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Issue Details: First known date: 2015... 2015 Unsettling Sight : Judith Wright's Journey into History and Ecology on Mt Tamborine
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Mt Tamborine is a crucial location for Judith Wright's poetry, and for the development of her thought. She wrote the majority of her poetry collections while living on the mountain from 1948–75; it was there that she came face to face with the complexities of Australian ecologies and colonial histories. While her earlier poems from this period reflect a concerted, anti-colonial desire to separate the world of Tamborine from her European inheritance and perspective, by the early 1970s her work becomes preoccupied with symbiotic relationships between her body, her house and garden, and the surrounding landscape. This turn reflects broader shifts in thought in the mid-twentieth century, where notions of separation and precision were being problematised by the emerging field of quantum mechanics.'  (Publication abstract)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Queensland Review vol. 22 no. 2 December 2015 12016695 2015 periodical issue

    'Alfred Elliot's photograph on the cover of this themed issue is one of a series of images that captured Brisbane's reception for the Duke of York in 1927. The Duke, later King George VI, was in Australia to open the new Parliament House in Canberra. On glass plate, Elliot documented the decorated route of the royal procession. The cover image shows the centrepiece — an archway spanning Queen Street, which proclaims a ‘Citizen's Welcome’. Two decades earlier, this young immigrant had also photographed the crowd assembled in South Brisbane to vote in the 1899 Federation Referendum. Despite the establishment of the new Commonwealth of Australia in 1901, the citizens welcoming the Duke were still British. Modernity may have arrived in the shape of the automobile, but modern Australian citizenship was, and continues to be, a work in progress.'  (Editorial introduction)

    2015
    pg. 191-201

Works about this Work

‘Deep Hanging Out’ : Native Species Images and Affective Labour 2017 single work
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 1 2017;

'This paper investigates the affective labour done by, specifically, native species images in Australian poetry, using Judith Wright's bird poems, and various poems about kangaroos as example. It uses the anthropological term, "deep hanging out", borrowed from an article about fashion models, to extend the idea of affective labour, and to measure poems' attentions to birds and animals, and their relation to iconising as the work of nationalism. It is concerned with cultural capital, and Canberra, and the human empire.'  (Publication abstract)

‘Deep Hanging Out’ : Native Species Images and Affective Labour 2017 single work
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 1 2017;

'This paper investigates the affective labour done by, specifically, native species images in Australian poetry, using Judith Wright's bird poems, and various poems about kangaroos as example. It uses the anthropological term, "deep hanging out", borrowed from an article about fashion models, to extend the idea of affective labour, and to measure poems' attentions to birds and animals, and their relation to iconising as the work of nationalism. It is concerned with cultural capital, and Canberra, and the human empire.'  (Publication abstract)

Last amended 13 Oct 2017 12:01:03
191-201 Unsettling Sight : Judith Wright's Journey into History and Ecology on Mt Tamborinesmall AustLit logo Queensland Review
Subjects:
  • Mount Tamborine, Tamborine area, Beaudesert - Tamborine - Rathdowney area, South East Queensland, Queensland,
  • 1948-1975
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