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y separately published work icon Rabbit periodical issue  
Alternative title: Belonging
Issue Details: First known date: 2018... no. 26 2018 of Rabbit est. 2011 Rabbit
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Not knowing how to start this editorial, I lazily google ‘belong’. A grossly simplified e-dictionary pops up to tell me that ‘belong’ comes from Middle English: ‘be-’ + an archaic form of ‘long’. But rather than investigate longen like the diligent researcher I should be, I am temporarily sidetracked; I think intensely about ‘being long’, consider stretching out on the ground, pointing my toes, elongating my spine, straightening my fingers. I think about being the longest me I can be.' (Jessica Wilkinson Editorial introduction)

Notes

  • Only literary material by Australian authors individually indexed. Other material in this issue includes:

    Elegy by Devin Kelly

    The Magician by Alysse Kathleen McCanna

    Might Kindred by Monica Gomery

    Remember When by Adam Berlin

    Cositas by Katie Afshar

    Migration Story by Juliana Chang

    The Houses I Grew Up In by Ashia Ajani

    Poem Where I Contend the Arc of History Bends Toward Itself by Cortney Lamar Charleston

    Phan Quynh Tram Interviews Nha Thuyen

    When is it Enough? and Bao Gio Thoi Roi Rung by Nha Thuyen

Contents

* Contents derived from the 2018 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Poetry Editorial, Eileen Chong , single work essay

'One of my earliest memories in life is set in my kindergarten classroom. I am five years old, and I am trying to make friends with a girl who has her hair tied in two ponytails, one on either side of her head. On some days, she has fluffy red adornments in her hair; her mouth is as small and as stained as a cheery. She already has a special friend. She does not want to be mine. I am trying to talk to her in class, but she raises her hand, and tells the teacher I am bothering her. The teacher puts masking tape over my mouth. I begin to cry, and the alphabet and its accompanying pictures on the chart pinned to the wall begin to blur. I cannot breathe; I am crying so hard,my nose has blocked up. A is for apple, B is for ball. The cat is yellow, the dog is brown. The teacher looks worried, and gestures to me to take the masking tape off. The girl I like puts her had up and tells the teacher. I never speak to her again.' (Introduction)

(p. 6-7)
Velodrome of Springi"Don't forget who got sent to the camps.", Adam Aitken , single work poetry (p. 10-11)
Space Invadersi"In my mother's corner store, where a burst bottle cut", Shane Strange , single work poetry (p. 12-13)
Sepik Warai"The Sepik in languorous flow has shed its crocodiles to the red-earthed banks,", Carl Walsh , single work poetry (p. 16-17)
Lantanai"at the heart of the lantana warren", Chloë Callistemon , single work poetry (p. 18-19)
Becoming Paruwai"I come home to my father", Chris Lynch , single work poetry (p. 20-23)
Returni"Walking in the house that has never", Kate Middleton , single work poetry (p. 24-25)
A Night Like Thisi"Like God, Im over it", Stuart Barnes , single work poetry (p. 26-27)
The Long Stems Leaning Forwardi"So often it is the glimpses that give her joy:", Helen Parsons , single work poetry (p. 28-29)
A Map of Mothersi"I hold my mother in my mouth", Nadia Niaz , single work poetry (p. 30-31)
Impressioni"Each night, when I'm prone, the", Andy Jackson , single work poetry (p. 36-37)
Unfamiliari"begats and", Joanne Burns , single work poetry (p. 42-43)
I Regard Our Wide Skinsi"the surface is the line between", Kiera Lindsey , single work poetry (p. 44-45)
Clayi"i break ground evict lawn dig weeds break grass", Liam Ferney , single work poetry (p. 52-53)
Often I Am Permutated into a Mermaidi"as if it weren't obscene enough already to make up", Toby Fitch , single work poetry (p. 58-60)
Suburban Ghazali"footballs are kicked and slapped, soaring", Prithvi Varatharajan , single work poetry (p. 62-63)
Lullabyi"My nieces, aged four and six, are bundled on mattresses", Maria Takolander , single work poetry (p. 64-66)
Fluid Dynamicsi"a squatting bater bead with yocic", Georgina Woods , single work poetry (p. 68-69)
Tom's Bluesi"Fairy Meadow has everything you need.", Ali Smith , single work poetry (p. 74-75)
The Cholmondeley Ladiesi"Sisters do not sit like this", Isabella Mead , single work poetry (p. 76-77)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Poetry Editorial Eileen Chong , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Rabbit , no. 26 2018; (p. 6-7)

'One of my earliest memories in life is set in my kindergarten classroom. I am five years old, and I am trying to make friends with a girl who has her hair tied in two ponytails, one on either side of her head. On some days, she has fluffy red adornments in her hair; her mouth is as small and as stained as a cheery. She already has a special friend. She does not want to be mine. I am trying to talk to her in class, but she raises her hand, and tells the teacher I am bothering her. The teacher puts masking tape over my mouth. I begin to cry, and the alphabet and its accompanying pictures on the chart pinned to the wall begin to blur. I cannot breathe; I am crying so hard,my nose has blocked up. A is for apple, B is for ball. The cat is yellow, the dog is brown. The teacher looks worried, and gestures to me to take the masking tape off. The girl I like puts her had up and tells the teacher. I never speak to her again.' (Introduction)

Poetry Editorial Eileen Chong , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Rabbit , no. 26 2018; (p. 6-7)

'One of my earliest memories in life is set in my kindergarten classroom. I am five years old, and I am trying to make friends with a girl who has her hair tied in two ponytails, one on either side of her head. On some days, she has fluffy red adornments in her hair; her mouth is as small and as stained as a cheery. She already has a special friend. She does not want to be mine. I am trying to talk to her in class, but she raises her hand, and tells the teacher I am bothering her. The teacher puts masking tape over my mouth. I begin to cry, and the alphabet and its accompanying pictures on the chart pinned to the wall begin to blur. I cannot breathe; I am crying so hard,my nose has blocked up. A is for apple, B is for ball. The cat is yellow, the dog is brown. The teacher looks worried, and gestures to me to take the masking tape off. The girl I like puts her had up and tells the teacher. I never speak to her again.' (Introduction)

Last amended 30 Jan 2020 06:00:09
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