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y separately published work icon Don Dunstan single work   biography  
Alternative title: Don Dunstan : The Visionary Politician Who Changed Australia
Issue Details: First known date: 2019... 2019 Don Dunstan
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Bob Hawke once said that Don Dunstan was Australia's most influential Australian politician. This is the first comprehensive biography of Dunstan, the transformative and muchloved former Premier of South Australia from 1967–68 and 1970–79. He was a larger than life character and, unlike most state premiers, had a huge national profile. People still remember Dunstan for his pink shorts and championing of sexual rights, but his impact was much wider than this. Against stiff opposition from Adelaide's conservative establishment, he pioneered legislation of Aboriginal land rights and consumer protection laws, abolished the death penalty, relaxed censorship and drinking laws, and decriminalised homosexuality. He is recognised for his role in reinvigorating the social, artistic and cultural life of South Australia during his nine years in office, remembered as the 'Dunstan Decade'.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Crows Nest, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 2019 .
      image of person or book cover 5196033500965166661.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: xi, 332 p 16 unnumberd pages of platesp.
      Note/s:
      • Published August 2019.
      ISBN: 9781760631819

Works about this Work

The Suave Socialist Still in Spotlight Michael Sexton , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 17 August 2019; (p. 22)

— Review of Don Dunstan Angela Woollacott , 2019 single work biography

'Observers of premiers conferences, as they were then called, in Canberra in the first half of the 1970s often remarked that the outstanding participant among the federal and state politicians attending was South Australian premier Don Dunstan.' (Introduction)

Don, but Not Forgotten Walter Marsh , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Adelaide Review , September no. 475 2019; (p. 8-9)

— Review of Don Dunstan Angela Woollacott , 2019 single work biography
'As the state's great progressive hero of the 20th century, Don Dunstan remains an influential and polarising presence in South Australian politics and culture. Two decades after his death, a new biography offers a comprehensive account of the former Premier's life and legacy.' (Introduction)
Don the Divider : An Elegant Biography of the Maverick Politician Christina Slade , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , October no. 415 2019; (p. 62)

— Review of Don Dunstan Angela Woollacott , 2019 single work biography
'Don Dunstan tended to divide those around him, even his parents. His father, Viv, moved from Adelaide to become a company man in Fiji. Peter Kearsley, a contemporary of Don’s who later became chief justice of Fiji, said Viv was ‘a fair dinkum sort of chap’, ‘the sort who would have been an office bearer in a bowling club’. His mother, according to Kearsley, was ‘genteel … deliberately countering stereotypes of what Australians were like. She would not even let Don play rugger.’ She disapproved of his friendship with neighbouring children – the part-Fijian Bill Sorby and the young K.B. Singh. Dunstan himself traced his awareness of racism to his childhood.' 

(Introduction)

Angela Woollacott : Don Dunstan Linda Jaivin , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 21-27 September 2019;

— Review of Don Dunstan Angela Woollacott , 2019 single work biography

'When I immigrated to Australia in 1986, this country was notably forward-looking compared with the United States and Britain, where Reagan’s and Thatcher’s neoliberal policies were busily dismantling civil society and social welfare. Here was universal healthcare, free tertiary education and a decent safety net for society’s most vulnerable. I found palpable excitement about Australian film, popular music and literature. With Uluru recently returned to its traditional owners, it seemed that Indigenous land rights and the redress of historical wrongs were only a matter of time.'(Introduction)

Angela Woollacott : Don Dunstan Linda Jaivin , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 21-27 September 2019;

— Review of Don Dunstan Angela Woollacott , 2019 single work biography

'When I immigrated to Australia in 1986, this country was notably forward-looking compared with the United States and Britain, where Reagan’s and Thatcher’s neoliberal policies were busily dismantling civil society and social welfare. Here was universal healthcare, free tertiary education and a decent safety net for society’s most vulnerable. I found palpable excitement about Australian film, popular music and literature. With Uluru recently returned to its traditional owners, it seemed that Indigenous land rights and the redress of historical wrongs were only a matter of time.'(Introduction)

Don the Divider : An Elegant Biography of the Maverick Politician Christina Slade , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , October no. 415 2019; (p. 62)

— Review of Don Dunstan Angela Woollacott , 2019 single work biography
'Don Dunstan tended to divide those around him, even his parents. His father, Viv, moved from Adelaide to become a company man in Fiji. Peter Kearsley, a contemporary of Don’s who later became chief justice of Fiji, said Viv was ‘a fair dinkum sort of chap’, ‘the sort who would have been an office bearer in a bowling club’. His mother, according to Kearsley, was ‘genteel … deliberately countering stereotypes of what Australians were like. She would not even let Don play rugger.’ She disapproved of his friendship with neighbouring children – the part-Fijian Bill Sorby and the young K.B. Singh. Dunstan himself traced his awareness of racism to his childhood.' 

(Introduction)

Don, but Not Forgotten Walter Marsh , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Adelaide Review , September no. 475 2019; (p. 8-9)

— Review of Don Dunstan Angela Woollacott , 2019 single work biography
'As the state's great progressive hero of the 20th century, Don Dunstan remains an influential and polarising presence in South Australian politics and culture. Two decades after his death, a new biography offers a comprehensive account of the former Premier's life and legacy.' (Introduction)
The Suave Socialist Still in Spotlight Michael Sexton , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 17 August 2019; (p. 22)

— Review of Don Dunstan Angela Woollacott , 2019 single work biography

'Observers of premiers conferences, as they were then called, in Canberra in the first half of the 1970s often remarked that the outstanding participant among the federal and state politicians attending was South Australian premier Don Dunstan.' (Introduction)

Last amended 19 Sep 2019 13:17:54
Subjects:
  • South Australia,
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