 2018 single work criticism

'Article 27 of the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights is unequivocal in its claim that culture is central to human dignity and identity. Projects such as Ngapartji Ngapartji, Acoustic Life of Sheds, Project O and Namatjira are 'large-scale, long-term, process-based' partnerships with 'high-needs communities' (25) that intend to go beyond nationally circumscribed ideas about capital 'C' Culture to engage with communities whose stories have been systematically silenced, sidelined, buried or dismissed. Since Big hART's beginning as an arts-based project in Burnie, a community deeply affected by the closure of a paper mill in north-west Tasmania, Big hART has partnered with over fifty communities across Australia and toured its works in theatre, music and film, internationally. Testimony providing evidence of the personal, social and language-recovery outcomes of Big hART's work is affecting, making the impact of Rankin's call for cultural justice speak all the more persuasively as it relates to practice on multiple platforms to multiple audiences. Equally important to the communication of these impacts in this essay is the description of Big hART's five foundational principles or 'domains of change' (15): with individuals and communities (who are supported for at least 150 weeks), with the nation, with art and content, and with knowledge and learning.' (Publication abstract)

[Review Essay] Cultural Justice and the Right to Thrive Mary Ann Hunter , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Australasian Drama Studies , October no. 75 2019; (p. 353-359)

— Review of Cultural Justice & the Right to Thrive Scott Rankin , 2018 single work criticism

'Article 27 of the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights is unequivocal in its claim that culture is central to human dignity and identity. Projects such as Ngapartji Ngapartji, Acoustic Life of Sheds, Project O and Namatjira are 'large-scale, long-term, process-based' partnerships with 'high-needs communities' (25) that intend to go beyond nationally circumscribed ideas about capital 'C' Culture to engage with communities whose stories have been systematically silenced, sidelined, buried or dismissed. Since Big hART's beginning as an arts-based project in Burnie, a community deeply affected by the closure of a paper mill in north-west Tasmania, Big hART has partnered with over fifty communities across Australia and toured its works in theatre, music and film, internationally. Testimony providing evidence of the personal, social and language-recovery outcomes of Big hART's work is affecting, making the impact of Rankin's call for cultural justice speak all the more persuasively as it relates to practice on multiple platforms to multiple audiences. Equally important to the communication of these impacts in this essay is the description of Big hART's five foundational principles or 'domains of change' (15): with individuals and communities (who are supported for at least 150 weeks), with the nation, with art and content, and with knowledge and learning.' (Publication abstract)

Last amended 7 Jan 2020 16:37:46
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