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y separately published work icon Redactor selected work   poetry  
Issue Details: First known date: 2017... 2017 Redactor
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'redactor uses found texts from the everyday – emails, memos, notes, lyrics, text messages, tweets, webfeeds – as poetic material. Drawing on techniques from the visual arts and radical writing such as the ready-made, the cut-up and the concrete poem, Eddie Paterson reflects upon the ways in which the historical legacy of censorship intersects with contemporary surveillance technologies.' (Publication summary)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • North Melbourne, Flemington - North Melbourne area, Melbourne - North, Melbourne, Victoria,: Whitmore Press , 2017 .
      image of person or book cover 5380147764305867874.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 118p.
      Note/s:
      • Launched by Amy Brown 1 February, 2017
      ISBN: 9780987386687

Works about this Work

The Avant Garde in ‘Australia’ : After Eddie Paterson, Philip Mead and Caitlin Maling Robert Wood , 2018 single work essay
— Appears in: Journal of Poetics Research , March no. 8 2018;

'A.J. Carruthers has been admirably busy — academic monograph, blog posts for Southerly, a new index of experimental poets on Jacket2, job in Shanghai, daily Tweets. And there is a lot in his project of promoting ‘the Australian avant-garde’ to be sympathetic towards, particularly as a project after his Stave Sightings. But can we make a distinction between his formulation of ‘the Australian avant-garde’ (or its variations such as ‘neo’ and ‘experimental’) and ‘the avant-garde in ‘Australia’’? And how might that matter for suburbanism?'  (Introduction)

Review Short: Eddie Paterson’s Redactor Dominic Symes , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 1 February no. 84 2018;

— Review of Redactor Eddie Paterson , 2017 selected work poetry

'As a physical object with an online extraction, Eddie Paterson’s new book of poems, redactor, presents the performance of mark-making in an ever expanding digital sphere. The juxtaposition between the white of the page and the black of the ink has long provided a site for textual collision, one that was used to great effect by the concrete poets and the French Symbolists. Out of the deep web’s detritus, Paterson’s collection discovers new poetic spaces of beauty in the banality of our metadata.'  (Introduction)

[Review Essay] Redactor Alison Clifton , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: StylusLit , September no. 2 2017;

'Eddie Paterson’s Redactor, a collection of poet-censored poems, compels the reader to creatively interact with the text in search of meanings. With its blacked-out words (mostly names but also other identifiers), the poetry forms an act of resistance against contemporary consumer capitalism. Witty, memorable, and offbeat, Paterson’s poetry makes the banal seem beautiful and the mundane magnificent even as our physical and virtual existences are subject to ever-increasing surveillance. ' (Introduction)

Give or Take a Cluster of Well-placed Words Ali Smith , 2017 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 14 October 2017; (p. 20)

'Sometimes poetry is made of words thought up and strung together. Sometimes it’s made of words found and rearranged: words from other poems, from signage or advertising, from overheard conversation, from novels, magazine articles, from Twitter, from the newspaper. Every kind of literary art and verbal detritus can be reused by poets.' (Introduction)

Fragmentation Joan Fleming , 2017 single work review essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 394 2017; (p. 58)

Two recent collections by two very different voices have both been ‘blurbed’ as works of fragmentation. In her début collection, Cassie Lewis is described as speaking for ‘a generation whose ambitions and emotions have become very fractured and fragmented’. Eddie Paterson’s new book is full of redacted texts of digital trash and treasure; it is a blacked-out, cut-up collage of the textual chatter of our ‘post-digital existence’. The lyric voice of The Blue Decodes, however, is less fracture and fragment, and more a compelling portrait of an alert mind in tension with itself. redactor is composed of censored, dismembered, remembered emails, memos, text messages, and webfeeds. While this might qualify as ‘uncreative writing’, in that its conceit is seemingly the inverse of the personal lyric, it, too, is a portrait of the artist reading, absorbing, repelling, mocking, and finding delight in a weird, flat, bewildering multiverse of screens where poems are being written all the time. (Introduction)

