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y separately published work icon The Everlasting Sunday single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 2018... 2018 The Everlasting Sunday
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'During the freezing English winter of 1962, seventeen-year-old Radford is sent to Goodwin Manor, a home for boys who have been 'found by trouble'. Drawn immediately to the charismatic West, Radford soon discovers that each one of them has something to hide. 

'Life at the Manor offers a refuge of sorts, but unexpected new arrivals threaten the fragile dynamics. Will the boys' friendship be enough when trouble finds them again?

'At once both beautiful and brutal, The Everlasting Sunday is a haunting debut novel about growing up, growing wild and what it takes to survive.  (Publication summary)

Notes

  • Author's note: To Easy

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Five Emerging Australian Authors Talk about Writing Their Breakthrough Novels Sarah L'Estrange , 2019 single work column
— Appears in: ABC News [Online] , January 2019;

'Some of Australia's best known authors managed to reach literary fame with their debut novels: Kate Grenville with Lilian's Story, which won the Vogel Literary Award in 1984; Richard Flanagan with Death of a River Guide, which won several awards, including the National Fiction Award in 1996; and Andrew McGahan with Praise, which won the Vogel in 1991.' (Introduction)

Found by Trouble Sophia Barnes , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , October 2018;

'The Everlasting Sunday is the first novel from Robert Lukins, a Melbourne writer with a background in journalism, and it’s an entirely distinctive debut: rich with atmosphere, beguiling in its blend of lyricism and quiet menace. Lukins has pointed to a year spent working as a village postman in Shropshire as his inspiration for the rural English setting, here cast in the stark monochrome of an unusually harsh winter. By contrast, the stories collected in Moreno Giovannoni’s Fireflies of Autumn: And Other Tales of San Ginese take place in the hills of Tuscany – a world coloured by turns in scorching sun and unrelenting fog. Giovannoni was born in San Ginese but grew up in rural Victoria, and has worked for many years as a freelance translator. The manuscript of Fireflies of Autumn was the first winner of the Deborah Z. Cass prize for writing by Australian writers from migrant backgrounds. The authors share a lyrical sensibility and a finely-tuned sense of how the fantastical and the mundane, the hopeful and the brutal, are woven together in the stories which define our communities.'  (Publication summary)

Masculinity in Deep Freeze Ellen Cregan , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Kill Your Darlings [Online] , March 2018;

'The winter of 1962–63 was one of England’s coldest on record. Also known as the Big Freeze of 1963, it brought with it unusually large snow drifts, left icicles hanging off houses, and caused lakes and rivers to freeze over. It is in the midst of this unforgiving winter that Robert Lukins has set his debut novel, The Everlasting Sunday. Seventeen-year-old Radford is sent away from his family to Goodwin Manor, a boarding school for young men who have found themselves on the wrong side of the law. Almost immediately, Radford is accepted by the other boys in the Manor as one of their kind, and is taken under the wing of his highly confident peer, West. All the boys at the Manor are troubled – their pasts have damaged them, and loom beneath the surface of their day to day lives. When an ex-resident of Goodwin Manor returns, he disrupts the relative harmony the boys have been living in, and causes irreparable damage to the refuge they have constructed for themselves.' (Introduction)

[Review] Everlasting Sunday Anna MacDonald , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , April no. 400 2018; (p. 63)

'Set in England during the Big Freeze of 1962–63 – the coldest winter in nearly 300 years – Robert Lukins’s first novel tells the story of Radford, who is sent to live at Goodwin Manor, ‘a place for boys who have been found by trouble’. The Manor is overseen by Teddy, a charismatic depressive, who resists pressure to establish a ‘philosophy’ of reform and instead determines ‘only to keep [the boys in his care] alive’.' (Introduction)

Robert Lukins The Everlasting Sunday SH , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 10-16 March 2018;

'In the winter of 1962, 17-year-old Radford is brought from London to Goodwin Manor, somewhere in the English Midlands. While we don’t know why Radford has been brought here, we learn that the manor is an institution for boys who have been “found by trouble”. He is taken to Teddy, the eccentric, kindly man in charge, who tells him practically nothing about the place, and who banishes another boy to the chicken coops to make room for him. Radford promptly gets swept up in the commotion of this lark as crowds of boys clear out the boy’s things and set them back up in the coops, and his first impression of the other residents, these marauding bodies and “sallow figures scoffing and competing”, is of a whirlwind of activity.' (Publication summary)

