y Scoundrel Days single work   autobiography  
Issue Details: First known date: 2017... 2017 Scoundrel Days
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Works about this Work

Brentley Frazer, Scoundrel Days JD , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 11 March 2017;
'The shame is that Frazer’s childhood in The Truth is so teasingly dismissed, as he chooses instead to chronicle the most boring decade of a young literary hoon’s life, aping, for the umpteenth time, the tired old conventions of a movement whose toxic influence still lingers.' (Introduction)
'Scoundrel Days : A Memoir' by Brentley Frazer Duncan Fardon , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , March no. 389 2017; (p. 36)
‘rentley Frazer, one of many scoundrels in his memoir Scoundrel Days, documents coming of age on the boundary of civilisation. His father’s vocation as the only policeman in a small northern Queensland mining town subjects Frazer to a chaotic side of life: a lockup only a stone’s throw from his bedroom; housing criminals and murderous poachers; bloodied victims of domestic violence showing up in the early hours; and the aftermath of car crashes. His parents’ involvement with the new-age cult ‘The Family’ introduces perverts into the home. But Frazer embraces his circumstances with a kind of brash vigour, starting The Wreckers gang, drinking, smoking, taking drugs, and committing acts of vandalism.’ (Introduction)
Brentley Frazer : Scoundrel Days : A Memoir Annette Hughes , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: The Newtown Review of Books , March 2017;
'Brentley Frazer has changed names in this memoir to protect the privacy of particular individuals, but every word of it rings true. Children who grew up in far north Queensland will feel Frazer’s descriptions of the place on their skin. Teens who railed against the stultifying suburban hell of late 1970s Brisbane and came of age in share houses, surviving on shit jobs and the dole, will recall the taste of amphetamine and cheap booze and the smell of mouldy sheets on a stained mattress. The story at first glance resembles classic grunge, but proves much more interesting than that narrow pigeonhole suggests.' (Introduction)
Brentley Frazer : Scoundrel Days : A Memoir Annette Hughes , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: The Newtown Review of Books , March 2017;
'Brentley Frazer has changed names in this memoir to protect the privacy of particular individuals, but every word of it rings true. Children who grew up in far north Queensland will feel Frazer’s descriptions of the place on their skin. Teens who railed against the stultifying suburban hell of late 1970s Brisbane and came of age in share houses, surviving on shit jobs and the dole, will recall the taste of amphetamine and cheap booze and the smell of mouldy sheets on a stained mattress. The story at first glance resembles classic grunge, but proves much more interesting than that narrow pigeonhole suggests.' (Introduction)
'Scoundrel Days : A Memoir' by Brentley Frazer Duncan Fardon , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , March no. 389 2017; (p. 36)
‘rentley Frazer, one of many scoundrels in his memoir Scoundrel Days, documents coming of age on the boundary of civilisation. His father’s vocation as the only policeman in a small northern Queensland mining town subjects Frazer to a chaotic side of life: a lockup only a stone’s throw from his bedroom; housing criminals and murderous poachers; bloodied victims of domestic violence showing up in the early hours; and the aftermath of car crashes. His parents’ involvement with the new-age cult ‘The Family’ introduces perverts into the home. But Frazer embraces his circumstances with a kind of brash vigour, starting The Wreckers gang, drinking, smoking, taking drugs, and committing acts of vandalism.’ (Introduction)
Brentley Frazer, Scoundrel Days JD , 2017 single work essay
— Appears in: The Saturday Paper , 11 March 2017;
'The shame is that Frazer’s childhood in The Truth is so teasingly dismissed, as he chooses instead to chronicle the most boring decade of a young literary hoon’s life, aping, for the umpteenth time, the tired old conventions of a movement whose toxic influence still lingers.' (Introduction)
Last amended 27 Sep 2016 10:52:02
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