AustLit logo
I, Migrant? sequence   poetry  
Issue Details: First known date: 2013... 2013 I, Migrant?
The material on this page is available to AustLit subscribers. If you are a subscriber or are from a subscribing organisation, please log in to gain full access. To explore options for subscribing to this unique teaching, research, and publishing resource for Australian culture and storytelling, please contact us or find out more.

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'‘I, Migrant?’ is a narrative poetry sequence that explores themes of language, culture, identity and belonging through the eyes of an Australian living in Den Haag, The Netherlands. The speaker in the poems faces challenges such as seeking work and making friends in a context where she does not speak the dominant language, Dutch. This proves far from easy, destabilising her sense of identity. She questions where and how she can belong. Reluctant to join what she considers “the white ghetto of Den Haag,” the speaker initially attempts to assimilate herself into Dutch culture, but later finds solace in a community of other expats. Within this community, national identities become exaggerated and people morph into stereotypes. The speaker increasingly defines herself as “Australian,” performing this identity both publicly and in private. Beneath the surface there bubbles, however, an awareness that she is acting out a myth. A more genuine sense of belonging emerges, unexpectedly, in an Asian food court, where she converses in Dutch with staff who also speak it as their second language. The speaker concludes that identity is located in language. It is therefore neither fixed nor singular, but multiple and forever changing.'

Source: Abstract.

Includes

Vreemdelingen (Strangers) / We Are Them i "Who are we?", Amelia Walker , 2013 single work poetry
— Appears in: Portal , vol. 10 no. 1 2013;
Hello! Pleased Your Meeting to Make! i "I am three weeks in this country.", Amelia Walker , 2013 single work poetry
— Appears in: Portal , vol. 10 no. 1 2013;
Out of the Sky i "You fall out of the sky and into the twilight", Amelia Walker , 2013 single work poetry
— Appears in: Portal , vol. 10 no. 1 2013;
Woorden en Worden (Words and Becoming) i "The Dutch word horen means both 'to hear'", Amelia Walker , 2013 single work poetry
— Appears in: Portal , vol. 10 no. 1 2013;
Denial i "I am not going to become one of those 'Engelse mensen'", Amelia Walker , 2013 single work poetry
— Appears in: Portal , vol. 10 no. 1 2013;
Okay i "Okay. So I'm paler than a dead albino axolotl under ten feet of snow.", Amelia Walker , 2013 single work poetry
— Appears in: Portal , vol. 10 no. 1 2013;
The Guy Slash Woman Slash Couple i "I am constantly hearing stories", Amelia Walker , 2013 single work poetry
— Appears in: Portal , vol. 10 no. 1 2013;
Salvation Now Comes in a Tube i "Nobody liked it, the first time", Amelia Walker , 2013 single work poetry
— Appears in: Portal , vol. 10 no. 1 2013;
It Figures i "I never topped my class in maths.", Amelia Walker , 2013 single work poetry
— Appears in: Portal , vol. 10 no. 1 2013;
Coda i "Late morning, Den Haag.", Amelia Walker , 2013 single work poetry
— Appears in: Portal , vol. 10 no. 1 2013;

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Portal Australians Abroad vol. 10 no. 1 Juliana De Nooy (editor), 2013 11172608 2013 periodical issue

    'Although commonly characterized as an immigrant nation, Australia has been shaped just as importantly by the overseas journeys of its people, and the liminal experiences thus provided have not only been self-defining and defining of the other, but at times nation-defining. This special issue proposes a multidisciplinary analysis of Australian travellers and expatriates past and present: the reasons for and destinations of their travel, its impact on their identity, the roles they play, their writings and reflections, their linguistic and intercultural competence.

    'Clusters of travellers to particular destinations give rise to narrative patterns which solidify into templates, the narrative equivalent of the beaten track. The essays that follow highlight both discursive grooves and off-piste accounts that challenge the patterns. In both cases, the emphasis in the essays is on the travellers’ active engagement in the experience and on their negotiation of existing discourses. For even those who follow the trail invest it with personal meanings.'

    Source: Introduction.

    2013
Last amended 11 May 2017 09:57:12
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X