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y separately published work icon The Pillars single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 2019... 2019 The Pillars
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Don't worry about the housing bubble, she would say. Don't worry about the fact that you will never be able to afford a home. Worry about the day after. That's when they will all come, with their black shirts and bayonets, and then you will see the drowned bodies and slit necks. And I would stand there and say, But Mum, I'm ten years old.

'Working as a writer hasn't granted Panos the financial success he once imagined, but lobbying against a mosque being built across the road from his home (and the occasional meth-fuelled orgy) helps to pass the time. He's also found himself a gig ghostwriting for a wealthy property developer. The pay cheque alone is enough for him to turn a blind eye to some dodgy dealings - at least for the time being.

'In a world full of flashy consumerism and aspiration, can Panos really escape his lot in life? And does he really want to?'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Hachette Australia , 2019 .
      image of person or book cover 2192051001635325432.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 272p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 23 July 2019.

      ISBN: 9780733640186, 9780733640193

Other Formats

  • Dyslexic edition.

Works about this Work

Good Migrant/Bad Migrant Cher Tan , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , September 2020;

— Review of The Pillars Peter Polites , 2019 single work novel

'When Jasbir K. Puar coined the term ‘homonationalism’ in Terrorist Assemblages (2007), she was referring to a liberally-sanctioned queerness that had gained credibility in a post-9/11 world. It was, according to her, a biopolitics that pits a ‘sexual exceptionalism’ of the ‘global gay left’ against ‘perverse, improperly hetero- and homo- Muslim sexualities’. Within homonationalism, there lay the ‘convivial relations’ between queerness and neoliberal tendencies – such as privatisation, militarism, surveillance, deportation and empire – that lean on a nationalistic ‘imagined community’ while hawking an illusory feeling of freedom. Not dissimilar to carceral feminism, homonationalism espouses a quasi-progressive rhetoric that justifies racist, xenophobic and aporophobic positions.' (Introduction)

Jean-Francois Vernay Reviews The Pillars by Peter Polites Jean-François Vernay , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Mascara Literary Review , August no. 25 2020;

— Review of The Pillars Peter Polites , 2019 single work novel

'In her essay on suburbia, Helen Garner discusses the politics of location in Australia and how real estate, or an acute political sense of place, seems to situate people on the social scale. Back in the 1990s, Helen Garner lived in Sydney’s poshest eastern suburbs (Elizabeth Bay and Bellevue Hill), from which Western Sydney seems to be unaccessible, somewhat too remote to explore, and possibly an eyesore which is best left out of sight. As her essay ends on Gerald Murnane’s tribute to these “lower-middle-class suburbs that no one ever goes to or hears about in the news”(1), Murnane’s recitation of the various modest streets in which he lived in his youth surreptitiously morphs into “a splendid and mysterious poem.”(2) What was perhaps to be primarily taken as a solemn moment of sincerity has been sublimated through Garner’s writing skills. These fine creative skills are largely shared by Peter Polites. Barring the lyrical gloss and sentimentality.' (Introduction) 

Peter Polites : Mortgage, Success, Houses, Investment. These Aren't Greek Values Con Stamocostas , 2019 single work
— Appears in: Neos Kosmos , October 2019;

'In creating Panos, the main protagonist for his latest novel The Pillars, author Peter Polites took inspiration from notorious gay right-wing troll Milo Yiannopoulos.' (Introduction)

Vignettes Nail New Narcissists Jack Cameron Stanton , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 17 August 2019; (p. 24)

— Review of The Pillars Peter Polites , 2019 single work novel

'A literary gang is forming. It is made up of writers outside of mainstream White Australia recording their experience of living under its dominion. This new wave is characterised by political urgency and has bloomed alongside, or from within, the identity politics movement.' (Introduction)

Pano Crusader Hillis , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 414 2019; (p. 46)

— Review of The Pillars Peter Polites , 2019 single work novel

'The 2019 federal election result confirmed that housing prices, upward mobility, tax cuts, and limited immigration are powerful motivators for Australian voters. Peter Polites’s second novel, The Pillars, with its themes of social and material advancement in Sydney’s western suburbs, captures this spirit of the time perfectly. Pano, the main character, studies people – those better off, more favoured, those who thrive and make it look easy – and wants a better life for himself. Tertiary educated and an avid observer, Pano has studied the habits, codes, dress, and attitudes that will disguise his second-generation Greek migrant status. He knows how to read a room and knows the room is always reading him, right down to his choice of labels, how he grooms himself and his vocabulary.'  (Introduction)