Review Short: Eddie Paterson’s Redactor Dominic Symes , 2018 single work review
— Appears in: Cordite Poetry Review , 1 February no. 84 2018;

— Review of Redactor Eddie Paterson , 2017 selected work poetry

'As a physical object with an online extraction, Eddie Paterson’s new book of poems, redactor, presents the performance of mark-making in an ever expanding digital sphere. The juxtaposition between the white of the page and the black of the ink has long provided a site for textual collision, one that was used to great effect by the concrete poets and the French Symbolists. Out of the deep web’s detritus, Paterson’s collection discovers new poetic spaces of beauty in the banality of our metadata.'  (Introduction)

This Is the Book for You : Amy Brown Launches ‘Redactor’ by Eddie Paterson Amy Brown , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: Rochford Street Review , January – March no. 21 2017;
‘This is the book for you’ is the title of a satirical, distilled review, which begins ‘joan collins is an extraordinary orchid of evil & beauty’; it also happens to be true of redactor – whatever “true” means these days. This is the book for you, because of its acute timeliness. With wit and sagacity, Eddie Paterson’s latest collection of poems seems to herald and ward against several recent dystopian events. ' (Introduction)
Saying / Not Saying Rose Lucas , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: TEXT : Journal of Writing and Writing Courses , April vol. 21 no. 1 2017;
'Eddie Paterson’s debut collection of poetry, redactor, plays with ideas of what can be said, what isn’t said and what it might be possible to interpret across a variety of modes. While we might think of ‘redaction’ as being primarily concerned with forms of censorship, these poems push and niggle a reader to think laterally about the multiple ways in which the idea of the ‘the blank’ or being blanked out might operate: in terms of self-censorship, as a way of making a particular more generalisable, even as a method for drawing attention to that which might appear to be self-deprecating, cloaked in discretion. The collection after all is titled redactor; these textual clusters are not merely – or not simply – passive victims of a censor’s knife, but in fact are also potentially actors using the technique of redaction as others might use the dash or the white space on a page. Redactor is about the things that are said on the surface, with directness and verve and engagement. It is also about the nuance under the word, the often punning or uncomfortable space levered open by irony or the graphic. (Introduction)
Fragmentation Joan Fleming , 2017 single work review essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 394 2017; (p. 58)

Two recent collections by two very different voices have both been ‘blurbed’ as works of fragmentation. In her début collection, Cassie Lewis is described as speaking for ‘a generation whose ambitions and emotions have become very fractured and fragmented’. Eddie Paterson’s new book is full of redacted texts of digital trash and treasure; it is a blacked-out, cut-up collage of the textual chatter of our ‘post-digital existence’. The lyric voice of The Blue Decodes, however, is less fracture and fragment, and more a compelling portrait of an alert mind in tension with itself. redactor is composed of censored, dismembered, remembered emails, memos, text messages, and webfeeds. While this might qualify as ‘uncreative writing’, in that its conceit is seemingly the inverse of the personal lyric, it, too, is a portrait of the artist reading, absorbing, repelling, mocking, and finding delight in a weird, flat, bewildering multiverse of screens where poems are being written all the time. (Introduction)

Give or Take a Cluster of Well-placed Words Ali Smith , 2017 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 14 October 2017; (p. 20)

'Sometimes poetry is made of words thought up and strung together. Sometimes it’s made of words found and rearranged: words from other poems, from signage or advertising, from overheard conversation, from novels, magazine articles, from Twitter, from the newspaper. Every kind of literary art and verbal detritus can be reused by poets.' (Introduction)

[Review Essay] Redactor Alison Clifton , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: StylusLit , September no. 2 2017;

'Eddie Paterson’s Redactor, a collection of poet-censored poems, compels the reader to creatively interact with the text in search of meanings. With its blacked-out words (mostly names but also other identifiers), the poetry forms an act of resistance against contemporary consumer capitalism. Witty, memorable, and offbeat, Paterson’s poetry makes the banal seem beautiful and the mundane magnificent even as our physical and virtual existences are subject to ever-increasing surveillance. ' (Introduction)

Last amended 15 Jan 2018 16:14:10
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