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y separately published work icon In Whom We Trust single work   novel   historical fiction  
Issue Details: First known date: 2019... 2019 In Whom We Trust
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Although set a hundred years ago, John Clanchy's new novel powerfully captures the devastating and persistent reality of a fundamental flaw in the role of our major institutions. Central to In Whom We Trust is James Pearse, an essentially good but circumstantially weak man, who is forced to examine his role at the St Barnabas Home for Children, an orphanage that has betrayed the individuals entrusted to its care. He must face the devastating wider consequences of a life of moral equivocation.' (Publication summary)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Braidwood, Braidwood area, Canberra region (NSW), Southeastern NSW, New South Wales,: Finlay Lloyd , 2019 .
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      Extent: 244p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 26 September 2019
      ISBN: 9780994516558

Works about this Work

'Tropes of Terror' Susan Lever , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , January / February no. 418 2020; (p. 42)

— Review of In Whom We Trust John Clanchy , 2019 single work novel

'The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse has revealed systemic mistreatment of vulnerable children over decades. Though these crimes have not been the exclusive province of the Catholic Church, its education system has brought more children into intimate care by religious orders, and even those never abused have observed the tics of brutality in some of their teachers and mentors. In a note at the end of his new novel, In Whom We Trust, John Clanchy mentions James Joyce’s hell-fire sermon in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916) and the recurrence of these ‘tropes of terror’ in the rhetoric he heard as a Catholic schoolboy in 1960s Melbourne. The system has long-standing practices of psychological control.' (Introduction)

Battlefield of Ghastly Truths Carmel Bird , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 7 December 2019; (p. 23)

— Review of In Whom We Trust John Clanchy , 2019 single work novel

'This tragic story begins in a Catholic presbytery in rural ­Victoria. Father Pearse is reading news of the battlefields of World War I: “The reports discharged their usual cargo of misery.” And so the mood is set for the narrative to breathe with the deepest, darkest, most agonising melancholy. While two of the young characters will be killed at the front, and the priest will be left with the torment of his own moral failure, the church itself will be exposed as a single-minded glaring powerhouse of corruption, a “massive theological boulder” blocking the path of truth.' (Introduction)

Battlefield of Ghastly Truths Carmel Bird , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 7 December 2019; (p. 23)

— Review of In Whom We Trust John Clanchy , 2019 single work novel

'This tragic story begins in a Catholic presbytery in rural ­Victoria. Father Pearse is reading news of the battlefields of World War I: “The reports discharged their usual cargo of misery.” And so the mood is set for the narrative to breathe with the deepest, darkest, most agonising melancholy. While two of the young characters will be killed at the front, and the priest will be left with the torment of his own moral failure, the church itself will be exposed as a single-minded glaring powerhouse of corruption, a “massive theological boulder” blocking the path of truth.' (Introduction)

'Tropes of Terror' Susan Lever , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , January / February no. 418 2020; (p. 42)

— Review of In Whom We Trust John Clanchy , 2019 single work novel

'The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse has revealed systemic mistreatment of vulnerable children over decades. Though these crimes have not been the exclusive province of the Catholic Church, its education system has brought more children into intimate care by religious orders, and even those never abused have observed the tics of brutality in some of their teachers and mentors. In a note at the end of his new novel, In Whom We Trust, John Clanchy mentions James Joyce’s hell-fire sermon in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916) and the recurrence of these ‘tropes of terror’ in the rhetoric he heard as a Catholic schoolboy in 1960s Melbourne. The system has long-standing practices of psychological control.' (Introduction)

Last amended 22 Jan 2020 08:59:33
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