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Issue Details: First known date: 2018... vol. 63 no. 2 November 2018 of Westerly est. 1956 Westerly
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Writing has long been recognised as a way of locating the self. As a concept, this functions in multifaceted ways, from the importance of cultural expression and representation, to philosophical and linguistic conceptualisations of subjectivity in language. Emile Benveniste wrote of the fall into language : 

'it is in and through language that man constitutes himself as a subject, because language alone establishes the concept of 'ego' in reality, it its reality which is that of the being. '

(From the Editors 8)

Notes

  •  Epigraph:

    Story-telling, the pleasure of sitting in close company and listening to a story, allowing oneself to float free in the moment and enter, both in the senses and in imagination, into the story’s events so that the story becomes our own, must be one of the oldest and earliest of our pleasures—a function of that uniquely human faculty in us, the capacity to step beyond the actual into the possible. 

    - ‘A Unique and Necessary Form’ by David Malouf

  • Only literary material within AustLit's scope individually indexed. Other material in this issue includes:

    Wayne Price If You Can't See Me, I Can't See You   

    Carrie Etter The Message

    Vahni Capildeo Divination: Linen and Dolphins

    Mariko Nagai Occupied State

    Jane Monson The Patchwork Boy

    Holly Iglesias Suitable for Framing

Contents

* Contents derived from the 2018 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
A Unique and Necessary Form, David Malouf , single work essay

'Story-telling, the pleasure of sitting in close company and listening to a story, allowing oneself to float free in the moment and enter, both in the senses and in imagination, into the story's events so that the story becomes our own, must be one of the oldest and earliest of our pleasures - a function of that uniquely human faculty in us, the capacity to step beyond the actual into the possible.' (Introduction)

(p. 10-15)
(Without You)i"to hear the chatter by eyes as if through a pane", Anne Elvey , single work poetry (p. 16)
Namatjira's Ghost Gumsi"Arrernte man", Rose Lucas , single work poetry (p. 17)
Sovereignty, Self-Determination and Speaking Our Freedoms : An Interview with Julie Dowling, Elfie Shiosaki (interviewer), single work interview

'Julie Dowling yarned up her exhibition Yagu Gurlbarl (Big Secret) with Westerly's Editor of Indigenous Writing, Elfie Shiosaki. This exhibition is touring with Art on the Move in 2018.' (Introduction)

(p. 26-34)
Fracturesi"I was part of a book, and the sentences that possessed me were eloquent", Paul Hetherington , single work poetry (p. 35)
Rackoffteursi"Whenever I go down on you", Michael Farrell , single work poetry (p. 36-37)
Take Iti"don't trust this poem", Steve Evans , single work poetry (p. 38)
All of the Relatives, Rose van Son , single work short story (p. 39-40)
The Northam Noongar Poetry Project, Jessica Wraight , single work essay

'In 2017, CAN (Community Arts Network) ran its 'Rekindling Stories on Country' program with the Northam Noongar community on Ballardong Country. The participating group chose poetry as a form to share memories, anecdotes an expressions of place, family and local history. Some participants had written poetry in private for many years. Others were keen to try their hand at poetry as a starting point for documenting personal and family stories.' (Introduction)

(p. 41-42)
Bilya Kepi"Nitja ngulla bilya-kep koorliny.", Deborah Moody , single work poetry (p. 43)
A Bush Walki"A small crowd has gathered,", Yvonne Kickett , single work poetry (p. 44-45)
Story of My Lifei"Taken far away as a child, from my dad and mum", Janet Kickett , single work poetry (p. 46)
Humble Mani"A gentle face with a trophy smile.", Cyndy Moody , single work poetry (p. 47)
Rise Up and Be Strongi"Day after day, week after week, month after month", Julie Wynne , single work poetry (p. 48)
The Pool, Troy Dagg , single work short story (p. 49-55)
Writer as Translator : On Translation and Postmodern Appropriation in Nicholas Jose's The Red Thread : A Love Story, Wang Guanglin , single work criticism

'In 'The Death of the Author', Roland Bathes develops a post-structuralist approach to the issues of reading, writing, and the relationship between texts and the signs that comprise them. Barthes begins the paper with an illustration of the novella Sarrasine by Honore de Balzac, in which a castrato is disguised as a woman, and of whom Balzac writes the following sentence :'This was woman herself, with her sudden fears, her irrational whims, her instinctive worries, her impetuous boldness, her fussings, and her delicious sensibility' (Balzac in Barthes 142). (Introduction)

(p. 56-67)
Hotel Del Coronadoi"The past is so easy to photograph.", Ella Jeffery , single work poetry (p. 68)
Robin, Morghyn, Motheri"Morghyn, weave me a nest", Sue Peachey , single work poetry (p. 69)
Removed : An Excerpt from Shared Lives on Nigena Country, Jacinta Solonec , single work biography

'Faces swollen and sticky with tears and dust, they clung to one another.' 

Jimmy Casim was a teenager when he came to Australia in the 1880s. He was a deckhand on an Indian cargo vessel, of which his uncle was the bosun (Fraser: 2003). At that time, ships from the subcontinent delivered teams of Afghan cameleers and their camels to Australian ports for the 'opening up' of the inland. They were heady days when his uncle's ship made several trips a year back and forth from Karachi to Fremantle (State Records Office). Jimmy became ill on one of those voyages so with his uncle's encouragement to seek help he 'jumped ship' only to remain the Western Australia for the rest of his life (Fraser: 2013; Goodall et al. 57). Like others from his part of the world the young seafarer merged into a life of indentured labour, and he merged with Aboriginal peoples. Jimmy Casim was my maternal great-grandfather.'  (Introduction)

(p. 70-83)
The Mañana Approach, Kira McPherson , single work short story (p. 84-89)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Last amended 4 Dec 2018 12:03:55
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