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y separately published work icon Traumata single work   autobiography  
Issue Details: First known date: 2018... 2018 Traumata
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'In this extraordinary book, Meera Atkinson explores the ways trauma reverberates over a lifetime, unearthing the traumatic roots of our social structures and our collective history.

'Using memoir as a touchstone, Atkinson contemplates the causes of trauma and the scars it leaves on modern society. She vibrantly captures her early life in 1970s and ’80s Sydney and her self-reflection leads the reader on a journey that takes in neuroscience, pop psychology, feminist theory and much more.

'Searing in its truthfulness and beauty, Traumata deals with issues of our time – intergenerational trauma, family violence, alcoholism, child abuse, patriarchy – forging a path of fearless enquiry through the complexity of humanity.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Notes

  • Creative non-fiction.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

What I’m Reading Roz Bellamy , 2021 single work column
— Appears in: Meanjin Online 2021;
Women Who Write About Their Feelings and Lives Jocelyn Hungerford , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , May 2019;

— Review of Traumata Meera Anne Atkinson , 2018 single work autobiography ; Do Oysters Get Bored? A Curious Life Rozanna Lilley , 2018 selected work essay

'In her groundbreaking 1988 study of women’s biography Writing a Woman’s Life, literary scholar Carolyn Heilbrun wrote:

Feminist criticism, scholarship, and theory have gone further in the last two decades than I, even in my most intense time of hope, could have envisioned. Yet I find myself today profoundly worried about the dissemination of these important new ideas to the general body of women.'  (Introduction)

Writing Trauma’s Cyclical Hauntings Michael Richardson , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , October vol. 22 no. 2 2018;

— Review of Traumata Meera Anne Atkinson , 2018 single work autobiography ; The Poetics of Transgenerational Trauma Meera Anne Atkinson , 2017 multi chapter work criticism

'Published less than a year apart, Meera Atkinson’s two new books make a profound and original contribution to the study of trauma in the humanities and creative writing practice, as well as the wider public conversation about its rippling effects upon lives and across generations. Traumata (UQP 2018) and The Poetics of Transgenerational Trauma (Bloomsbury 2017) are very different works, one a creative non-fiction account of growing up and living with trauma and the other an academic inquiry into the literary poetics of trauma transmitted from one generation to another. Yet the two books traverse similar terrain in search of answers to similar questions: how does trauma move from one body to another and across time? How is it shaped and changed by the actions of living, the structures of oppression within which it operates and the slow, arduous efforts of survivors to recover? How might language bring forth that most resistant of experiences, the traumatic?'  (Introduction)

Wildy Hybrid : An Interview with Meera Atkinson Tamara Lazaroff (interviewer), 2018 single work interview
— Appears in: Verity La , September 2018;

'Meera Atkinson writes across genres — creative nonfiction, memoir, fiction, hybrid, poetry, essays, scholarly, songs — and over the last ten years her work has been particularly focussed on the subject of trauma, individual and collective. In 2017, her academic monograph, The Poetics of Transgenerational Trauma, was published by Bloomsbury Academic. In 2007, her essay ‘The Exiled Child’ was shortlisted for The Alfred Deakin Prize for an Essay Advancing Public Debate, Victorian Premier’s Awards. Earlier this year, Atkinson’s timely memoir-based book, Traumata, was published by UQP. Melding together personal story and interdisciplinary subjects as broad as neuroscience, pop psychology, feminist theory and philosophy, Traumata illustrates and interrogates the wider context of our society’s structures and wounds.'

Source: Magazine blurb.

Traumarchy Ceridwen Spark , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 403 2018; (p. 54-55)

— Review of Traumata Meera Anne Atkinson , 2018 single work autobiography

'At first glance, Traumata seems to provide an exception to the rule not to judge a book by its cover. Featuring photos of the author’s mother, a woman in her forties, alongside photos of the young Atkinson on the precipice of adolescence, the cover portrays the filial relationship that is central in this memoir. But Atkinson’s exploration is much more kaleidoscopic than the cover suggests. While the familial bonds and betrayal hinted at in these pictures are evident in the book, the author is chiefly concerned with what lies outside the frame: namely, the social forces that shape our selves and our intimate relationships.' (Introduction)

Traumarchy Ceridwen Spark , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 403 2018; (p. 54-55)

