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[v] assertion Language Immersion Program single work   poetry   "I threw out a wok scabbed"
Issue Details: First known date: 2017... 2017 Language Immersion Program
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y separately published work icon Foam:e no. 14 March 2017 10829127 2017 periodical issue

    'Welcome to the fourteenth edition of foam:e. Another bumper issue, packed with poems, reviews, an interview and a postcard.

    'There are poems, that the editors responded to very strongly, David Greenslade's poems so detailed, immediately likeable and weirdly domestic; Jill Jones’s poems with their ease and intellectual range. But a number of early career poets work really stood out and demanded inclusion so please check out Amanda Anastasi and Sumudu Samarawickrama’s poems.'  (Angela Gardner, Carmen Leigh Keates, Editorial introduction)

    2017

Works about this Work

A Mirror in the Dark Ella Jeffery , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , vol. 62 no. 2 2017; (p. 9-20)

'People always used to tell me 'Shanghai's not real China'. I heard it from locals, from expats like myself, from visitors who had spent a week or two In Xi'an or Chongqing or Lijiang and thought they should advise me That I  wasn't getting the real deal. What they wanted me to knew was that Shanghai, a hub of foreign trade and business, with some of its central districts full of stores like Nike and H&M, was not enough. It was too much like home and not enough like what a foreigner should experience in China.'(Introduction)
 

A Mirror in the Dark Ella Jeffery , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , vol. 62 no. 2 2017; (p. 9-20)

'People always used to tell me 'Shanghai's not real China'. I heard it from locals, from expats like myself, from visitors who had spent a week or two In Xi'an or Chongqing or Lijiang and thought they should advise me That I  wasn't getting the real deal. What they wanted me to knew was that Shanghai, a hub of foreign trade and business, with some of its central districts full of stores like Nike and H&M, was not enough. It was too much like home and not enough like what a foreigner should experience in China.'(Introduction)
 

Last amended 28 Mar 2017 15:10:34
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