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y separately published work icon The Herring Lass selected work   poetry  
Issue Details: First known date: 2016... 2016 The Herring Lass
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The Herring Lass explores human and animal migrations: how animals and birds survive extreme climate and resist assailants can provide reflections on our global engagements, the exodus of refugees. These poems consider the threshold between wilderness, history and social order where landscape becomes a place of violence, dispossession and loss. A woman's experience of fragmentation, exile, divorce, motherhood, is an undercurrent, her words wrestling with the consequences of these events.' (Publication summary)

Notes

  • Nominated for Australian Book Review‘s Best Books 2016

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Todmorden, Calderdale, West Yorkshire,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Arc Publications ,
      2016 .
      image of person or book cover 144113653370624944.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 78p.
      Note/s:
      • Published October 2016
      ISBN: 9781910345764

Works about this Work

Outward-looking Poetry : Michelle Cahill’s The Herring Lass Geoff Page , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , October vol. 21 no. 2 2017;

'It is instructive to compare Michelle Cahill’s third collection, The Herring Lass, with her rather different second one, Vishvarupa. The latter was primarily concerned with Hindu religion and mythology, written from an ‘outsider’s’, if slightly privileged, angle. Cahill (with Indian ancestry) was born in Kenya, grew up in England and moved to Sydney in her teens.'  (Introduction)

Review Short: Michelle Cahill’s The Herring Lass Nathanael O'Reilly , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 1 August vol. 82 no. 2017;

'Michelle Cahill is well-known to contemporary Australian readers as a poet, editor and fiction writer. She is the winner of the 2017 UTS Glenda Adams Award for New Writing (one of the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards), the Val Vallis Award, and the Hilary Mantel International Short Story Prize, and has been shortlisted for other major prizes. The Herring Lass is Cahill’s fourth collection of poetry, and her first with a UK-based publisher. The transition from an Australian publisher (Cahill’s third, Vishvarupa, was published by Five Islands Press) to a British publisher (Arc) should bring Cahill’s work to greater prominence within the global Anglophone reading community. The front cover of The Herring Lass reproduces Winslow Homer’s The Fisher Girl (1894), introducing the themes of female strength, endurance and watchfulness, and creating unity with the collection’s title and title-poem. The back cover features praise quotes from Sarah Holland-Batt and John Kinsella, emphasising Cahill’s status as one of Australia’s leading poets. Indeed, Cahill is widely published and anthologised.' (introduction)

Lyricism, Imagination and Vigour : Michelle Cahill’s The Herring Lass Ben Hession , 2017 single work review
— Appears in: Verity La , July 2017;

— Review of The Herring Lass Michelle Cahill , 2016 selected work poetry
Mary Cresswell Reviews The Herring Lass by Michelle Cahill Mary Cresswell , 2017 single work review
— Appears in: Plumwood Mountain : An Australian Journal of Ecopoetry and Ecopoetics , June vol. 4 no. 1.1 2017;

— Review of The Herring Lass Michelle Cahill , 2016 selected work poetry
'Snake Like Charms' by Amanda Joy and 'The Herring Lass' by Michelle Cahill Rose Lucas , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June-July no. 392 2017;
'Michelle Cahill and Amanda Joy have produced two engaging and proficient collections of poetry. In their different ways, each revels in worlds of perception, imagination, and poetic craft.' (Introduction)
Nadia Niaz Reviews The Herring Lass by Michelle Cahill Nadia Niaz , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Mascara Literary Review , April no. 20 2017;

— Review of The Herring Lass Michelle Cahill , 2016 selected work poetry
'In a 2011 interview with the Goethe Institut Australia, Michelle Cahill spoke of how her work explores an ‘imaginary habitation in many places’. The Herring Lass is the latest phase of this exploration, demonstrating Cahill’s ability to move and connect repeatedly across massive distances.' (Introduction)
Mary Cresswell Reviews The Herring Lass by Michelle Cahill Mary Cresswell , 2017 single work review
— Appears in: Plumwood Mountain : An Australian Journal of Ecopoetry and Ecopoetics , June vol. 4 no. 1.1 2017;

— Review of The Herring Lass Michelle Cahill , 2016 selected work poetry
Lyricism, Imagination and Vigour : Michelle Cahill’s The Herring Lass Ben Hession , 2017 single work review
— Appears in: Verity La , July 2017;

— Review of The Herring Lass Michelle Cahill , 2016 selected work poetry
'Snake Like Charms' by Amanda Joy and 'The Herring Lass' by Michelle Cahill Rose Lucas , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June-July no. 392 2017;
'Michelle Cahill and Amanda Joy have produced two engaging and proficient collections of poetry. In their different ways, each revels in worlds of perception, imagination, and poetic craft.' (Introduction)
Alert to Erasure, Exclusion, and Appropriation : Tina Giannoukos Launches ‘The Herring Lass’ by Michelle Cahill Tina Giannoukos , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Rochford Street Review , January – March no. 21 2017;
'It’s a great honour to launch Michelle Cahill’s new poetry collection, The Herring Lass. Firstly, I’d like to thank Michelle for this honour. Secondly, launching this collection gives me the opportunity to speak of Michelle’s superb craftsmanship. With the publication of this collection, Michelle affirms her position as a consummate poet of extraordinary range and skill. She’s not only an acclaimed poet. She’s also an acclaimed fiction writer, essayist, and editor of the online Mascara Literary Review. (Introduction)
Review Short: Michelle Cahill’s The Herring Lass Nathanael O'Reilly , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 1 August vol. 82 no. 2017;

'Michelle Cahill is well-known to contemporary Australian readers as a poet, editor and fiction writer. She is the winner of the 2017 UTS Glenda Adams Award for New Writing (one of the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards), the Val Vallis Award, and the Hilary Mantel International Short Story Prize, and has been shortlisted for other major prizes. The Herring Lass is Cahill’s fourth collection of poetry, and her first with a UK-based publisher. The transition from an Australian publisher (Cahill’s third, Vishvarupa, was published by Five Islands Press) to a British publisher (Arc) should bring Cahill’s work to greater prominence within the global Anglophone reading community. The front cover of The Herring Lass reproduces Winslow Homer’s The Fisher Girl (1894), introducing the themes of female strength, endurance and watchfulness, and creating unity with the collection’s title and title-poem. The back cover features praise quotes from Sarah Holland-Batt and John Kinsella, emphasising Cahill’s status as one of Australia’s leading poets. Indeed, Cahill is widely published and anthologised.' (introduction)

Outward-looking Poetry : Michelle Cahill’s The Herring Lass Geoff Page , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , October vol. 21 no. 2 2017;

'It is instructive to compare Michelle Cahill’s third collection, The Herring Lass, with her rather different second one, Vishvarupa. The latter was primarily concerned with Hindu religion and mythology, written from an ‘outsider’s’, if slightly privileged, angle. Cahill (with Indian ancestry) was born in Kenya, grew up in England and moved to Sydney in her teens.'  (Introduction)

Last amended 21 Apr 2017 09:07:35
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