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The End of the World As We Know It single work   essay  
Issue Details: First known date: 2018... 2018 The End of the World As We Know It
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'From Armageddon to Ragnarok and the Rapture, humans persist in imagining the end of the world. The religious term is eschatology, and the literary terms are many. Some are jocular (Disaster Porn), or precisely denote a sub-genre (Post-Apocalypse, Solarpunk). Climate change or Anthropocene fiction is the latest variant on the theme, and if we believe our scientists — and woe betide us if we do not — these may be the final words. The end of the world as we know it approacheth, and nobody is feeling fine. Even the denialists feel the heat of the sand around their heads.'  (Introduction)

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Last amended 14 May 2019 15:29:58
https://sydneyreviewofbooks.com/dyschronia-jennifer-mills-how-to-bee/ The End of the World As We Know Itsmall AustLit logo Sydney Review of Books
Subjects:
  • Dyschronia Jennifer Mills , 2018 single work novel
  • How to Bee Bren MacDibble , 2017 single work children's fiction
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