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y separately published work icon Meanjin periodical issue  
Alternative title: The Turning Point
Issue Details: First known date: 2018... vol. 77 no. 2 Winter 2018 of Meanjin est. 1940 Meanjin
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Clementine Ford wonders whether the #MeToo movement represents a turning point for women, Anna Spargo-Ryan thinks not: 'In the wake of #MeToo, when women said "this time it will be different", it wasn't.' Joumanah El Matrah picks over the idea of religious freedom, Liz Conor recalls the section 18C case against cartoonist Bill Leak, and an earlier race controversy over the work of Eric Jolliffe. Clare Payne argues that women are entering a new age of economic empowerment. Timmah Ball brings an Indigenous perspective to the home ownership debate, Hugh Mackay offers calm reflections on the madness of Year 12, Carmel Bird ponders her many connections to Nobel Prize contender Gerald Murnane, and Harry Saddler listens to the world with the ears of a dog.

'There's new fiction from Randa Abdel-Fattah, Beejay Silcox, Laura Elvery and Vogel Prize winner Emily O'Grady. The edition's poets include: Fiona Wright, John Kinsella, Kevin Brophy, Kate Middleton and Hazel Smith.' (Publication summary)

Notes

  • Only literary material within AustLit's scope individually indexed. Other material in this issue includes:

    A Formal Inequality by Anna Spargo-Ryan

    Surround Sound by Harry Saddler

    UFOs Seen and Unseen by Phillipa Grenda

    Stop Laughing, This is Serious by Ben Pobjie 

    Contracting God by Joumanah El Matrah

    What Do You Do In a National Park? Andrea Baldwin

    On the Madness of Year 12 Hugh Mackay

    Milo YiannopoulosRaging Bullfrogs, Goadboys, Section 18c and Other Masculinist Misadventures Liz Conor

    Imagining the Blockchain Economy Chris Berg, Sinclair Davidson and Jason Potts

    A Sunbeam in the Concrete Jungle Colin Bisset

    What’s in a Girl? Kali Myers

    How Could You Do This to Us? Christine Hill

    ‘The world may be large, but it is also round’ Brendan Casey

    On Nostalgia Julia Kindt

    The Song Remains the Same by Andrew Ford and Anni Heino

Contents

* Contents derived from the 2018 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
And the Bright Morning Comesi"Is this the hollowness of my father’s death?", Nakamura Sachiko , Cassandra Atherton (translator), Rina Kikuchi (translator), single work poetry (p. 10-12)
A Magpie’s Flight, Andrew Hunter , single work prose

'The street was lined by violet. The beautiful monotone corridor emerged at around the same time each year, lingered for a few days then disappeared. The jacaranda trees remained prominent, but robbed of the ephemeral purple blanket spread across the footpath, the street returned to its usual status as a pleasant rather than breathtaking vista.'  (Introduction)

(p. 13-14)
Australia in Three Books, Justine Hyde , single work review
— Review of Loaded Christos Tsiolkas , 1995 single work novel ; Suck My Toes Fiona McGregor , 1994 selected work short story ; The Monkey's Mask Dorothy Porter , 1994 single work novel ;

'Literature is a reflection of the culture that spawns it. As a queer teenager growing up in Sydney’s outer western suburbs, my access to literature was limited to the books we had at home—airport novels—and the small collection at my high school library, mostly classics. So far as I knew, old white men wrote books; Ruth Park, Ursula Le Guin, Virginia Andrews and Danielle Steele were the exceptions.' (Introduction)

(p. 21-24)
Ragdoll Cati"This is a mausoleum of the sleeping.", Maria Takolander , single work poetry (p. 28)
Lost for Words: A Tribute to a Friend, Katharine Murphy , single work essay

'On the Saturday my friend dived into his beloved surf for the last time I was closeted away on Canberra’s limestone plains, landlocked, writing. Over the Christmas break I’d fully disconnected, hoping to gather some thoughts about where journalism had landed, or failed to land, after ten years of constant change, and then massage them into publishable form. That weekend was the last big push to get the words right.'  (Introduction)

(p. 30-33)
Tram 19 Rebels, Randa Abdel-Fattah , single work short story

'We were waiting at the tram stop on Sydney Road when the traffic light turned red. An old bottle-green Corolla stopped in front of us, a bunch of white guys inside. ‘Informer’ was blasting from their stereo system. I stifled a groan. One of them leant out of the car window, staring straight ahead at us. He locked eyes with Elif, who was standing beside me.' (Introduction)

(p. 34-39)
Time Machinationsi"If the machine that could reverse age", Hazel Smith , single work poetry (p. 53)
Whose Land Is It? : Recentring Aboriginal Voices in Our Search for a Home, Timmah Ball , single work essay

'Through the thin plaster wall I can hear her breathing in the adjacent bedroom. Most nights it’s a faint hum but occasionally her breath morphs into a gravelly snore that is slightly alleviated by earplugs. Living with my mother triggers intimacies I wasn’t expecting, but also deepens our relationship. Coffees before work and conversations in the courtyard pull us even closer. But there is a small feeling that I am doing something unacceptable. Returning home at 33 is often considered strange, like something went wrong. When the writer Maggie Nelson contemplated living with her mother she wrote, ‘I flashed momentarily upon the ghastly scene in the French film The Piano Teacher in which Isabelle Huppert sleeps nightly with her mother in the same bed’. ' (Introduction)

