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y separately published work icon The Old Lie single work   novel   science fiction  
Issue Details: First known date: 2019... 2019 The Old Lie
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Shane Daniels and Romany Zetz have been drawn into a war that is not their own. Lives will be destroyed, families will be torn apart. Trust will be broken.

'When the war is over, some will return to a changed world. Will they discover that glory is a lie?

'Claire G. Coleman's new novel takes us to a familiar world to again ask us what we have learned from the past. The Old Lie might not be quite what you expect.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Notes

  • Dedication: For my grandfather and the other Black Diggers, who went to war for a country that did not see them as people.

    For Kate, you deserved better.

    For Lily, Always.

  • Epigraph:

    The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est

    Pro patria mori

    - Wilfred Owen, Dulce et Decorum est

    My subject is war, and the pity of war. 

    The poetry is in the pity.

    - Wilfred Owen

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Hachette Australia , 2019 .
      image of person or book cover 4210667207390311722.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 320p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 27 August 2019.

      ISBN: 9780733640841, 0733640842

Other Formats

  • Sound recording.
  • Large print.

Works about this Work

Native Apocalypse in Claire G. Coleman’s The Old Lie Iva Polak , 2020 single work essay
— Appears in: Humanities , 1 July vol. 9 no. 69 2020; (p. 69)

'Claire G. Coleman’s science fiction novel The Old Lie (2019) evokes the blemished chapters of Australia’s history as the basis of a dystopian futuristic Earth. By using the metaphor of a secular apocalypse (Weaver) wrapped in the form of a space opera, she interrogates historical colonialism on a much larger scale to bring to the fore the distinctive Indigenous experience of Australia’s terra nullius and its horrific offshoots: the Stolen Generations, nuclear tests on Aboriginal land and the treatment of Indigenous war veteran, but this time experienced by the people of the futuristic Earth. Following a brief introduction of the concept of the “Native Apocalypse” (Dillon) in the framework of Indigenous futurism, the paper discusses Coleman’s innovative use of space opera embedded in Wilfred Owen’s famous WWI poem “Dulce et Decorum Est”. The analysis focuses on four allegedly separate stories in the novel which eventually interweave into a single narrative about “the old lie”. In keeping with the twenty-first-century Indigenous futurism, Coleman’s novel does not provide easy answers. Instead, the end brings the reader to the beginning of the novel in the same state of disillusionment as Owen’s lyrical subject.

' (Publication abstract)

[Review] The Old Lie Maddison Stoff , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Aurealis , no. 130 2020;

— Review of The Old Lie Claire G. Coleman , 2019 single work novel
Claire G Coleman's Futurist Novel Is about the Past Sarah L'Estrange (interviewer), 2019 single work podcast interview
— Appears in: The Book Show : 2019 2019;

'In Claire G Coleman's second novel The Old Lie, the earth is under attack by the invading forces of the Conglomeration.

'Humans fight back and join the intergalactic Federation to defend their homeland.

'But it turns out humans aren't full citizens of the Federation and can't easily return.

'The Old Lie is a follow up to Claire's Stella prize shortlisted novel Terra Nullius.

'Through a creative use of historical and science fiction, Terra Nullius explored the dispossession of Indigenous people.

'The Old Lie also uses speculative fiction to confront the legacy of the Stolen Generations. It's set in the future but it's about the past.' (Production summary)

‘Our Legacy Is Truth’: An Interview Elfie Shiosaki (interviewer), 2019 single work interview
— Appears in: Westerly , vol. 64 no. 2 2019; (p. 73-80)
'Claire G. Coleman yarned up her new novel The Old Lie with Westerly’s Editor for Indigenous Writing, Elfie Shiosaki.'
Paradoxes of Colonialism Ed Wright , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 12 October 2019; (p. 25)

— Review of The Old Lie Claire G. Coleman , 2019 single work novel ; Little Stones Elizabeth Kuiper , 2019 single work novel
Frontiers Alison Whittaker , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 414 2019; (p. 30)

— Review of The Old Lie Claire G. Coleman , 2019 single work novel
'In The Old Lie, Claire G. Coleman has given herself a right of reply to her award-winning début novel, Terra Nullius (2017). Here, she strips away some of the racial ambiguity of the human–alien invasion allegory of that novel and leaves in its place a meaty analysis of colonisation and imperialism.' 

