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Issue Details: First known date: 2018... 2018 Reflecting on Indigenous Worlds, Indigenous Futurisms and Artificial Intelligence
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'I am a Palyku author of Indigenous Futurisms, a term coined by Anishinaabe academic Grace Dillon to describe a form of storytelling whereby Indigenous peoples use the speculative fiction genre to challenge colonialism and imagine Indigenous futures. Indigenous Futurist writers draw from worldviews shaped by our ancient cultures, from our inheritance of the multigenerational trauma of colonialism, and from the sophisticated understandings of systems of oppression that are part of the knowledge base of all oppressed peoples. Because of this, we share similarities that shape our works and provide a fruitful base for cross-textual analysis. But because we are many individuals from many Indigenous nations, each with our own homelands, cultures, and identities, there is also great diversity between us all. As such, my viewpoint is one among many Indigenous viewpoints.' (Introduction)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Mother of Invention Tansy Rayner Roberts (editor), Rivqa Rafael (editor), Australia : Twelfth Planet Press , 2018 12913318 2018 anthology short story essay

    'An ambitious anthology from award-winning Australian publishing house Twelfth Planet Press, Mother of Invention will feature diverse, challenging stories about gender as it relates to the creation of artificial intelligence and robotics.

    'From Pygmalion and Galatea to Frankenstein, Ex Machina and Person of Interest, the fictional landscape so often frames cisgender men as the creators of artificial life, leading to the same kinds of stories being told over and over. We want to bring some genuine revolution to the way that artificial intelligence stories are told, and how they intersect with gender identity, parenthood, sexuality, war, and the future of our species. How can we interrogate the gendered assumptions around the making of robots compared with the making of babies? Can computers learn to speak in a code beyond the (gender) binary?

    'If necessity is the mother of invention, what exciting AI might come to exist in the hands of a more diverse range of innovators?'

    Source: Publisher's blurb.

    Australia : Twelfth Planet Press , 2018
    pg. 177-186
    Note:

    Published on the publisher's website as a preview to the release of the anthology.

Last amended 1 Aug 2018 08:00:47
177-186 http://motherofinvention.twelfthplanetpress.com/2017/09/16/reflecting-on-indigenous-worlds-indigenous-futurisms-and-artificial-intelligence/ Reflecting on Indigenous Worlds, Indigenous Futurisms and Artificial Intelligencesmall AustLit logo
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