(p. 54-61)
Axisi"One sulphurous puff, then the white stick", John Hawke , single work poetry (p. 60)
World Service, Beejay Silcox , single work short story

'If this were a story, it would start with an argument. It would start with Ben and me arguing about something vaguely prescient, something to give the thing that happened a kind of existential echo—a child we wanted to have, or couldn’t have, or used to have. That would work. But the truth is we never wanted children. The truth is that when it happened we were listening to the BBC World Service on the car radio. Two ex-pats and the staticky scraps of empire, the sky heavy with desert grit and dawdling bats.' (Introduction)

(p. 77-79)
Ivyi"Something is taking over the bush", Sarah Day , single work poetry (p. 80-81)
Coppering, Alice Bishop , single work autobiography

'About three months after Black Saturday dad and I drove up to the place where our house used to be. Anything left (and there wasn’t much) was still bushfire blackened or, if not, the dark colours of rained-on rust. The forgotten wrecks of a couple of our neighbours’ cars and burnt-out back-yard sheds lay untouched—dotted like abandoned cicada cases across the ridge. The only green was in the still-standing gums’ trunk bases, sprouting clusters of seemingly out-of-place leaves.'  (Introduction)

(p. 82-87)
No Mistakesi"Today the morning rang me at 6.15", Kevin Brophy , single work poetry (p. 85)
Twicei"I think about you, mother,", Fiona Wright , single work poetry (p. 121)
Diagnosisi"Cancer now a song sung low: melody’s long exhale", Kate Middleton , single work poetry (p. 127)
Clementine of the Future, Emily O'Grady , single work short story

'April got out flour from the cupboard, cracked eggs into a bowl. She read the recipe, read it again, although she’d made the dish many times before. Each afternoon when she got home from work she made pasta from scratch, whole-baked fish, slow-cooked tagines with preserved lemon. April had known nothing about searing meat or the right way to chop an onion until well into adulthood. Her own mother hated cooking, and April and Pip had grown up on meat and three veg, Chinese takeaway on Friday nights. But now April found the incremental amassing of basic skills to be satisfying, like collecting tiny nuggets of gold.' (Introduction)

(p. 128-136)
The Murnane File : A Memoir, Carmel Bird , single work biography

'When my daughter was a baby I knitted for her a pair of woollen bootees in red, green and yellow stripes. I liked them so much I kept them safely and sentimentally for 40 years. But in the end I was defeated by moths. The bootees are now just a tragic bundle of bright, broken stitches, a cluster of airy spaces held together by scrappy twists of coloured wool. They are perhaps also a kind of description of memory, a flawed tangle of broken threads, having the power to stimulate vivid images and deep emotions that have lain cradled in mystery for years and years, clouded by the wash of daily events, day after day after day.' (Introduction)

(p. 137-147)
Lit Up Magnificentlyi"The dead (a simple fact)", M. T. C. Cronin , Peter Boyle , single work poetry (p. 143)
It’s a Parent’s Job to Become Redundant, Catherine Deveny , single work essay

'My first question to him at six-thirty this morning was, ‘Have you taken your antibiotics?’

'His first question to me was, ‘When I take money out of the ATM in Japan do I choose yen or Australian dollars?’

'Today my firstborn, Dom, and I ran through another of the many crepe paper banners, of parenting for me, and being an adult for him.' (Introduction)

(p. 148-151)
Namatjira Project : What Is It That We Are Not Seeing?, Scott Rankin , single work column

'Late in 2017, just weeks after successfully negotiating the return of Albert’s copyright to the Namatjira family, helping to set up the Namatjira Trust and bringing Big hART’s eight-year Namatjira Project to a conclusion, producer Sophia Marinos and I found ourselves in tears as we penned an obituary for our dear friend Kumantjai L Namatjira,* who had been so instrumental to the campaign.'  (Introduction)

(p. 152-158)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Stop Maiming the Gift of Aboriginal Languages Celeste Liddle , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: Eureka Street , 3 June vol. 28 no. 11 2018;

'The oft quoted, and misquoted, line from Romeo and Juliet which formed a big part of my undergraduate drama education still creeps in from time to time when pondering the perils of nomenclature in contemporary Australia. For despite any idealistic declarations of love the teenaged Juliet may have made, they both end up dead in the end (spoilers!) and the final message is clearly that no, misnamed roses don't actually always smell as sweet.' (Introduction)

Stop Maiming the Gift of Aboriginal Languages Celeste Liddle , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: Eureka Street , 3 June vol. 28 no. 11 2018;

'The oft quoted, and misquoted, line from Romeo and Juliet which formed a big part of my undergraduate drama education still creeps in from time to time when pondering the perils of nomenclature in contemporary Australia. For despite any idealistic declarations of love the teenaged Juliet may have made, they both end up dead in the end (spoilers!) and the final message is clearly that no, misnamed roses don't actually always smell as sweet.' (Introduction)

Last amended 27 Jun 2018 08:07:54
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