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Issue Details: First known date: 2017... 6 September 2017 of The Conversation est. 2011 The Conversation
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* Contents derived from the 2017 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Can ‘cli-fi’ Actually Make a Difference? A Climate Scientist’s Perspective, Sarah Perkins-Kirkpartrick , 2017 single work essay

'Climate change - or global warming - is a term we are all familiar with. The warming of the Earth’s atmosphere due to the consumption of fossil fuels by human activity was predicted in the 19th century. It can be seen in the increase in global temperature from the industrial revolution onwards, and has been a central political issue for decades. 

'Climate scientists who moonlight as communicators tend to bombard their audiences with facts and figures - to convince them how rapidly our planet is warming - and scientific evidence demonstrating why we are to blame. A classic example is Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth, and its sequel, which are loaded with graphs and statistics. However, it is becoming ever clearer that these methods don’t work as well as we’d like. In fact, more often than not, we are preaching to the converted, and can further polarise those who accept the science from those who don’t.

'One way of potentially tapping into previously unreached audiences is via cli-fi, or climate-fiction. Cli-fi explores how the world may look in the process or aftermath of dealing with climate change, and not just that caused by burning fossil fuels.' (Introduction)

Heart-warming, Biting, Tragic, Funny: the Miles Franklin Shortlist Will Move You, Jen Webb , 2017 single work essay

'The 2017 Miles Franklin Award winner will be announced tonight, but I’m not taking bets on who it’s likely to be. Each shortlisted novel is by a first-time nominee. Each is of satisfyingly high literary quality and very different in voice, logic, focus and story.' (Introduction)

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Last amended 20 Sep 2017 10:42:30
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