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y separately published work icon The Yellow House single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 2018... 2018 The Yellow House
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Even before I knew anything about Granddad Les, Wally and me sometimes dared each other to see how close to the knackery we could get. It was way out in the bottom paddock, and Dad had banned us from going further than the dam. Wally said it was because the whole paddock was haunted. He said he could see ghosts wisping in the grass like sheets blown from the washing line. But even then I knew for sure that was a lie.

'Ten-year-old Cub lives with her parents, older brother Cassie, and twin brother Wally on a lonely property bordering an abandoned cattle farm and knackery. Their lives are shadowed by the infamous actions of her Granddad Les in his yellow weatherboard house, just over the fence.

'Although Les died twelve years ago, his notoriety has grown in Cub's lifetime and the local community have ostracised the whole family.

'When Cub's estranged aunt Helena and cousin Tilly move next door into the yellow house, the secrets the family want to keep buried begin to bubble to the surface. And having been kept in the dark about her grandfather's crimes, Cub is now forced to come to terms with her family's murky history.

'The Yellow House is a powerful novel about loyalty and betrayal; about the legacies of violence and the possibilities of redemption.' (Publication summary)

Notes

  • Dedication: For Peter Iliff

  • Other formats: Also large print.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Crows Nest, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 2018 .
      image of person or book cover 7865845864218252486.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 324p.p.
      Reprinted: Mar 2019 (paperback)
      Note/s:
      • Published May 2018.

      ISBN: 9781760632854

Works about this Work

The Yellow House by Emily O’Grady Jay Daniel Thompson , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , October no. 405 2018; (p. 58)

'Cub lives next door to the yellow house. The girl also lives in the shadow of her grandfather, Les, who once owned that property, and who died years ago, after doing ‘ugly things’ to women. Indeed, Les’s crimes seem to cast a pall over Cub’s entire family. This is a family where warmth is in short supply. The parents speak in harsh, defensive tones. They refuse to discuss Les’s misdemeanours. Also, Cub’s parents refuse to allow their children to grow their hair, and react violently when this rule is disobeyed. Then Ian, a young man who is obsessed with Les, befriends Cub’s brother.' (Introduction)

Vogel Literary Prize Awarded to Brisbane Author Emily O'Grady Alice Matthews , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: ABC News [Online] , April 2018;

'A 10-year-old girl lives with her family on an abandoned cattle farm and knackery.

'She discovers her grandfather was a serial killer.

'That was the idea behind The Yellow House — the novel that won 26-year-old Brisbane author Emily O'Grady the prestigious Vogel Literary Award.' 

Emily O’Grady : The Yellow House JD , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 19-25 May 2018;

'Rural misery is a mainstay of Australian fiction, and a genre beloved of (usually city-based) prize committees. It’s unsurprising, then, to find this year’s Vogel winner landing squarely in the category. But when a promising 26-year-old writer chooses to present the country in such a nihilistic fashion, the result is dispiriting. Why are urbane Australian writers so focused on unhappiness? Is it born of guilt at growing up in a kind of paradise?'  (Introduction)

Emily O’Grady : The Yellow House JD , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 19-25 May 2018;

'Rural misery is a mainstay of Australian fiction, and a genre beloved of (usually city-based) prize committees. It’s unsurprising, then, to find this year’s Vogel winner landing squarely in the category. But when a promising 26-year-old writer chooses to present the country in such a nihilistic fashion, the result is dispiriting. Why are urbane Australian writers so focused on unhappiness? Is it born of guilt at growing up in a kind of paradise?'  (Introduction)

Vogel Literary Prize Awarded to Brisbane Author Emily O'Grady Alice Matthews , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: ABC News [Online] , April 2018;

'A 10-year-old girl lives with her family on an abandoned cattle farm and knackery.

'She discovers her grandfather was a serial killer.

'That was the idea behind The Yellow House — the novel that won 26-year-old Brisbane author Emily O'Grady the prestigious Vogel Literary Award.' 

The Yellow House by Emily O’Grady Jay Daniel Thompson , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , October no. 405 2018; (p. 58)

'Cub lives next door to the yellow house. The girl also lives in the shadow of her grandfather, Les, who once owned that property, and who died years ago, after doing ‘ugly things’ to women. Indeed, Les’s crimes seem to cast a pall over Cub’s entire family. This is a family where warmth is in short supply. The parents speak in harsh, defensive tones. They refuse to discuss Les’s misdemeanours. Also, Cub’s parents refuse to allow their children to grow their hair, and react violently when this rule is disobeyed. Then Ian, a young man who is obsessed with Les, befriends Cub’s brother.' (Introduction)

Last amended 12 Nov 2018 09:49:31
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