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Issue Details: First known date: 2017... 2017 Against Native Title : Conflict and Creativity in Outback Australia
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Against Native Title is about one group's lived experience of a divisive native title claim in the outback town of Ceduna, where the native title claims process has thoroughly reorganised local Aboriginal identities over the course of the past decade.

'The central character in this story is senior Aboriginal woman Sue Haseldine, a self-styled charismatic rebel and master storyteller. Sue's extended family has experienced native title as an unwelcome imposition: something that has emanated from the state and out of which they gained only enemies. They rail against the logic of native title and oppose the extensive mineral exploration underway in their country.

'But this is not simply a tale of conflict. Threaded throughout is the story of a twice-yearly event called 'rockhole recovery'; trips that involve numerous days of four-wheel drive travel to a series of permanent water sources and Dreaming sites. Against Native Title captures the energy that fuels this unique, small-scale initiative. Rockhole recovery expresses the ways in which Sue Haseldine and her family continue to care for, and maintain connections to, Country - outside of the native title process.

'Against Native Title pursues a controversial and much neglected line of enquiry: the native title process is not necessarily a force for good. This is a vivacious and very human story, which makes a vital contribution to national debates around issues of Aboriginal futures in remote and regional areas. ' (Publication summary)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Eve Vincent ‘Against Native Title’ : Conflict and Creativity in Outback Australia Heidi Norman , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 1 2018; (p. 74-76)

— Review of Against Native Title : Conflict and Creativity in Outback Australia Eve Vincent , 2017 single work biography

''Against native title’ is an ethnography of one community’s rejection and partial re-engagement with the legal determination of native title over their country.' (Introduction)

The Paradox of Recognition : The Cultural Politics of Claiming Native Title Richard J. Martin , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May no. 401 2018; (p. 18-19)

'The year 2017 marked the twenty- fifth anniversary of the High Court’s 1992 decision in Mabo v Queensland (No 2) (Mabo), which recognised the existence of Indigenous people’s traditional ‘native title’ rights over the Murray Islands in the Torres Strait. This finding, and the passage through parliament of the Keating government’s Native Title Act the following year, dramatically changed the legal position of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australian society. Since then, there have been 338 determinations that native title exists in different parts of Australia, delivering significant benefits to a substantial proportion of claimant groups.' (Introduction)

Eve Vincent ‘Against Native Title’ : Conflict and Creativity in Outback Australia Heidi Norman , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 1 2018; (p. 74-76)

— Review of Against Native Title : Conflict and Creativity in Outback Australia Eve Vincent , 2017 single work biography

''Against native title’ is an ethnography of one community’s rejection and partial re-engagement with the legal determination of native title over their country.' (Introduction)

The Paradox of Recognition : The Cultural Politics of Claiming Native Title Richard J. Martin , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May no. 401 2018; (p. 18-19)

'The year 2017 marked the twenty- fifth anniversary of the High Court’s 1992 decision in Mabo v Queensland (No 2) (Mabo), which recognised the existence of Indigenous people’s traditional ‘native title’ rights over the Murray Islands in the Torres Strait. This finding, and the passage through parliament of the Keating government’s Native Title Act the following year, dramatically changed the legal position of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australian society. Since then, there have been 338 determinations that native title exists in different parts of Australia, delivering significant benefits to a substantial proportion of claimant groups.' (Introduction)

Last amended 8 Jun 2017 06:03:23
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