form y First Australians single work   film/TV  
Issue Details: First known date: 2007 2007
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'First Australians chronicles the birth of contemporary Australia as never told before, from the perspective of its first people. First Australians explores what unfolds when the oldest living culture in the world is overrun by the world's greatest empire.

'Over seven episodes, First Australians depicts the true stories of individuals - both black and white - caught in an epic drama of friendship, revenge, loss and victory in Australia's most transformative period of history.

'The story begins in 1788 in Sydney, with the friendship between an Englishmen (Governor Phillip) and a warrior (Bennelong) and ends in 1993 with Koiki Mabo's legal challenge to the foundation of Australia. First Australians chronicles the collision of two worlds and the genesis of a new nation.' Source: www.sbs.com.au (Sighted 27/09/2008).

Notes

  • First commissioned by former SBS director, Nigel Milan in 2002.
  • Begins Sunday 12 October 2008 on SBS television.
  • First Australians – Episode 1, They Have Come to Stay

    Covers the first meetings between the Indigenous Aborigines, the first Australians, and the British First Fleet, who sailed into Sydney on 26 January 1788. They soon come face to face and while their differences are immense, apprehension quickly ...

    First Australians – Episode 2, Her Will to Survive

    This episode covers the period from 1825–60 and explores the history of European settlement in Tasmania through the stories of Truganini and George Augustus Robinson. Colonisation spreads south to Tasmania, along with the settlers’ desire for land occupied by the ...

    First Australians – Episode 3, Freedom For Our Lifetime

    The third episode of the First Australians series begins in 1860 in Victoria and, through the lives of Simon Wonga and William Barak, explores broader issues facing Aboriginal people in these times. The threat of extinction hovers over the first ...

    First Australians – Episode 4, No Other Law

    Episode four, 'No other law’, explores the history of white settlement in Central Australia and the stories of homicidal police officer Constable Willshire, who brings mayhem to the Arrernte nation. Authorities turn a blind eye before telegraph operator Frank Gillen ...

    First Australians – Episode 5, Unhealthy Government Experiment

    In this fifth episode of First Australians, European settlement spreads to Western Australia and is met with much conflict, as explored through the experiences of Aboriginal stockman Jandamarra. The history and aftermath of the Stolen Generations is examined in the ...

    First Australians – Episode 6, A Fair Deal for a Dark Race

    Episode six, 'A Fair Deal for a Dark Race’, explores Indigenous history from 1930–67, primarily in the south-eastern regions of Australia, through the lives of Yorta Yorta men Doug Nicholls and his uncle, William Cooper. Across the continent, the first ...

    First Australians – Episode 7, We Are No Longer Shadows

    The seventh and final episode of First Australians covers the period 1967–93, focusing on the Torres Strait Islands and Eddie ‘Koiki’ Mabo’s fight for land rights. This period was, globally, a time of increased civil rights advocacy and political activism, ...

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Stolen Generations' Testimonies Board of the Stolen Generations’ Testimonies Foundation , 2007 8960307 2007 website

    'The ‘Stolen Generations’ Testimonies’ project is an initiative to record on film the personal testimonies of Australia’s Stolen Generations Survivors and share them online.'

    'The Stolen Generations' Testimonies Foundation hopes the online museum will become a national treasure and a unique and sacred keeping place for Stolen Generations’ Survivors’ Testimonies. By allowing Australians to listen to the Survivors’ stories with open hearts and without judgement, the foundation hopes more people will be engaged in the healing process. ' (Source: Stolen Generations Testimonies website)

    2007
    Note:

    From First Australians – Episode 5, Unhealthy Government Experiment

    In this fifth episode of First Australians, European settlement spreads to Western Australia and is met with much conflict, as explored through the experiences of Aboriginal stockman Jandamarra. The history and aftermath of the Stolen Generations is examined in the ...

      2008 .
      Note/s:
      • Production supported by Film Australia and the Film Finance Corporation (FFC) with SBS Independent and the NSW Film and Television Office.

Works about this Work

Breaking Out of Cinema's Dark Cube Michael Bodey , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 9 February 2011; (p. 17)
The 2011 BigPond Adelaide Film Festival has supported Indigenous talent as part of this year's festival.
Ckear-Eyed Lens Gives Complex Stories Focus Michael Bodey , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 23 November 2011; (p. 15)
Reconciliation and the History Wars in Australian Cinema Felicity Collins , 2011-2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Exhuming Passions : The Pressure of the Past in Ireland and Australia 2012; (p. 207-222)
'When The Proposition ( a UK/Australia co-production, directed by John Hillcoat and scripted by Nick Cave) was released in 2005, film reviewers had no qualms about claiming this spectacular saga of colonial violence on the Queensland frontier as a 'history' film. A reviewer on BBC Radio 4 described The Proposition as 'a bushranger Western...set in violent 1880s Australian outback exposing the bitter racial tensions between English and Irish settlers. A Sunday Times review declared that 'Australia's brutal post-colonial history is stripped of all the lies in a bloody clash of cultures between the British police, the Irish bushrangers and the Aborigines.' Foregrounding the film's revisionist spectacle of colonial violence, an Australian reviewer predicted that, despite 'scenes of throat-cutting torture, rape and exploding heads...The Proposition could be the most accurate look at our national history yet'. (Author's introduction, 207)
Indigenous or Exotic? Trees in Australian Cinema Chris Mann , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Etropic : Electronic Journal of Studies in the Tropics , no. 10 2011; (p. 141-152)
'This article examines trees in three Australian films to assess if they are seen from a white point of view or an Indigenous point of view.' (Author's abstract)
Beyond Good/Should/Bad : Teaching Australian Indigenous Film and Television Therese Davis , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 24 no. 5 2010; (p. 799 - 804)
Q&A Rachel Perkins 2010-2011 single work interview
— Appears in: SL : State Library of New South Wales Magazine , Summer vol. 3 no. 4 2010-2011; (p. 41)
y Witnessing Australian Stories : History, Testimony and Memory in Contemporary Culture Kelly Jean Butler , Melbourne : 2010 6037495 2010 single work thesis

