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y separately published work icon Hearing Maud : A Journey for a Voice single work   biography   non-fiction  
Issue Details: First known date: 2019... 2019 Hearing Maud : A Journey for a Voice
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Hearing Maud: A Journey for a Voice is a work of creative non-fiction that details the author’s experiences of deafness after losing most of her hearing at age four. It charts how, as she grew up, she was estranged from people and turned to reading and writing for solace, eventually establishing a career as a writer.

'Central to her narrative is the story of Maud Praed, the deaf daughter of 19th century Queensland expatriate novelist Rosa Praed. Although Maud was deaf from infancy, she was educated at a school which taught her to speak rather than sign, a mode difficult for someone with little hearing. The breakup of Maud’s family destabilised her mental health and at age twenty-eight she was admitted to an asylum, where she stayed until she died almost forty years later. It was through uncovering Maud’s story that the author began to understand her own experiences of deafness and how they contributed to her emotional landscape, relationships and career.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Notes

  • Creative non-fiction.

Affiliation Notes

  • Writing Disability in Australia

    Type of disability Deafness.
    Type of character Primary (both autobiographical subject and biographical subject).
    Point of view Mixed.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Nedlands, Inner Perth, Perth, Western Australia,: UWA Publishing , 2019 .
      image of person or book cover 8790424381046118147.jpg
      Cover image courtesy of publisher.
      Extent: 271 p.p.
      Description: illus., ports
      Note/s:
      • Published July 2019.

      ISBN: 9781760800383 (pbk)

Other Formats

Works about this Work

Life Writing When the World Is Burning: The Year in Kylie Cardell , 2020 single work criticism
— Appears in: Biography , vol. 43 no. 1 2020; (p. 1-8)
'It is no surprise that in Australia this year a great deal of life writing has continued to emerge in conjunction with pressing social and political issues. The ongoing national crises of refugee and asylum seeker policy, gendered abuse, and racial discrimination continue to surface in both political and literary arenas, while unprecedented bushfires have decimated the country, bringing climate change back onto the public agenda with new fury. The right of individuals to live with dignity, in safety, and free from fear—and the ongoing challenges to these rights suffered in public and domestic domains—is a connecting thread across the year’s life writing and a theme the genre is uniquely equipped to amplify.' (Introduction)
Jessica White, Hearing Maud Kerrie Davies , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 79 no. 1 2019; (p. 210-213)

— Review of Hearing Maud : A Journey for a Voice Jessica White , 2019 single work biography non-fiction
'Despairing about the proliferation of memoirs, New York Times re viewer Neil Genzlinger once pleaded for a “moment of silence please, for the lost art of shutting up.” Perhaps Genzlinger would be more open to the “hybrid memoir” that leans more overtly into the idea of memoir as a reflection of the self in the crossroads of place, culture and time; less about “me” and more about “us.”' (Introduction)
Pharmakon Rachel Robertson , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 414 2019; (p. 54)

— Review of Hearing Maud : A Journey for a Voice Jessica White , 2019 single work biography non-fiction

'Hearing Maud begins and ends with the notion that the narrator’s life has been defined by a pharmakon, an ancient Greek term denoting something that is both poison and cure. This subtle and more complex version of the ‘gift or loss’ dilemma common in disability memoirs avoids oppositional thinking and embraces instead paradox and nuance. This is typical of Jessica White’s remarkable work of creative non-fiction, which is a sophisticated hybrid of memoir, biography, and critical disability studies.'  (Introduction)

What Should Politicians Be Reading at Parliamentary Book Club? Our Experts Make Their Picks Jane Howard , 2019 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 21 August 2019;
Jessica White : Hearing Maud Louise Swinn , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 3-9 August 2019;

'We live in an age where memoirs arrive thick and fast, and a book deal comes easiest to those in the public eye. When there’s little money in skewering yourself for general consumption unless fame has first taken its toll, it’s unlikely a memoirist ever gets back as much as they give. Towards the end of Jessica White’s Hearing Maud – in which the author bares a great deal of herself – White explains she wants readers to understand how difficult it is being deaf, still, and how hard people with disability must work.' (Introduction)

Pharmakon Rachel Robertson , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 414 2019; (p. 54)

— Review of Hearing Maud : A Journey for a Voice Jessica White , 2019 single work biography non-fiction

'Hearing Maud begins and ends with the notion that the narrator’s life has been defined by a pharmakon, an ancient Greek term denoting something that is both poison and cure. This subtle and more complex version of the ‘gift or loss’ dilemma common in disability memoirs avoids oppositional thinking and embraces instead paradox and nuance. This is typical of Jessica White’s remarkable work of creative non-fiction, which is a sophisticated hybrid of memoir, biography, and critical disability studies.'  (Introduction)

Jessica White, Hearing Maud Kerrie Davies , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 79 no. 1 2019; (p. 210-213)

— Review of Hearing Maud : A Journey for a Voice Jessica White , 2019 single work biography non-fiction
'Despairing about the proliferation of memoirs, New York Times re viewer Neil Genzlinger once pleaded for a “moment of silence please, for the lost art of shutting up.” Perhaps Genzlinger would be more open to the “hybrid memoir” that leans more overtly into the idea of memoir as a reflection of the self in the crossroads of place, culture and time; less about “me” and more about “us.”' (Introduction)
Jessica White : Hearing Maud Louise Swinn , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 3-9 August 2019;

'We live in an age where memoirs arrive thick and fast, and a book deal comes easiest to those in the public eye. When there’s little money in skewering yourself for general consumption unless fame has first taken its toll, it’s unlikely a memoirist ever gets back as much as they give. Towards the end of Jessica White’s Hearing Maud – in which the author bares a great deal of herself – White explains she wants readers to understand how difficult it is being deaf, still, and how hard people with disability must work.' (Introduction)

What Should Politicians Be Reading at Parliamentary Book Club? Our Experts Make Their Picks Jane Howard , 2019 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 21 August 2019;
Life Writing When the World Is Burning: The Year in Kylie Cardell , 2020 single work criticism
— Appears in: Biography , vol. 43 no. 1 2020; (p. 1-8)
'It is no surprise that in Australia this year a great deal of life writing has continued to emerge in conjunction with pressing social and political issues. The ongoing national crises of refugee and asylum seeker policy, gendered abuse, and racial discrimination continue to surface in both political and literary arenas, while unprecedented bushfires have decimated the country, bringing climate change back onto the public agenda with new fury. The right of individuals to live with dignity, in safety, and free from fear—and the ongoing challenges to these rights suffered in public and domestic domains—is a connecting thread across the year’s life writing and a theme the genre is uniquely equipped to amplify.' (Introduction)
Hearing Maud Jessica White , 2015 single work prose
— Appears in: Meanjin Online 2015;
Last amended 16 Nov 2020 09:48:01
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