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Issue Details: First known date: 2017... 2017 Please Explain : The Rise, Fall and Rise Again of Pauline Hanson
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'In 1996, Pauline Hanson gave a speech that changed Australia. Attacking Asian and Indigenous people and foreign aid, Hanson unleashed a Pandora’s box of violence and division on the progressive country Prime Minister Keating had positioned as ‘part of Asia’. After her famous defeat in 1998, her political downfall seemed assured – but she stayed firmly in the spotlight, whether she was being locked up for electoral fraud or jiving on Dancing with the Stars. Now, after almost two decades in the political wilderness, Hanson is back and more powerful than ever. Before One Nation’s astonishingly successful return to Australian politics in 2016, multi-award-winning filmmaker Anna Broinowski had complete access to Hanson and her ‘Fed Up’ election campaign. Broinowski followed Hanson as she flew from Rockhampton to Sydney to Great Keppel Island and beyond in her Jabiru two-seater. The crazies, the madness, the division and the hatred Hanson attracts and inflames were all on show – sometimes funny, sometimes frightening, and often surreal. At the time, no one was taking Pauline Hanson and One Nation’s political chances seriously, but Broinowski quickly realised that there was a movement forming behind her. Pauline Hanson’s explosive political journey mirrors Australia’s own: from left-leaning multiculturalism, to the divided landscape we live in now. And, alongside the shocks of Brexit and Trump’s presidency, Hanson's resurrection reflects a broader global trend towards outrageous far-right outsiders.' (Publication Summary)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Tracing Pauline : Two New Books of One Nation Shaun Crowe , 2017 single work single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December no. 397 2017; (p. 11-12)

— Review of Please Explain : The Rise, Fall and Rise Again of Pauline Hanson Anna Broinowski , 2017 single work biography

'More than any other political party in Australia, One Nation represents a puzzle for commentators. When trying to explain its support – which has hovered around ten per cent since its revival in 2016 – the temptation is to look for subtext, something deeper, beneath the surface. Could the party’s cultural pitch really be a code for economic concerns, with immigration a metaphor for the genuine fear of international competition? Perhaps we are witnessing a new political coalition of those ‘left behind’ by social change, bound together by a suspicion of everything cosmopolitan. Or is One Nation simply a vehicle for those pissed off at a stagnant political order, hoping to unseat and humiliate its representatives? What really motivates the mythical One Nation voter?' (Introduction)

Ups and Downs of Persistent Pauline Ross Fitzgerald , 2017 single work review essay
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 16 September 2017; (p. 21)

'Anna Broinowski’s revealing documentary Pauline Hanson: Please Explain! ran on SBS television a year ago. Throughout 2015 the award-winning filmmaker had unfettered access to Hanson and her Fed Up campaign, as Hanson attempted to win a Queensland Senate seat at the 2016 federal election.' (Introduction)

Tracing Pauline : Two New Books of One Nation Shaun Crowe , 2017 single work single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December no. 397 2017; (p. 11-12)

— Review of Please Explain : The Rise, Fall and Rise Again of Pauline Hanson Anna Broinowski , 2017 single work biography

'More than any other political party in Australia, One Nation represents a puzzle for commentators. When trying to explain its support – which has hovered around ten per cent since its revival in 2016 – the temptation is to look for subtext, something deeper, beneath the surface. Could the party’s cultural pitch really be a code for economic concerns, with immigration a metaphor for the genuine fear of international competition? Perhaps we are witnessing a new political coalition of those ‘left behind’ by social change, bound together by a suspicion of everything cosmopolitan. Or is One Nation simply a vehicle for those pissed off at a stagnant political order, hoping to unseat and humiliate its representatives? What really motivates the mythical One Nation voter?' (Introduction)

Ups and Downs of Persistent Pauline Ross Fitzgerald , 2017 single work review essay
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 16 September 2017; (p. 21)

'Anna Broinowski’s revealing documentary Pauline Hanson: Please Explain! ran on SBS television a year ago. Throughout 2015 the award-winning filmmaker had unfettered access to Hanson and her Fed Up campaign, as Hanson attempted to win a Queensland Senate seat at the 2016 federal election.' (Introduction)

Last amended 3 Sep 2018 13:59:34
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