AustLit logo
image of person or book cover 4087680068344008837.jpeg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
y separately published work icon Dancing Home single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 2017... 2017 Dancing Home
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

‘When he was in gaol, he’d begun to prepare himself for the fight of his life, a showdown with the policeman, McWilliams … he’d face life with death, and see who blinked first.’ 

'Blackie and Rips are fresh out of prison when they set off on a road trip back to Wiradjuri country with their mate Carlos. Blackie is out for revenge against the cop who put him in prison on false grounds. He is also craving to reconnect with his grandmother’s country. 

'Driven by his hunger for drugs and payback, Blackie reaches dark places of both mystery and beauty as he searches for peace. He is willing to pay for that peace with his own life. 

'Part road-movie, part ‘Koori-noir’, Dancing Home announces an original and darkly funny new voice.'

[source: Publisher's website]

Exhibitions

7740091

Notes

  • Dedication: For my brother Glenn, champion

    ...and, for all the Invisible people who live in the shadows.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

A Powerful View of Alienation Josie Arnold , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , April vol. 22 no. 1 2018;

'This novel provides a powerful view of alienation and its consequent positioning of Aboriginal blackness as always other. Whatever the terms of surrender, whiteness dominates and fairness remains an impossible goal. This novel opens with a strong narrative voice, including black jail-style dialogue. The ongoing observations are insightful and humorous, complementing the characterisation. The action and plot emphasise that the novel is the story of outsiders.' (Introduction)

[Review] Dancing Home Jay Daniel Thompson , 2017 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December no. 397 2017; (p. 43)

— Review of Dancing Home Paul Collis , 2017 single work novel

'Dancing Home opens in forthright fashion. The author, Paul Collis, urges readers to ‘[t]ake sides. Be involved in the ideas I’ve written into this book.’ The novel offers an uncompromising examination of some of the injustices faced by Indigenous Australians. The plot focuses on three men – Blackie, Rips, and Carlos – who have embarked on a road trip to Wiradjuri country. Blackie and Rips have recently been released from prison, where they met. Blackie is intent on enacting revenge against Hunter McWilliams, the white police officer who was responsible for his incarceration. Blackie whiled away his prison sentence ‘imagining how he would hurt the cop with every punch he threw’.' (Introduction)

[Review] Dancing Home Jay Daniel Thompson , 2017 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December no. 397 2017; (p. 43)

— Review of Dancing Home Paul Collis , 2017 single work novel

'Dancing Home opens in forthright fashion. The author, Paul Collis, urges readers to ‘[t]ake sides. Be involved in the ideas I’ve written into this book.’ The novel offers an uncompromising examination of some of the injustices faced by Indigenous Australians. The plot focuses on three men – Blackie, Rips, and Carlos – who have embarked on a road trip to Wiradjuri country. Blackie and Rips have recently been released from prison, where they met. Blackie is intent on enacting revenge against Hunter McWilliams, the white police officer who was responsible for his incarceration. Blackie whiled away his prison sentence ‘imagining how he would hurt the cop with every punch he threw’.' (Introduction)

A Powerful View of Alienation Josie Arnold , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , April vol. 22 no. 1 2018;

'This novel provides a powerful view of alienation and its consequent positioning of Aboriginal blackness as always other. Whatever the terms of surrender, whiteness dominates and fairness remains an impossible goal. This novel opens with a strong narrative voice, including black jail-style dialogue. The ongoing observations are insightful and humorous, complementing the characterisation. The action and plot emphasise that the novel is the story of outsiders.' (Introduction)

Last amended 10 Dec 2018 12:45:14
X