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y separately published work icon Speaking Up single work   autobiography  
Issue Details: First known date: 2018... 2018 Speaking Up
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'As president of the Human Rights Commission, Gillian Triggs advocated for the disempowered, the disenfranchised, the marginalised. She withstood relentless political pressure and media scrutiny as she defended the defenceless for five tumultuous years.
'How did this aspiring ballet dancer, dignified daughter of a tank commander and eminent law academic respond when appreciative passengers on a full airplane departing Canberra greeted her with a round of applause?
'Speaking Up shares with readers the values that have guided Triggs' convictions and the causes she has championed. She dares women to be a little vulgar and men to move beyond their comfort zones to achieve equity for all. And she will not rest until Australia has a Bill of Rights.
'Triggs' passionate memoir is an irresistible call to everyone who yearns for a fairer world. '  (Publication summary)
 

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Carlton, Parkville - Carlton area, Melbourne - North, Melbourne, Victoria,: Melbourne University Press , 2018 .
      image of person or book cover 8307858723743553714.jpg
      This image has been sourced from Booktopia
      Extent: 277p.
      Note/s:
      • Published: 1st October 2018
         

      ISBN: 9780522873511

Works about this Work

Books Roundup : Speaking Up, The Fragments, The Butcherbird Stories Ellen Cregan , Freya Howarth , Justine Hyde , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Kill Your Darlings [Online] , October 2018;

— Review of Speaking Up Gillian Triggs , 2018 single work autobiography ; The Fragments Toni Jordan , 2018 single work novel ; The Butcherbird Stories A. S. Patrić , 2018 selected work short story
Knowing Gillian Triggs : The Memoirs of a Formidable and Polarising Lawyer Jane Cadzow , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , November no. 406 2018; (p. 19-20)

'Gillian Triggs is a pearls-and-perfectly-cut-jacket person these days, so it is thrilling to learn that she was dressed head to toe in motorcycle leathers when she had one of the more instructive experiences of her life. It was 1972, and Triggs, the future president of the Australian Human Rights Commission, was in the United States working as a legal adviser at the Dallas Police Department. She and a colleague took a motorbike trip through rural Wisconsin, twenty-six-year-old Triggs riding pillion as they sped through forests and open countryside. When they pulled into a backblocks petrol station, the attendant took one look at them and refused to fill their tank. ‘I remember vividly the shock of realising that we were not welcome and, worse, we could not refuel,’ Triggs writes in Speaking Up. She adds that her colleague was less surprised. ‘He was a black American.’' (Introduction)

Books Roundup : Speaking Up, The Fragments, The Butcherbird Stories Ellen Cregan , Freya Howarth , Justine Hyde , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Kill Your Darlings [Online] , October 2018;

— Review of Speaking Up Gillian Triggs , 2018 single work autobiography ; The Fragments Toni Jordan , 2018 single work novel ; The Butcherbird Stories A. S. Patrić , 2018 selected work short story
Knowing Gillian Triggs : The Memoirs of a Formidable and Polarising Lawyer Jane Cadzow , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , November no. 406 2018; (p. 19-20)

'Gillian Triggs is a pearls-and-perfectly-cut-jacket person these days, so it is thrilling to learn that she was dressed head to toe in motorcycle leathers when she had one of the more instructive experiences of her life. It was 1972, and Triggs, the future president of the Australian Human Rights Commission, was in the United States working as a legal adviser at the Dallas Police Department. She and a colleague took a motorbike trip through rural Wisconsin, twenty-six-year-old Triggs riding pillion as they sped through forests and open countryside. When they pulled into a backblocks petrol station, the attendant took one look at them and refused to fill their tank. ‘I remember vividly the shock of realising that we were not welcome and, worse, we could not refuel,’ Triggs writes in Speaking Up. She adds that her colleague was less surprised. ‘He was a black American.’' (Introduction)

Last amended 2 Oct 2018 08:50:51
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