— Review of Traumata Meera Anne Atkinson , 2018 single work autobiography

'At first glance, Traumata seems to provide an exception to the rule not to judge a book by its cover. Featuring photos of the author’s mother, a woman in her forties, alongside photos of the young Atkinson on the precipice of adolescence, the cover portrays the filial relationship that is central in this memoir. But Atkinson’s exploration is much more kaleidoscopic than the cover suggests. While the familial bonds and betrayal hinted at in these pictures are evident in the book, the author is chiefly concerned with what lies outside the frame: namely, the social forces that shape our selves and our intimate relationships.' (Introduction)

Writing Trauma’s Cyclical Hauntings Michael Richardson , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , October vol. 22 no. 2 2018;

— Review of Traumata Meera Anne Atkinson , 2018 single work autobiography ; The Poetics of Transgenerational Trauma Meera Anne Atkinson , 2017 multi chapter work criticism

'Published less than a year apart, Meera Atkinson’s two new books make a profound and original contribution to the study of trauma in the humanities and creative writing practice, as well as the wider public conversation about its rippling effects upon lives and across generations. Traumata (UQP 2018) and The Poetics of Transgenerational Trauma (Bloomsbury 2017) are very different works, one a creative non-fiction account of growing up and living with trauma and the other an academic inquiry into the literary poetics of trauma transmitted from one generation to another. Yet the two books traverse similar terrain in search of answers to similar questions: how does trauma move from one body to another and across time? How is it shaped and changed by the actions of living, the structures of oppression within which it operates and the slow, arduous efforts of survivors to recover? How might language bring forth that most resistant of experiences, the traumatic?'  (Introduction)

Women Who Write About Their Feelings and Lives Jocelyn Hungerford , 2019 single work review
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , May 2019;

— Review of Traumata Meera Anne Atkinson , 2018 single work autobiography ; Do Oysters Get Bored? A Curious Life Rozanna Lilley , 2018 selected work essay

'In her groundbreaking 1988 study of women’s biography Writing a Woman’s Life, literary scholar Carolyn Heilbrun wrote:

Feminist criticism, scholarship, and theory have gone further in the last two decades than I, even in my most intense time of hope, could have envisioned. Yet I find myself today profoundly worried about the dissemination of these important new ideas to the general body of women.'  (Introduction)

[Review] Traumata JR , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 9-15 June 2018;

'Traumata is about many things. It’s about a dimly recalled sexual assault by a paedophile neighbour. It’s about an absent father, an abusive stepfather and a neglectful mother with what sounds like borderline personality disorder. It’s about rape. It’s about being groped by a much-admired uncle. It’s about heroin and speed and paranoia and thoughts of suicide. It’s about broken relationships and a long parade of therapists.'  (Introduction)

Finding Hope in Shared Struggle After Trauma Zoe Krupka , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: Eureka Street , 17 June vol. 28 no. 12 2018;

'In a sea of recovery memoirs, each one more determined than the next to provide a blueprint for how to recover from the unspeakable, Meera Atkinson's recently released Traumata stands out like a welcome sore thumb.' (Introduction)

Traumarchy Ceridwen Spark , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 403 2018; (p. 54-55)

— Review of Traumata Meera Anne Atkinson , 2018 single work autobiography

'At first glance, Traumata seems to provide an exception to the rule not to judge a book by its cover. Featuring photos of the author’s mother, a woman in her forties, alongside photos of the young Atkinson on the precipice of adolescence, the cover portrays the filial relationship that is central in this memoir. But Atkinson’s exploration is much more kaleidoscopic than the cover suggests. While the familial bonds and betrayal hinted at in these pictures are evident in the book, the author is chiefly concerned with what lies outside the frame: namely, the social forces that shape our selves and our intimate relationships.' (Introduction)

Wildy Hybrid : An Interview with Meera Atkinson Tamara Lazaroff (interviewer), 2018 single work interview
— Appears in: Verity La , September 2018;

'Meera Atkinson writes across genres — creative nonfiction, memoir, fiction, hybrid, poetry, essays, scholarly, songs — and over the last ten years her work has been particularly focussed on the subject of trauma, individual and collective. In 2017, her academic monograph, The Poetics of Transgenerational Trauma, was published by Bloomsbury Academic. In 2007, her essay ‘The Exiled Child’ was shortlisted for The Alfred Deakin Prize for an Essay Advancing Public Debate, Victorian Premier’s Awards. Earlier this year, Atkinson’s timely memoir-based book, Traumata, was published by UQP. Melding together personal story and interdisciplinary subjects as broad as neuroscience, pop psychology, feminist theory and philosophy, Traumata illustrates and interrogates the wider context of our society’s structures and wounds.'

Source: Magazine blurb.

What I’m Reading Roz Bellamy , 2021 single work column
— Appears in: Meanjin Online 2021;
Last amended 1 May 2018 10:10:04
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