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y separately published work icon Green Shadows and Other Poems selected work   poetry  
Issue Details: First known date: 2019... 2019 Green Shadows and Other Poems
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Gerald Murnane turns to poetry at the end of his literary career, writing frank, disarming poems that traverse the rich span of his life.  

'I esteem / above all poems or passages of prose / those that put a lump in my throat. — Gerald Murnane, ‘The Darkling Thrush’

'Gerald Murnane, now in his eightieth year, began his writing career as a poet. After many years as a writer of fiction, he only returned to poetry a few years ago when he moved to Goroke, in the Western Districts of Victoria, after the death of his wife. The forty-five poems collected here are in a strikingly different mode to his fiction — without framing or digressions, and with very few images, they speak openly to the reader of the author’s memories, beliefs and experiences. They are for this reason an important addition to his internationally recognised body of fiction, most recently Border Districts and Collected Short Fiction, published by Giramondo.

'The poems include tributes to his mother and father and to his family, and to places that have played a formative role in his life, like Gippsland, Bendigo, Warrnambool, the Western Districts, and of course Goroke. Especially moving are his poems dedicated to authors who have influenced him — Lesbia Harford and Thomas Hardy, William Carlos Williams, Henry Handel Richardson, Marcel Proust, and with particular force, the eighteenth-century poet John Clare, who gives the collection its title, revered ‘not only for his writings / but for his losing his reason when / he was forced from the district he had wanted as his for life.’'  (Publication summary)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Artarmon, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Giramondo Publishing , 2019 .
      image of person or book cover 485957939609457377.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 104p.
      Note/s:
      • Published February 2019

      ISBN: 9781925336986
      Series: y separately published work icon Giramondo Poets Giramondo Publishing (publisher), Artarmon : Giramondo Publishing , 2006- Z1440074 2006 series - publisher

Works about this Work

Earl Livings Reviews Green Shadows and Other Poems by Gerald Murnane Earl Livings , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Plumwood Mountain [Online] , December 2019;

— Review of Green Shadows and Other Poems Gerald Murnane , 2019 selected work poetry
Inelegant Dissent and Whispers of Wisdom Peter Craven , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 9 March 2019; (p. 21)

— Review of Green Shadows and Other Poems Gerald Murnane , 2019 selected work poetry

'What an odd thing it is that Gerald Murnane, the great Australian minimalist who modulates the monotonies of his flawless sentences the way Rothko modulates his shades of colour, the 80-year-old Australian writer touted as an outsider (but less so now) for the Nobel Prize in Literature, should produce such a strange yet revealing book of poems.'  (Introduction)

Isolation, Breavement & Love of Landscape: Leonie Bingham Reviews ‘Green Shadows and Other Poems’ by Gerald Murnane Leonie Bingham , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Rochford Street Review , no. 26 2019;

— Review of Green Shadows and Other Poems Gerald Murnane , 2019 selected work poetry

'Gerald Murnane’s latest literary offering, Green Shadows and Other Poems, is the octogenarian’s poignant homage to a life spent in rural Victoria. This forty-five poem collection is deeply personal, and a departure from Murnane’s previous novels, short stories, and 2015 memoir, Something for the Pain. After a lengthy hiatus from poetry, he returned to the form after moving to inland Goroke in 2009 upon the death of his wife. There he took up residence in a shed in his son’s backyard.' (Introduction)

Turf Geoff Page , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , March no. 409 2019; (p. 46)

'There has been a long and often troubled history of poets writing novels and novelists writing poetry. The skills needed are very different and equally hard to learn. Few writers have made equal careers in both. If they do, it’s usually the novels that receive most attention. (Margaret Atwood and Michael Ondaatje spring to mind.) Many major novelists, however, had some poetry among their early work. F. Scott Fitzgerald and William Faulkner started penning Keats imitations. Some novelists, like David Foster, have put out a book of poetry, had it negatively reviewed, and have then returned, with some chagrin, to prose. Similarly, some poets’ novels are dismissed for their ‘poetic prose’. There is a strong tendency among poets and novelists (even among their reviewers) to ‘protect their own turf’, as it were.' (Introduction)

Gerald Murnane : Green Shadows and Other Poems Maria Takolander , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 9-15 February 2019;

'Gerald Murnane’s insular, self-reflexive and obsessive style of essayistic fiction has attracted special praise of late. However, while The New York Times may have described him as “the greatest living English-language writer most people have never heard of”, Murnane’s first poetry collection, Green Shadows and Other Poems, is not exactly a heavyweight affair.' (Introduction)

Isolation, Breavement & Love of Landscape: Leonie Bingham Reviews ‘Green Shadows and Other Poems’ by Gerald Murnane Leonie Bingham , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Rochford Street Review , no. 26 2019;

— Review of Green Shadows and Other Poems Gerald Murnane , 2019 selected work poetry

'Gerald Murnane’s latest literary offering, Green Shadows and Other Poems, is the octogenarian’s poignant homage to a life spent in rural Victoria. This forty-five poem collection is deeply personal, and a departure from Murnane’s previous novels, short stories, and 2015 memoir, Something for the Pain. After a lengthy hiatus from poetry, he returned to the form after moving to inland Goroke in 2009 upon the death of his wife. There he took up residence in a shed in his son’s backyard.' (Introduction)

Inelegant Dissent and Whispers of Wisdom Peter Craven , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 9 March 2019; (p. 21)

— Review of Green Shadows and Other Poems Gerald Murnane , 2019 selected work poetry

'What an odd thing it is that Gerald Murnane, the great Australian minimalist who modulates the monotonies of his flawless sentences the way Rothko modulates his shades of colour, the 80-year-old Australian writer touted as an outsider (but less so now) for the Nobel Prize in Literature, should produce such a strange yet revealing book of poems.'  (Introduction)

Earl Livings Reviews Green Shadows and Other Poems by Gerald Murnane Earl Livings , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Plumwood Mountain [Online] , December 2019;

— Review of Green Shadows and Other Poems Gerald Murnane , 2019 selected work poetry
Gerald Murnane : Green Shadows and Other Poems Maria Takolander , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 9-15 February 2019;

'Gerald Murnane’s insular, self-reflexive and obsessive style of essayistic fiction has attracted special praise of late. However, while The New York Times may have described him as “the greatest living English-language writer most people have never heard of”, Murnane’s first poetry collection, Green Shadows and Other Poems, is not exactly a heavyweight affair.' (Introduction)

Turf Geoff Page , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , March no. 409 2019; (p. 46)

'There has been a long and often troubled history of poets writing novels and novelists writing poetry. The skills needed are very different and equally hard to learn. Few writers have made equal careers in both. If they do, it’s usually the novels that receive most attention. (Margaret Atwood and Michael Ondaatje spring to mind.) Many major novelists, however, had some poetry among their early work. F. Scott Fitzgerald and William Faulkner started penning Keats imitations. Some novelists, like David Foster, have put out a book of poetry, had it negatively reviewed, and have then returned, with some chagrin, to prose. Similarly, some poets’ novels are dismissed for their ‘poetic prose’. There is a strong tendency among poets and novelists (even among their reviewers) to ‘protect their own turf’, as it were.' (Introduction)

Last amended 26 Sep 2019 09:14:52
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