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y separately published work icon Meanjin periodical issue  
Issue Details: First known date: 2019... vol. 78 no. 4 Summer 2019 of Meanjin est. 1940 Meanjin
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'In the December issue of Meanjin Paul Daley takes a long look at the complex legacy of James Cook. In a timely essay ahead of the Cook sestercentennial in 2020, Daley digs deep into the many and conflicting strands of this Australian colonial foundation story. Was Cook a blameless master navigator? Or should he be connected intimately to the dispossession of First Nations peoples that followed his voyage of 1770?' (Introduction)

Notes

  • Contents indexed selectively.

Contents

* Contents derived from the 2019 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Dormitioni"A mirror that refuses to light. Paired", John Hawke , single work poetry (p. 5)
The Study Of Form, The Naming Of Things, Alex Gerrans , single work essay

'The instructions on the seed packets are clear. Damage the seed with sandpaper, cover with boiling water for a day, plant singly and cover with wood ash. It’s a simulation of a fire. The seed is a couple of millimetres long, dark, with the beginning of a root dry at its side, as long as the seed itself. I imagine its unfolding: the pale root extends, the cotyledons open. Compare these to basil or lettuce seeds, tiny specks that must be sown shallow into moist earth and covered in about a millimetre of dirt.' (Introduction)

(p. 9-11)
Joan Sutherland, Margaret Barbalet , single work prose (p. 11-12)
One Fine Day, Dani Netherclift , single work prose (p. 12-15)
Trauma Testaments and Creative Vertigo, Amal Awad , single work column (p. 16-18)
The Forgettory, Tracy Crisp , extract drama

'A few weeks after my mother’s death, I left Australia again and returned to my life in New Zealand. My mother had died unexpectedly in an accident, so we were all struggling to make sense of things, but it is true what they say. It is a terrible thing for a parent to outlive a child.' (Introduction)

(p. 18-21)
Autumn Beginsi"As if the moon were my creature", Diane Fahey , single work poetry (p. 22)
Australia in Three (Crime) Books, Lucy Sussex , single work review
— Review of Force and Fraud : A Tale of the Bush Arthur (Mrs.) Davitt , 1865 single work novel ; Beat Not the Bones Charlotte Jay , 1952 single work novel ; The Broken Shore Peter Temple , 2005 single work novel ;

'If Australia can be represented in three books, there can be little better a genre than crime fiction. European Australia originated as a penal colony, and crime and its representation have been an obsession ever since. It began with convict ballads, then true crime in newspapers, to the gradually developing form of the crime novel over the nineteenth century. Australia was a significant generic innovator here, with Fergus Hume’s 1886 The Mystery of a Hansom Cab being the first crime international blockbuster. Crime-writing in Australia has form, content, swaggering style—and some of the results are outstanding literature by any criteria.' (Introduction)

(p. 23-25)
The Leavingi"On his right that building and solid sea wall", Brian Purcell , single work poetry (p. 41)
Kattadiya, Mesh Tennakoon , single work (p. 44-48)
Cesár Vallejoi"For many years I offered it", Geoff Page , single work poetry (p. 49)
Otway Taenarum, Gregory Day , single work autobiography

'1988. It is five years after the Ash Wednesday bushfires, which devastated many parts of Victoria, including the coastline of the Eastern Otways. It is also Australia’s Bicentennial year. A man in his early twenties sits on the step of a small fibro bungalow in the Aireys Inlet riverflat, in the thick shade of two towering old macrocarpa pines. Catching the light at his feet is a loamy brocade of russet pine needles, stretching across the yard to the sunroom of his house, one of the few buildings in the town to survive the fires.'(Introduction) 

(p. 50-61)
On Cook, Paul Daley , single work biography

'Kurnell is a no-fuss, unpretentious place given that it’s supposed to be the cradle of the nation. Stretching along a promontory that looks like a witch’s finger pointing west from the southern shore of Botany Bay, opposite Sydney Airport, Kurnell is a hotchpotch sprawl of fibro modesty and glass-and-steel ambition, where trailered speedboats rest on the verges and Aussie flags snap on front-yard poles. Nestled in Kamay Botany Bay National Park, Kurnell overlooks a mass of water lacking the frenetic beauty of luminous sails and green and gold ferries, and of some of the international signature structures of modernity, that characterise that other vast nearby inlet that the colonists instead chose as the harbour for their penal settlement.' (Introduction)

(p. 62-78) Section: Meanjin Papers
Hard Wateri"The word", Jaya Savige , single work poetry (p. 79-81)
How We Keep Our Pens Mighty, Bri Lee , single work essay

'I travel around this beautiful country speaking about issues of law and sexual violence, and I cannot do so without acknowledging that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women are three times as likely as non-Indigenous women to have experienced violence; that despite Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders over the age of 18 making up around 2 per cent of our population, they represent 28 per cent of total prisoner population; that we are seeing absolutely no improvements in the rates of Aboriginal deaths in custody and that half of those deaths are of prisoners not even found guilty.'(Introduction)

(p. 92-99)
Life on the Edge, Sinead Roarty , single work prose

'When I was nineteen, my partner, who had the name of an archangel and wore silver polish on his nails, left our inner-city loft early one morning to visit his family in Leichhardt. That night, shortly after midnight, I woke to loud knocking. I thought he had lost his keys. I opened the door to see two police officers, who took their caps off in unison—such an old-fashioned gesture, I would later think—and I immediately knew. They said my archangel had jumped in front of a train.' (Introduction)

(p. 100-106)
#Computationi"O generation of the absolutely online", Carl Walsh , single work poetry (p. 105)
Lovei"Ken loves Barbie and Barbie loves a barbecue", Anthony Lawrence , single work poetry (p. 107)
The Caretaker’s Daughter’s Dog, Carmel Bird , single work short story (p. 108-110)
We Come From The Sea, Maja Amanita , single work autobiography (p. 122-128)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Last amended 19 May 2020 09:35:54
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