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y separately published work icon The Town single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 2017... 2017 The Town
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Community radio host Ciara receives dozens of unmarked cassette recordings every week and broadcasts them to a listenership of none. Ex-musician Tom drives an impractical bus that no one ever boards. Publican Jenny runs a hotel that has no patrons. Rick wanders the aisles of the Woolworths every day in an attempt to blunt the disappointment of adulthood.

'In a town of innumerable petrol stations, labyrinthine cul-de-sac streets, two competing shopping plazas, and ubiquitous drive-thru franchises, where are the townsfolk likely to find the truth about their collective past – and can they do so before the town disappears?

'Shaun Prescott’s debut novel The Town follows an unnamed narrator’s efforts to complete a book about disappeared towns in the Central West of New South Wales. Set in a yet-to-disappear town in the region—a town believed by its inhabitants to have no history at all—the novel traces its characters’ attempts to carve their own identities in a place that is both unyielding and teetering on the edge of oblivion.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • c
      Australia,
      c
      :
      Brow Books ,
      2017 .
      image of person or book cover 3310405831854383208.jpg
      This image has been sourced from Booktopia
      Extent: 238p.
      Note/s:
      • Published August 2017.

      ISBN: 9780994606822

Works about this Work

Perfecting a Metaphor Mandy Sayer , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend , 10 February 2018; (p. 18)

— Review of The Town Shaun Prescott , 2017 single work novel

'Shaun Prescott worries he will wake up and discover the success of his debut novel, The Town , is just an existential dream, he tells Mandy Sayer

'When I finished reading Shaun Prescott’s debut novel The Town I was naturally curious about the author, whose book jacket biography is unusually brief: he lives in the Blue Mountains and has had a few short pieces previously published in literary magazines.' (Introduction)

An Embassy for Nowhere Jennifer Mills , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , November 2017;

'There are three modes in which most stories about Australia’s regional towns can be categorised: horror (‘New to the ‘Yabba?’); affectionate satire (‘Goodbye, Porpoise Spit!’); and that particular nostalgia we cultivate for small-town life, a Wintonesque keening for place and belonging for which there seems to be no cure.' (Introduction)

Picture a Collective Disappearing Act Ed Wright , 2017 single work review essay
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 16 September 2017; (p. 23)

'Riffing off authors such as Gerald Murnane, Shaun Prescott builds an idiosyncratic vision that is simultaneously banal and powerfully moving. The Town is the debut novel of this short fiction writer from the NSW Blue Mountains. The narrator comes to an unnamed NSW country town to work part-time while writing a book on the disappearing towns of central-western NSW. He finds share accommodation with Rob in a townhouse and a job stacking shelves at the local Woolworths.' (Introduction)

'A Missing Fraction' : Loneliness and Disenchantment Shannon Burns , 2017 single work review essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 394 2017; (p. 36-37)

'Shaun Prescott’s début novel shares obvious conceptual territory with the fiction of Franz Kafka and Gerald Murnane, both of whom are mentioned in its promotional material. As with The Castle (1926) and The Plains (1982), The Town recounts the dreamlike experiences and observations of an enigmatic narrator–protagonist after he arrives in an unnamed town. But unlike Kafka’s surveyor or Murnane’s filmmaker, Prescott’s narrator is a writer who claims to be researching ‘a book about the disappearing towns in the Central West region of New South Wales’. These towns ‘had not deteriorated economically, its residents had not flocked to the closest regional towns in search of work, the buildings had not been dismantled’. Instead, they had ‘simply disappeared’. When this project fails, he decides to write a history of the town he now lives in, in the hope of uncovering its ‘essence’.' (Introduction)

Shaun Prescott The Town ZC , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 12-18 August 2017;

'The Town is Shaun Prescott’s full-length fiction debut and the sophomore novel from The Lifted Brow – the avant-garde Australian literary mag that, since moving into trade publishing last year, has championed writers whose ideas and execution run against the grain of commercial literary trends. Take this book: a deep dive into weirdness that reads like a blend of Donald Horne and García Márquez – although it contains little of the magic realist’s joie de vivre. Call it magical fatalism.' (Introduction)

Perfecting a Metaphor Mandy Sayer , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend , 10 February 2018; (p. 18)

— Review of The Town Shaun Prescott , 2017 single work novel

'Shaun Prescott worries he will wake up and discover the success of his debut novel, The Town , is just an existential dream, he tells Mandy Sayer

'When I finished reading Shaun Prescott’s debut novel The Town I was naturally curious about the author, whose book jacket biography is unusually brief: he lives in the Blue Mountains and has had a few short pieces previously published in literary magazines.' (Introduction)

Shaun Prescott The Town ZC , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 12-18 August 2017;

'The Town is Shaun Prescott’s full-length fiction debut and the sophomore novel from The Lifted Brow – the avant-garde Australian literary mag that, since moving into trade publishing last year, has championed writers whose ideas and execution run against the grain of commercial literary trends. Take this book: a deep dive into weirdness that reads like a blend of Donald Horne and García Márquez – although it contains little of the magic realist’s joie de vivre. Call it magical fatalism.' (Introduction)

'A Missing Fraction' : Loneliness and Disenchantment Shannon Burns , 2017 single work review essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 394 2017; (p. 36-37)

'Shaun Prescott’s début novel shares obvious conceptual territory with the fiction of Franz Kafka and Gerald Murnane, both of whom are mentioned in its promotional material. As with The Castle (1926) and The Plains (1982), The Town recounts the dreamlike experiences and observations of an enigmatic narrator–protagonist after he arrives in an unnamed town. But unlike Kafka’s surveyor or Murnane’s filmmaker, Prescott’s narrator is a writer who claims to be researching ‘a book about the disappearing towns in the Central West region of New South Wales’. These towns ‘had not deteriorated economically, its residents had not flocked to the closest regional towns in search of work, the buildings had not been dismantled’. Instead, they had ‘simply disappeared’. When this project fails, he decides to write a history of the town he now lives in, in the hope of uncovering its ‘essence’.' (Introduction)

Picture a Collective Disappearing Act Ed Wright , 2017 single work review essay
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 16 September 2017; (p. 23)

'Riffing off authors such as Gerald Murnane, Shaun Prescott builds an idiosyncratic vision that is simultaneously banal and powerfully moving. The Town is the debut novel of this short fiction writer from the NSW Blue Mountains. The narrator comes to an unnamed NSW country town to work part-time while writing a book on the disappearing towns of central-western NSW. He finds share accommodation with Rob in a townhouse and a job stacking shelves at the local Woolworths.' (Introduction)

An Embassy for Nowhere Jennifer Mills , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Sydney Review of Books , November 2017;

'There are three modes in which most stories about Australia’s regional towns can be categorised: horror (‘New to the ‘Yabba?’); affectionate satire (‘Goodbye, Porpoise Spit!’); and that particular nostalgia we cultivate for small-town life, a Wintonesque keening for place and belonging for which there seems to be no cure.' (Introduction)

Last amended 27 Mar 2018 13:12:41
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