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y separately published work icon Millefiori selected work   poetry  
Issue Details: First known date: 2017... 2017 Millefiori
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'A collection of love poems and fierce raps, Millefiori is Omar Musa's third book of poetry. Both dream-like and gritty, it also includes gorgeous illustrations and draft poems from Musa's notebook. Heartbreak, cocaine, colonial violence, memory and cave paintings: this is a world full of unbearable beauty and brutality.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Anthems, ‘Ranthems’, and Otherwise Loves: Nationalism in Australian Poetry Kevin Brophy , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: The Conversation , 24 January 24 2017;

'A young woman of 23, Dorothea MacKellar (1885-1968), had a poem published in the London Spectator in 1908, titled 'Core of My Heart'. She was the daughter of a wealthy pastoral family, educated privately, a graduate of the University of Sydney. She is said to have written the first draft of the poem in 1905 in response to the breaking of a prolonged drought on the family cattle and tobacco farming property, Torryburn, near Maitland in NSW. The poem was also written in protest against the anti-Australianism of many Australians at that time, excoriating them for their nostalgic love of English “grey-blue” landscapes and English weather.' (Introduction)

[Review] Millefiori KN , 2017 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 2-8 December no. 185 2017;

— Review of Millefiori Omar Musa , 2017 selected work poetry

'If your problem with rap is that you can’t hear the words – or you think you won’t want to – Omar Musa’s new poetry collection Millefiori might change your mind. Musa is a Malaysian-Australian rapper, with two solo records, but he is also an accomplished novelist – Here Come the Dogs was longlisted for the Miles Franklin – and the author of two earlier poetry books.' (Introduction)

Omar Musa: Genocide Is the Basis for Racism in Australia Naaman Zhou , 2017 single work review essay
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 30 November 2017;

'Being a migrant in Australia, according to the author, rapper and poet Omar Musa, is a lot like constantly applying for a visa to somewhere you already grew up. In twin releases due at the end of this month – a book of poetry, Millefiori, and a hip-hop album, Since Ali Died – Musa speaks of seeing too many non-white Australians caught out in the trap of the model minority: where you can spend your whole life trying to fit in, only to discover that some people never thought you belonged.' (Introduction)

[Review] Millefiori KN , 2017 single work review
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 2-8 December no. 185 2017;

— Review of Millefiori Omar Musa , 2017 selected work poetry

'If your problem with rap is that you can’t hear the words – or you think you won’t want to – Omar Musa’s new poetry collection Millefiori might change your mind. Musa is a Malaysian-Australian rapper, with two solo records, but he is also an accomplished novelist – Here Come the Dogs was longlisted for the Miles Franklin – and the author of two earlier poetry books.' (Introduction)

Omar Musa: Genocide Is the Basis for Racism in Australia Naaman Zhou , 2017 single work review essay
— Appears in: The Guardian Australia , 30 November 2017;

'Being a migrant in Australia, according to the author, rapper and poet Omar Musa, is a lot like constantly applying for a visa to somewhere you already grew up. In twin releases due at the end of this month – a book of poetry, Millefiori, and a hip-hop album, Since Ali Died – Musa speaks of seeing too many non-white Australians caught out in the trap of the model minority: where you can spend your whole life trying to fit in, only to discover that some people never thought you belonged.' (Introduction)

Anthems, ‘Ranthems’, and Otherwise Loves: Nationalism in Australian Poetry Kevin Brophy , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: The Conversation , 24 January 24 2017;

'A young woman of 23, Dorothea MacKellar (1885-1968), had a poem published in the London Spectator in 1908, titled 'Core of My Heart'. She was the daughter of a wealthy pastoral family, educated privately, a graduate of the University of Sydney. She is said to have written the first draft of the poem in 1905 in response to the breaking of a prolonged drought on the family cattle and tobacco farming property, Torryburn, near Maitland in NSW. The poem was also written in protest against the anti-Australianism of many Australians at that time, excoriating them for their nostalgic love of English “grey-blue” landscapes and English weather.' (Introduction)

Last amended 10 Dec 2018 12:46:21
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