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y separately published work icon Suburban Space, the Novel and Australian Modernity multi chapter work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 2018... 2018 Suburban Space, the Novel and Australian Modernity
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'‘Suburban Space, the Novel and Australian Modernity’ investigates the interaction between suburbs and suburbia in a century-long series of Australian novels. It puts the often trenchantly anti-suburban rhetoric of Australian fiction in dialogue with its evocative and imaginative rendering of suburban place and time.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Anthem Press ,
      2018 .
      image of person or book cover 8654104981310901927.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 254p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Published November 2018.

      ISBN: 9781783088140

Works about this Work

Review of Brigid Rooney’s Suburban Space, The Novel and Australian Modernity Suzie Gibson , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , April vol. 35 no. 1 2020;

— Review of Suburban Space, the Novel and Australian Modernity Brigid Rooney , 2018 multi chapter work criticism

'The very word suburban often carries a pejorative meaning that aligns it with an unsightly urban sprawl. In reality, many modern suburban homes and streets are tarnished with a lack of individuality, presenting as part of commodified en masse living conditions where every home looks alike down to the ubiquitous and inhospitable roller door garage frontages. Much has been written about suburban spaces and the need to liberate one’s self from their insularity. A widely known example is Richard Yates’s famed Revolutionary Road (1961), chronicling a couple’s efforts to retrieve their marriage through daring plans to leave their leafy suburban life in Connecticut in order to make a break for Paris – a glittering world city that promises to replace sombre mediocrity with freedom and glamour.' (Publication abstract)

[Review] Like Nothing on This Earth: A Literary History of the Wheatbelt and Suburban Space, the Novel and Australian Modernity Meg Brayshaw , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , November no. 65 2019;

— Review of Like Nothing on This Earth : A Literary History of the Wheatbelt Tony Hughes-d'Aeth , 2017 multi chapter work criticism ; Suburban Space, the Novel and Australian Modernity Brigid Rooney , 2018 multi chapter work criticism
'In his landmark work of spatial history The Road to Botany Bay (1988), Paul Carter delineates the close relationship between Australian space and language. The modern settler nation was inaugurated not only through the invaders’ physical presence but also their assertion of linguistic control through written documentation. Accordingly, space, place and land often frame investigations of settler Australian literature and culture. Despite this, however, the transnational fervour for place-based literary studies and literary geography has not produced an abundance of site-specific critical monographs on place in Australian literature. In this context, Tony Hughes-d’Aeth’s Like Nothing on This Earth: A Literary History of the Wheatbelt (UWAP, 2017) and Brigid Rooney’s Suburban Space, The Novel and Australian Modernity (Anthem, 2018) are significant recent works of Australian scholarship, offering careful and compelling critical investigations of the complex meaning-making relations of space, place and text.' (Introduction)
[Review] Suburban Space, the Novel and Australian Modernity Elizabeth McMahon , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , December vol. 78 no. 3 2018; (p. 245-251)

— Review of Suburban Space, the Novel and Australian Modernity Brigid Rooney , 2018 multi chapter work criticism
'It was my very great pleasure to launch Suburban Space, the Novel and Australian Modernity by Brigid Rooney at Sappho Books last December. Brigid is a colleague in Australian literary studies, the current President of the Australian Association for the study of Australian Literature, and current chair of English at University of Sydney. So, quite a full plate. In addition, she has written an outstanding book that opens up the question of suburbia in Australian fiction: the architectures, streets, cultures, their inherent nostalgia and their brutality.' (Introduction)
[Review] Suburban Space, the Novel and Australian Modernity Elizabeth McMahon , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , December vol. 78 no. 3 2018; (p. 245-251)

— Review of Suburban Space, the Novel and Australian Modernity Brigid Rooney , 2018 multi chapter work criticism
'It was my very great pleasure to launch Suburban Space, the Novel and Australian Modernity by Brigid Rooney at Sappho Books last December. Brigid is a colleague in Australian literary studies, the current President of the Australian Association for the study of Australian Literature, and current chair of English at University of Sydney. So, quite a full plate. In addition, she has written an outstanding book that opens up the question of suburbia in Australian fiction: the architectures, streets, cultures, their inherent nostalgia and their brutality.' (Introduction)
[Review] Like Nothing on This Earth: A Literary History of the Wheatbelt and Suburban Space, the Novel and Australian Modernity Meg Brayshaw , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , November no. 65 2019;

— Review of Like Nothing on This Earth : A Literary History of the Wheatbelt Tony Hughes-d'Aeth , 2017 multi chapter work criticism ; Suburban Space, the Novel and Australian Modernity Brigid Rooney , 2018 multi chapter work criticism
'In his landmark work of spatial history The Road to Botany Bay (1988), Paul Carter delineates the close relationship between Australian space and language. The modern settler nation was inaugurated not only through the invaders’ physical presence but also their assertion of linguistic control through written documentation. Accordingly, space, place and land often frame investigations of settler Australian literature and culture. Despite this, however, the transnational fervour for place-based literary studies and literary geography has not produced an abundance of site-specific critical monographs on place in Australian literature. In this context, Tony Hughes-d’Aeth’s Like Nothing on This Earth: A Literary History of the Wheatbelt (UWAP, 2017) and Brigid Rooney’s Suburban Space, The Novel and Australian Modernity (Anthem, 2018) are significant recent works of Australian scholarship, offering careful and compelling critical investigations of the complex meaning-making relations of space, place and text.' (Introduction)
Review of Brigid Rooney’s Suburban Space, The Novel and Australian Modernity Suzie Gibson , 2020 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , April vol. 35 no. 1 2020;

— Review of Suburban Space, the Novel and Australian Modernity Brigid Rooney , 2018 multi chapter work criticism

'The very word suburban often carries a pejorative meaning that aligns it with an unsightly urban sprawl. In reality, many modern suburban homes and streets are tarnished with a lack of individuality, presenting as part of commodified en masse living conditions where every home looks alike down to the ubiquitous and inhospitable roller door garage frontages. Much has been written about suburban spaces and the need to liberate one’s self from their insularity. A widely known example is Richard Yates’s famed Revolutionary Road (1961), chronicling a couple’s efforts to retrieve their marriage through daring plans to leave their leafy suburban life in Connecticut in order to make a break for Paris – a glittering world city that promises to replace sombre mediocrity with freedom and glamour.' (Publication abstract)

Last amended 23 Jul 2019 08:28:22
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