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y separately published work icon Dyschronia single work   novel   fantasy  
Issue Details: First known date: 2018... 2018 Dyschronia
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'One morning, the residents of a coastal small town wake to discover the sea has disappeared, leaving them 'landlocked'. However, the narrator has been seeing visions of this cataclysm for years. Is she a prophet? Does she have a disorder that skews her perception of time (the 'Dyschronia' of the title). Or is she just a liar?

'Mills' novel takes contemporary issues of resource depletion and climate change and welds them to one young woman's migraine-inducing nightmares. Her narrator's prevision anticipates a world where entire communities are left to fend for themselves: economically drained, socially fractured, trapped between a hardscrabble past and an uncertain future.' (Publication summary)

Exhibitions

14392775
15866155
15826549

Notes

  • Epigraph: Tell the emperor that my hall has fallen to the ground. Phoibos no longer has his house, nor his mantic bay, nor his prophetic spring; the water has dried up. -The Phthia's last oracle at Delphi, 362 AD.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Other Formats

  • Also large print.
  • Also dyslexic edition

Works about this Work

Grief, Racism and Uncertain Futures: Your Guide to the 2019 Miles Franklin Shortlist Jen Webb , 2019 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 30 July 2019;

'I think it’s fair to say that each year the selected novels on the Miles Franklin shortlist manifest the zeitgeist, reflecting on some of the issues that are troubling society.' (Introduction) 

Remembering the Future Helen Gildfind , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , October vol. 22 no. 2 2018;

— Review of Dyschronia Jennifer Mills , 2018 single work novel

'If the literary technique of ‘defamiliarisation’ is the usual means through which writers jolt people into seeing the world anew, how does a dystopian novelist shock us into seeing the environmental extremities of today, when ‘extremes’ are increasingly the norm? Furthermore, how can such a writer hope to contribute something original to our long tradition of dystopian fiction, and its rapidly growing sub-genre of ‘Cli-Fi’[1]? Jennifer Mills has taken on these challenges with her new novel, Dyschronia. This striking title refers to the novel’s structural and thematic preoccupation with temporal disorder, while cleverly alluding to both the novel’s genre and to the feeling of ‘dysphoria’ experienced by its protagonist, Sam (66) – that deep sense of ‘unease’ which provokes, and should be provoked by, dystopian stories.'  (Introduction)

The End of the World As We Know It Lucy Sussex , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , September 2018;

'From Armageddon to Ragnarok and the Rapture, humans persist in imagining the end of the world. The religious term is eschatology, and the literary terms are many. Some are jocular (Disaster Porn), or precisely denote a sub-genre (Post-Apocalypse, Solarpunk). Climate change or Anthropocene fiction is the latest variant on the theme, and if we believe our scientists — and woe betide us if we do not — these may be the final words. The end of the world as we know it approacheth, and nobody is feeling fine. Even the denialists feel the heat of the sand around their heads.'  (Introduction)

Climate Change Was so Last Year : Writers’ Festivals and the Great Derangement Ben Brooker , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Overland [Online] , September 2018;

'Every other day, it seems, a new controversy erupts around the programming decisions of one or another of Australia’s ever-proliferating literary festivals. If the object of outrage is not an unrepresentative panel discussion, it’s a politically contentious keynote, or else a disastrous clash between ill-suited speakers. Whatever the specifics, the regularity with which such brouhahas flare up speaks to our anxieties about what purpose literary festivals serve.'  (Introduction)

Jennifer Mills Astrid Edwards (interviewer), 2018 single work interview
— Appears in: The Garret : 2018 2018;

'In this interview, Jennifer discusses her writing process, reflects on her different approaches to fiction and non-fiction, and offers advice to emerging writers who are pitching to literary journals.'  (Introduction)

Civilisation Faces Tacit Test of Time Diane Stubbings , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 27 January 2018; (p. 19)

— Review of Dyschronia Jennifer Mills , 2018 single work novel

'Sam Warren wakes one morning to discover that her mother, Ivy, has broken into her house. It’s been years since Sam last saw her. Longer still since her mother walked out, 'saying she needed time, as if time wasn’t everywhere, seeping into every crevice'.' (Introduction)

[Review] Dyschronia Robert Goodman , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Aurealis , no. 109 2018;

— Review of Dyschronia Jennifer Mills , 2018 single work novel
Of Jennifer Mills, Dyschronia Jack Cameron Stanton , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Long Paddock , vol. 77 no. 3 2018;

— Review of Dyschronia Jennifer Mills , 2018 single work novel

'Reading this book transported me to the days when I read fiction before studying it, under tables at school, in the library, on the porch smoking cigarettes while my parents were sleeping, wondering how surreal yet possible all these fictional worlds seemed. I thought about this moment in my life while reading Dyschronia (2018) simply because devoting one’s life to learning how to write inevitably jeopardises the sense of mystery that one initially found alluring.' (Introduction)

Remembering the Future Helen Gildfind , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , October vol. 22 no. 2 2018;

— Review of Dyschronia Jennifer Mills , 2018 single work novel

'If the literary technique of ‘defamiliarisation’ is the usual means through which writers jolt people into seeing the world anew, how does a dystopian novelist shock us into seeing the environmental extremities of today, when ‘extremes’ are increasingly the norm? Furthermore, how can such a writer hope to contribute something original to our long tradition of dystopian fiction, and its rapidly growing sub-genre of ‘Cli-Fi’[1]? Jennifer Mills has taken on these challenges with her new novel, Dyschronia. This striking title refers to the novel’s structural and thematic preoccupation with temporal disorder, while cleverly alluding to both the novel’s genre and to the feeling of ‘dysphoria’ experienced by its protagonist, Sam (66) – that deep sense of ‘unease’ which provokes, and should be provoked by, dystopian stories.'  (Introduction)

Jennifer Mills : Dyschronia KN , 2018 single work column
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 27 January - 2 February 2018;

'In our era of climate change, prophecies about our future are commonplace. Scientists are our key prophets nowadays – though they are often repudiated or betrayed, like the religious prophets of old – but writers also increasingly offer their prognostications. Dyschronia, the third novel by the Australian writer Jennifer Mills, is another contribution to the future-oriented genre of cli-fi or climate-change fiction. Future gazing is also thematised by Mills’ novel.' (Introduction)

'A Crack in Its Earth' James Bradley , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , March no. 399 2018; (p. 38)

'Recent years have seen the literary novel begin to mutate, its boundaries and subject matter evolving in new and sometimes surprising directions as it attempts to accommodate the increasing weirdness of the world we inhabit.' (Introduction)

Layers of Now : Jennifer Mills’ Dyschronia Justine Hyde , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Kill Your Darlings [Online] , February 2018;

'A looping, surrealist vision of a small town wracked by climate change lays bare our collective myopia about the future.'

Jennifer Mills Astrid Edwards (interviewer), 2018 single work interview
— Appears in: The Garret : 2018 2018;

'In this interview, Jennifer discusses her writing process, reflects on her different approaches to fiction and non-fiction, and offers advice to emerging writers who are pitching to literary journals.'  (Introduction)

Climate Change Was so Last Year : Writers’ Festivals and the Great Derangement Ben Brooker , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Overland [Online] , September 2018;

'Every other day, it seems, a new controversy erupts around the programming decisions of one or another of Australia’s ever-proliferating literary festivals. If the object of outrage is not an unrepresentative panel discussion, it’s a politically contentious keynote, or else a disastrous clash between ill-suited speakers. Whatever the specifics, the regularity with which such brouhahas flare up speaks to our anxieties about what purpose literary festivals serve.'  (Introduction)

Last amended 3 Jul 2019 07:21:58
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