Robert Lukins The Everlasting Sunday SH , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 10-16 March 2018;

'In the winter of 1962, 17-year-old Radford is brought from London to Goodwin Manor, somewhere in the English Midlands. While we don’t know why Radford has been brought here, we learn that the manor is an institution for boys who have been “found by trouble”. He is taken to Teddy, the eccentric, kindly man in charge, who tells him practically nothing about the place, and who banishes another boy to the chicken coops to make room for him. Radford promptly gets swept up in the commotion of this lark as crowds of boys clear out the boy’s things and set them back up in the coops, and his first impression of the other residents, these marauding bodies and “sallow figures scoffing and competing”, is of a whirlwind of activity.' (Publication summary)

[Review] Everlasting Sunday Anna MacDonald , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , April no. 400 2018; (p. 63)

'Set in England during the Big Freeze of 1962–63 – the coldest winter in nearly 300 years – Robert Lukins’s first novel tells the story of Radford, who is sent to live at Goodwin Manor, ‘a place for boys who have been found by trouble’. The Manor is overseen by Teddy, a charismatic depressive, who resists pressure to establish a ‘philosophy’ of reform and instead determines ‘only to keep [the boys in his care] alive’.' (Introduction)

Masculinity in Deep Freeze Ellen Cregan , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Kill Your Darlings [Online] , March 2018;

'The winter of 1962–63 was one of England’s coldest on record. Also known as the Big Freeze of 1963, it brought with it unusually large snow drifts, left icicles hanging off houses, and caused lakes and rivers to freeze over. It is in the midst of this unforgiving winter that Robert Lukins has set his debut novel, The Everlasting Sunday. Seventeen-year-old Radford is sent away from his family to Goodwin Manor, a boarding school for young men who have found themselves on the wrong side of the law. Almost immediately, Radford is accepted by the other boys in the Manor as one of their kind, and is taken under the wing of his highly confident peer, West. All the boys at the Manor are troubled – their pasts have damaged them, and loom beneath the surface of their day to day lives. When an ex-resident of Goodwin Manor returns, he disrupts the relative harmony the boys have been living in, and causes irreparable damage to the refuge they have constructed for themselves.' (Introduction)

Found by Trouble Sophia Barnes , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , October 2018;

'The Everlasting Sunday is the first novel from Robert Lukins, a Melbourne writer with a background in journalism, and it’s an entirely distinctive debut: rich with atmosphere, beguiling in its blend of lyricism and quiet menace. Lukins has pointed to a year spent working as a village postman in Shropshire as his inspiration for the rural English setting, here cast in the stark monochrome of an unusually harsh winter. By contrast, the stories collected in Moreno Giovannoni’s Fireflies of Autumn: And Other Tales of San Ginese take place in the hills of Tuscany – a world coloured by turns in scorching sun and unrelenting fog. Giovannoni was born in San Ginese but grew up in rural Victoria, and has worked for many years as a freelance translator. The manuscript of Fireflies of Autumn was the first winner of the Deborah Z. Cass prize for writing by Australian writers from migrant backgrounds. The authors share a lyrical sensibility and a finely-tuned sense of how the fantastical and the mundane, the hopeful and the brutal, are woven together in the stories which define our communities.'  (Publication summary)

Five Emerging Australian Authors Talk about Writing Their Breakthrough Novels Sarah L'Estrange , 2019 single work column
— Appears in: ABC News [Online] , January 2019;

'Some of Australia's best known authors managed to reach literary fame with their debut novels: Kate Grenville with Lilian's Story, which won the Vogel Literary Award in 1984; Richard Flanagan with Death of a River Guide, which won several awards, including the National Fiction Award in 1996; and Andrew McGahan with Praise, which won the Vogel in 1991.' (Introduction)

Last amended 5 Dec 2018 17:41:50
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    England,
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    United Kingdom (UK),
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    Western Europe, Europe,
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