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y separately published work icon Black Saturday : Not the End of the Story selected work   biography   prose  
Issue Details: First known date: 2018... 2018 Black Saturday : Not the End of the Story
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The Victorian bushfires of February 2009 captured the attention of all Australians and made headlines around the world. One hundred and seventy-three people lost their lives, the greatest number from any bushfire event in this nation's history.

'In the wake of this tragedy much media and public commentary emphasised recovery, resilience, community, self-sufficiency and renewed determination. Peg Fraser, working as a Museum Victoria curator with survivors in the small settlement of Strathewen, listened to these stories but also to other, more challenging narratives.

'The memories and thoughts that Fraser heard, and gives voice to in this book, complicate much of what we thought we knew about the experience of catastrophic natural events. Although all members of the same community, Strathewen's survivors lived through Black Saturday and its aftermath in ways that were often very different from each other.

'Beginning each chapter with an object from the bushfires - among them a Trewhella jack, a burned mobile phone, a knitted chook and a brick chimney - Fraser explores and reveals how each person's identity, including as a man or a woman with a particular social position in the town, impacted upon experiences and understandings of loss, survival and even the future.'

'This is historical truth of the most vital, affecting and powerful kind.'  (Publication summary)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Clayton, Murrumbeena - Oakleigh - Springvale area, Melbourne South East, Melbourne, Victoria,: Melbourne University Press , 2018 .
      image of person or book cover 580575796231093497.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 256p.
      Note/s:
      • Published: 1st December 2018
      ISBN: 9781925523683

Works about this Work

[Review] Black Saturday: Not the End of the Story Gretel Evans , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Historical Studies , November vol. 50 no. 4 2019; (p. 549-550)

— Review of Black Saturday : Not the End of the Story Peg Fraser , 2018 selected work biography prose

'It is over ten years since the fires on 7 February 2009 burnt throughout Victoria and into the history books. Black Saturday occurred during one of the worst bushfire seasons in Victoria and led to the death of 173 people. Peg Fraser's Black Saturday: Not the End of the Story is an important contribution to the process of remembering and reflecting on the effects and aftermath of the fires.(Introduction)' 

Still Burning Simon Caterson , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 1 February 2019; (p. 16)

— Review of Black Saturday : Not the End of the Story Peg Fraser , 2018 selected work biography prose

'Even if that awful summer day did not become known as Black Saturday, February 7, 2009, could not have been forgotten by anyone who experienced hot northerly winds so fierce it felt as though your eyeballs were being scorched. In inner-suburban Melbourne, where I was that day, the temperature rose above 46C, a record high for the city.'  (Introduction)

Fire Flume Daniel May , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June - July no. 412 2019; (p. 16)

'Stories are at the heart of Peg Fraser’s compassionate and thoughtful book about Strathewen and the 2009 Black Saturday bushfires. The initial impression gained by the subtitle, Not the end of the story, could be one of defiance, a familiar narrative of a community stoically recovering and rebuilding. Yet this book is anything but hackneyed, and the title proves provocative. How could the story of Black Saturday ever end? Is there just one Black Saturday story? Who is making this story, and why? The great American fire historian Stephen J. Pyne has observed that there are three paradigms of academic research on fire – physical, biological, cultural – and that it is the cultural paradigm that is the most neglected. Black Saturday is a ‘story about stories’ and thus represents an important step in the understanding of how Australians live with fire. Fraser challenges the clichés that influence so much public discussion about bushfire tragedies.' (Introduction)

Still Burning Simon Caterson , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 1 February 2019; (p. 16)

— Review of Black Saturday : Not the End of the Story Peg Fraser , 2018 selected work biography prose

'Even if that awful summer day did not become known as Black Saturday, February 7, 2009, could not have been forgotten by anyone who experienced hot northerly winds so fierce it felt as though your eyeballs were being scorched. In inner-suburban Melbourne, where I was that day, the temperature rose above 46C, a record high for the city.'  (Introduction)

[Review] Black Saturday: Not the End of the Story Gretel Evans , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Historical Studies , November vol. 50 no. 4 2019; (p. 549-550)

— Review of Black Saturday : Not the End of the Story Peg Fraser , 2018 selected work biography prose

'It is over ten years since the fires on 7 February 2009 burnt throughout Victoria and into the history books. Black Saturday occurred during one of the worst bushfire seasons in Victoria and led to the death of 173 people. Peg Fraser's Black Saturday: Not the End of the Story is an important contribution to the process of remembering and reflecting on the effects and aftermath of the fires.(Introduction)' 

Fire Flume Daniel May , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June - July no. 412 2019; (p. 16)

'Stories are at the heart of Peg Fraser’s compassionate and thoughtful book about Strathewen and the 2009 Black Saturday bushfires. The initial impression gained by the subtitle, Not the end of the story, could be one of defiance, a familiar narrative of a community stoically recovering and rebuilding. Yet this book is anything but hackneyed, and the title proves provocative. How could the story of Black Saturday ever end? Is there just one Black Saturday story? Who is making this story, and why? The great American fire historian Stephen J. Pyne has observed that there are three paradigms of academic research on fire – physical, biological, cultural – and that it is the cultural paradigm that is the most neglected. Black Saturday is a ‘story about stories’ and thus represents an important step in the understanding of how Australians live with fire. Fraser challenges the clichés that influence so much public discussion about bushfire tragedies.' (Introduction)

Last amended 25 Nov 2019 16:14:20
Subjects:
  • Strathewen, Hurstbridge - St Andrews area, Melbourne - Northeast, Melbourne, Victoria,
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