Pano Crusader Hillis , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 414 2019; (p. 46)

— Review of The Pillars Peter Polites , 2019 single work novel

'The 2019 federal election result confirmed that housing prices, upward mobility, tax cuts, and limited immigration are powerful motivators for Australian voters. Peter Polites’s second novel, The Pillars, with its themes of social and material advancement in Sydney’s western suburbs, captures this spirit of the time perfectly. Pano, the main character, studies people – those better off, more favoured, those who thrive and make it look easy – and wants a better life for himself. Tertiary educated and an avid observer, Pano has studied the habits, codes, dress, and attitudes that will disguise his second-generation Greek migrant status. He knows how to read a room and knows the room is always reading him, right down to his choice of labels, how he grooms himself and his vocabulary.'  (Introduction)

Vignettes Nail New Narcissists Jack Cameron Stanton , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 17 August 2019; (p. 24)

— Review of The Pillars Peter Polites , 2019 single work novel

'A literary gang is forming. It is made up of writers outside of mainstream White Australia recording their experience of living under its dominion. This new wave is characterised by political urgency and has bloomed alongside, or from within, the identity politics movement.' (Introduction)

Jean-Francois Vernay Reviews The Pillars by Peter Polites Jean-François Vernay , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Mascara Literary Review , August no. 25 2020;

— Review of The Pillars Peter Polites , 2019 single work novel

'In her essay on suburbia, Helen Garner discusses the politics of location in Australia and how real estate, or an acute political sense of place, seems to situate people on the social scale. Back in the 1990s, Helen Garner lived in Sydney’s poshest eastern suburbs (Elizabeth Bay and Bellevue Hill), from which Western Sydney seems to be unaccessible, somewhat too remote to explore, and possibly an eyesore which is best left out of sight. As her essay ends on Gerald Murnane’s tribute to these “lower-middle-class suburbs that no one ever goes to or hears about in the news”(1), Murnane’s recitation of the various modest streets in which he lived in his youth surreptitiously morphs into “a splendid and mysterious poem.”(2) What was perhaps to be primarily taken as a solemn moment of sincerity has been sublimated through Garner’s writing skills. These fine creative skills are largely shared by Peter Polites. Barring the lyrical gloss and sentimentality.' (Introduction) 

Good Migrant/Bad Migrant Cher Tan , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , September 2020;

— Review of The Pillars Peter Polites , 2019 single work novel

'When Jasbir K. Puar coined the term ‘homonationalism’ in Terrorist Assemblages (2007), she was referring to a liberally-sanctioned queerness that had gained credibility in a post-9/11 world. It was, according to her, a biopolitics that pits a ‘sexual exceptionalism’ of the ‘global gay left’ against ‘perverse, improperly hetero- and homo- Muslim sexualities’. Within homonationalism, there lay the ‘convivial relations’ between queerness and neoliberal tendencies – such as privatisation, militarism, surveillance, deportation and empire – that lean on a nationalistic ‘imagined community’ while hawking an illusory feeling of freedom. Not dissimilar to carceral feminism, homonationalism espouses a quasi-progressive rhetoric that justifies racist, xenophobic and aporophobic positions.' (Introduction)

Novelist and Playwright Peter Polites Ronnie Scott , 2019 single work column
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 20-26 July 2019;

'In his second novel, The Pillars, Peter Polites uses Australia’s fixation on home ownership to explore the intersection of race, class and sexuality – as well as a growing conservatism within the queer community. “If you look at the generic images coming out of the queer community, there is a very specific aesthetic going on that’s obviously tied to race and class … You can be a total slut monster but still operate within a hegemonic discursive framework. There’s nothing radical about reinforcing dominant discourse. To me, that’s the opposite of sexual liberation.” By Ronnie Scott.' 

Peter Polites : Mortgage, Success, Houses, Investment. These Aren't Greek Values Con Stamocostas , 2019 single work
— Appears in: Neos Kosmos , October 2019;

'In creating Panos, the main protagonist for his latest novel The Pillars, author Peter Polites took inspiration from notorious gay right-wing troll Milo Yiannopoulos.' (Introduction)

Last amended 27 Apr 2020 08:50:01
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