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y separately published work icon Catching Teller Crow single work   novel   young adult  
Issue Details: First known date: 2018... 2018 Catching Teller Crow
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Nothing's been the same for Beth Teller since she died. Her dad, a detective, is the only one who can see and hear her—and he's drowning in grief. But now they have a mystery to solve together. As it unravels, Beth finds a shocking story lurking beneath the surface of a small town, and a friendship that lasts beyond one life and into another. Told in two unforgettable voices, this gripping novel weaves together themes of grief, colonial history, violence, love and family.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Exhibitions

17218163
17024111
19691518
19567105

Teaching Resources

Teaching Resources

This work has teaching resources.

Teachers' notes from publisher's website.

Notes

  • Chosen for the 2019 White Ravens list.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Crows Nest, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 2018 .
      image of person or book cover 3382230545663360676.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 208p.
      Note/s:
      • Published September 2018.

      ISBN: 9781760631628
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Knopf ,
      2019 .
      image of person or book cover 2320103111222775807.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Alternative title: The Things She's Seen
      Extent: 208p.p.
      Edition info: 1st American ed.
      Note/s:
      • Published 14 May 2019.

      ISBN: 9781984848789
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Penguin Books ,
      2019 .
      image of person or book cover 221026259085719917.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 208p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 2 May 2019.

      ISBN: 9780241380079, 0241380073
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Ember ,
      2021 .
      image of person or book cover 6971510495527695282.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 197p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 23 February 2021.
      ISBN: 9781984849533, 1984849530
Alternative title: Lo contrario del gris
Language: Spanish
    • Madrid,
      c
      Spain,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Ediciones SM ,
      2019 .
      image of person or book cover 5350341148460045646.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 191p.
      Note/s:
      • Published September 2019.
      ISBN: 9788413181714, 8413181712

Other Formats

  • Sound recording.
  • Dyslexic edition
  • Large print.

Works about this Work

Reading and Viewing : [Indigenous Texts for Year 7 - 10] Deborah McPherson , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: English in Australia , vol. 54 no. 1 2019; (p. 76-82)
And Still the Birds Sing Karen Wyld , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin , Winter vol. 78 no. 2 2019; (p. 188-191)

— Review of The White Girl Tony Birch , 2019 single work novel ; Terra Nullius Claire G. Coleman , 2017 single work novel ; Catching Teller Crow Ambelin Kwaymullina , Ezekiel Kwaymullina , 2018 single work novel ; Too Much Lip Melissa Lucashenko , 2018 single work novel

'As some recently published works have shown, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander storytellers are continuing to embrace fiction-writing as a vessel for speaking truth to power. Constantly branching out into new genres—experimenting, fusing, transforming—there’s a noticeable increase in First Peoples speculative fiction being published in Australia.

With each line across the page, the colonial grip on the continent loosens. Fingers unclasp, story by story. Not all of these stories are from deep time—some are reimagined or even newly born—but they all carry power. Story-trails weave across paper and screen towards a common destination: truth-telling.'  (Introduction)

Respect, Relationships, Renewal : Aboriginal Perspectives on the Worlds of Tomorrow Ambelin Kwaymullina , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Westerly , vol. 64 no. 1 2019; (p. 121-134)
'I am an author of Indigenous Futurisms, a phrase coined by Aninishaabe academic Grace Dillon to describe a form of storytelling whereby Indigenous authors use the speculative fiction genre to challenge colonialism and imagine Indigenous futures (1–3). Indigenous Futurisms present both challenges and opportunities for Indigenous storytellers as we speak our truths to the settler-states—and the settler literacies—that were created out of, and continue to benefit from, our dispossession.' (Introduction)
Local Voices on the Global Stage : International Rights Sales of Indigenous-authored Books Sarah Farquharson , 2019 single work column
— Appears in: Books + Publishing , March vol. 98 no. 1 2019; (p. 5)

'Are we entering a growth period for international rights sales of Indigenous-authored books for young people? Sarah Farquharson reports.'

[Review] Catching Teller Crow Eugen Bacon , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Aurealis , no. 116 2018; (p. 53-54)

— Review of Catching Teller Crow Ambelin Kwaymullina , Ezekiel Kwaymullina , 2018 single work novel
Ambelin Kwaymullina & Ezekiel Kwaymullina : Catching Teller Crow KN , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 8-14 September 2018;

— Review of Catching Teller Crow Ambelin Kwaymullina , Ezekiel Kwaymullina , 2018 single work novel

'Ambelin Kwaymullina and Ezekiel Kwaymullina are a sister-and-brother team of Aboriginal writers who come from the Palyku people of the Pilbara region of Western Australia. Catching Teller Crow isn’t their first collaborative effort, but it is their first young-adult novel. A fusion of ghost story and crime thriller, it also combines poetry and fiction to striking and exciting effect.' (Introduction)

[Review] Catching Teller Crow Eugen Bacon , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Aurealis , no. 116 2018; (p. 53-54)

— Review of Catching Teller Crow Ambelin Kwaymullina , Ezekiel Kwaymullina , 2018 single work novel
And Still the Birds Sing Karen Wyld , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin , Winter vol. 78 no. 2 2019; (p. 188-191)

— Review of The White Girl Tony Birch , 2019 single work novel ; Terra Nullius Claire G. Coleman , 2017 single work novel ; Catching Teller Crow Ambelin Kwaymullina , Ezekiel Kwaymullina , 2018 single work novel ; Too Much Lip Melissa Lucashenko , 2018 single work novel

'As some recently published works have shown, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander storytellers are continuing to embrace fiction-writing as a vessel for speaking truth to power. Constantly branching out into new genres—experimenting, fusing, transforming—there’s a noticeable increase in First Peoples speculative fiction being published in Australia.

With each line across the page, the colonial grip on the continent loosens. Fingers unclasp, story by story. Not all of these stories are from deep time—some are reimagined or even newly born—but they all carry power. Story-trails weave across paper and screen towards a common destination: truth-telling.'  (Introduction)

Local Voices on the Global Stage : International Rights Sales of Indigenous-authored Books Sarah Farquharson , 2019 single work column
— Appears in: Books + Publishing , March vol. 98 no. 1 2019; (p. 5)

'Are we entering a growth period for international rights sales of Indigenous-authored books for young people? Sarah Farquharson reports.'

Respect, Relationships, Renewal : Aboriginal Perspectives on the Worlds of Tomorrow Ambelin Kwaymullina , 2019 single work essay
— Appears in: Westerly , vol. 64 no. 1 2019; (p. 121-134)
'I am an author of Indigenous Futurisms, a phrase coined by Aninishaabe academic Grace Dillon to describe a form of storytelling whereby Indigenous authors use the speculative fiction genre to challenge colonialism and imagine Indigenous futures (1–3). Indigenous Futurisms present both challenges and opportunities for Indigenous storytellers as we speak our truths to the settler-states—and the settler literacies—that were created out of, and continue to benefit from, our dispossession.' (Introduction)
Reading and Viewing : [Indigenous Texts for Year 7 - 10] Deborah McPherson , 2019 single work criticism
— Appears in: English in Australia , vol. 54 no. 1 2019; (p. 76-82)
Last amended 11 Nov 2021 14:43:45
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