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y separately published work icon Glass Life selected work   poetry  
Issue Details: First known date: 2018... 2018 Glass Life
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Through Jo Langdon's gaze, the ordinary world is transformed into a snow globe of wondrous possibility. The city and its objects move impressionistically, summer bodies dissemble, and daily routines take on an uncanny glow. Domestic realities are glimpsed or suggested, small histories reveal a chiaroscuro of darkness and light.' 

Source: Publisher's blurb

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

William Farnsworth Reviews Glass Life by Jo Langdon William Farnsworth , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Mascara Literary Review , March no. 23 2019;

— Review of Glass Life Jo Langdon , 2018 selected work poetry

'On opening the first pages of Jo Langdon’s second collection, Glass Life, one might, at first, have the sense of reading through a poet’s travelogue. Among the first few poems there are descriptions of the modernist Hauptbahnhof station in Berlin or the glaze ice sculpture of the nativity scene (Eiskrippe) in Graz, Austria. Here, a theme integral to the collection is implied: fragility and strength in balance with each other; a starting point for Langdon’s lyrical journey of introspective musings and wanderlust.' (Introduction)

William Farnsworth Reviews Glass Life by Jo Langdon William Farnsworth , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Mascara Literary Review , March no. 23 2019;

— Review of Glass Life Jo Langdon , 2018 selected work poetry

'On opening the first pages of Jo Langdon’s second collection, Glass Life, one might, at first, have the sense of reading through a poet’s travelogue. Among the first few poems there are descriptions of the modernist Hauptbahnhof station in Berlin or the glaze ice sculpture of the nativity scene (Eiskrippe) in Graz, Austria. Here, a theme integral to the collection is implied: fragility and strength in balance with each other; a starting point for Langdon’s lyrical journey of introspective musings and wanderlust.' (Introduction)

Last amended 28 Aug 2018 10:32:48
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