 (Introduction)

Claire G. Coleman : The Old Lie Maria Takolander , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 14-20 September 2019;

— Review of The Old Lie Claire G. Coleman , 2019 single work novel

'An innovative tradition of First Nations science fiction has emerged around the world in recent decades. While older works in the genre imagined nightmarish scenarios of reverse colonisation featuring invading aliens – think H. G. Wells’ The War of the Worlds – First Nations science fiction has looked to an all-too-real history of invasion to generate its nightmarish scenarios.'  (Introduction)

Paradoxes of Colonialism Ed Wright , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 12 October 2019; (p. 25)

— Review of The Old Lie Claire G. Coleman , 2019 single work novel ; Little Stones Elizabeth Kuiper , 2019 single work novel
[Review] The Old Lie Maddison Stoff , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Aurealis , no. 130 2020;

— Review of The Old Lie Claire G. Coleman , 2019 single work novel
Claire G Coleman : The Old Lie Michael Jongen , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Newtown Review of Books , October 2019;

'The award-winning author of Terra Nullius returns with an ambitious new novel melding speculative fiction, war and history.'

‘Our Legacy Is Truth’: An Interview Elfie Shiosaki (interviewer), 2019 single work interview
— Appears in: Westerly , vol. 64 no. 2 2019; (p. 73-80)
'Claire G. Coleman yarned up her new novel The Old Lie with Westerly’s Editor for Indigenous Writing, Elfie Shiosaki.'
Native Apocalypse in Claire G. Coleman’s The Old Lie Iva Polak , 2020 single work essay
— Appears in: Humanities , 1 July vol. 9 no. 69 2020; (p. 69)

'Claire G. Coleman’s science fiction novel The Old Lie (2019) evokes the blemished chapters of Australia’s history as the basis of a dystopian futuristic Earth. By using the metaphor of a secular apocalypse (Weaver) wrapped in the form of a space opera, she interrogates historical colonialism on a much larger scale to bring to the fore the distinctive Indigenous experience of Australia’s terra nullius and its horrific offshoots: the Stolen Generations, nuclear tests on Aboriginal land and the treatment of Indigenous war veteran, but this time experienced by the people of the futuristic Earth. Following a brief introduction of the concept of the “Native Apocalypse” (Dillon) in the framework of Indigenous futurism, the paper discusses Coleman’s innovative use of space opera embedded in Wilfred Owen’s famous WWI poem “Dulce et Decorum Est”. The analysis focuses on four allegedly separate stories in the novel which eventually interweave into a single narrative about “the old lie”. In keeping with the twenty-first-century Indigenous futurism, Coleman’s novel does not provide easy answers. Instead, the end brings the reader to the beginning of the novel in the same state of disillusionment as Owen’s lyrical subject.

' (Publication abstract)

Claire G Coleman's Futurist Novel Is about the Past Sarah L'Estrange (interviewer), 2019 single work podcast interview
— Appears in: The Book Show : 2019 2019;

'In Claire G Coleman's second novel The Old Lie, the earth is under attack by the invading forces of the Conglomeration.

'Humans fight back and join the intergalactic Federation to defend their homeland.

'But it turns out humans aren't full citizens of the Federation and can't easily return.

'The Old Lie is a follow up to Claire's Stella prize shortlisted novel Terra Nullius.

'Through a creative use of historical and science fiction, Terra Nullius explored the dispossession of Indigenous people.

'The Old Lie also uses speculative fiction to confront the legacy of the Stolen Generations. It's set in the future but it's about the past.' (Production summary)

Awards

2020 shortlisted Norma K. Hemming Award Long Form
Last amended 5 Aug 2020 10:34:11
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