'This book is about how Australians have responded to stories about suffering and injustice in Australia, presented in a range of public media, including literature, history, films, and television. Those who have responded are both ordinary and prominent Australians–politicians, writers, and scholars. All have sought to come to terms with Australia's history by responding empathetically to stories of its marginalized citizens.

'Drawing upon international scholarship on collective memory, public history, testimony, and witnessing, this book represents a cultural history of contemporary Australia. It examines the forms of witnessing that dominated Australian public culture at the turn of the millennium. Since the late 1980s, witnessing has developed in Australia in response to the increasingly audible voices of indigenous peoples, migrants, and more recently, asylum seekers. As these voices became public, they posed a challenge not only to scholars and politicians, but also, most importantly, to ordinary citizens.

'When former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd delivered his historic apology to Australia's indigenous peoples in February 2008, he performed an act of collective witnessing that affirmed the testimony and experiences of Aboriginal Australians. The phenomenon of witnessing became crucial, not only to the recognition and reparation of past injustices, but to efforts to create a more cosmopolitan Australia in the present. This is a vital addition to Transactions critically acclaimed Memory and Narrative series.' (Publisher's blurb)

Four Days of Great Films 2009 single work column
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 20 May no. 451 2009; (p. 41)
Film is the New Black Michaela Boland , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australian Financial Review , 6-7 June 2009; (p. 28)
DVD Reviews Rosalie Higson , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 17-18 January 2009; (p. 21)

— Review of First Australians Rachel Perkins Louis Nowra Beck Cole 2007 single work film/TV
Compulsory Viewing Ellie Rennie , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Inside Story 2008-;

— Review of First Australians Rachel Perkins Louis Nowra Beck Cole 2007 single work film/TV
Our Rich History From a Black Perspective Amanda Meade , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 22 September 2008; (p. 35)
The Queen of Kinship Rachel Browne , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 5 October 2008; (p. 2-3)
SBS's View of Aboriginal History Worth the Long Wait Errol Simper , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 27 October 2008; (p. 40)
Phillip Adams Phillip Adams , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian Magazine , 22-23 November 2008; (p. 42)
Indifference Has Robbed Generations of Our History Louis Nowra , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 27-28 December 2008; (p. 23)
Untitled Melinda Houston , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 12 October 2008; (p. 38)

— Review of First Australians Rachel Perkins Louis Nowra Beck Cole 2007 single work film/TV
First Contact Graeme Blundell , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 11-12 October 2008; (p. 24-25)

— Review of First Australians Rachel Perkins Louis Nowra Beck Cole 2007 single work film/TV
From Phillip to Mabo Dianne Butler , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 11 - 12 October 2008 2008; (p. 20)

— Review of First Australians Rachel Perkins Louis Nowra Beck Cole 2007 single work film/TV
Examine Your Consciences Ruth Ritchie , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 18-19 October 2008; (p. 10)

— Review of First Australians Rachel Perkins Louis Nowra Beck Cole 2007 single work film/TV
Untitled Melinda Houston , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 12 October 2008; (p. 38)

— Review of First Australians Rachel Perkins Louis Nowra Beck Cole 2007 single work film/TV
First Contact Graeme Blundell , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 11-12 October 2008; (p. 24-25)

— Review of First Australians Rachel Perkins Louis Nowra Beck Cole 2007 single work film/TV
From Phillip to Mabo Dianne Butler , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 11 - 12 October 2008 2008; (p. 20)

— Review of First Australians Rachel Perkins Louis Nowra Beck Cole 2007 single work film/TV
Examine Your Consciences Ruth Ritchie , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 18-19 October 2008; (p. 10)

— Review of First Australians Rachel Perkins Louis Nowra Beck Cole 2007 single work film/TV
First Australians Series Launched Margaret Smith , 2008 single work review
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 8 October no. 436 2008; (p. 27)

— Review of First Australians Rachel Perkins Louis Nowra Beck Cole 2007 single work film/TV
DVD Reviews Rosalie Higson , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 17-18 January 2009; (p. 21)

— Review of First Australians Rachel Perkins Louis Nowra Beck Cole 2007 single work film/TV
Compulsory Viewing Ellie Rennie , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Inside Story 2008-;

— Review of First Australians Rachel Perkins Louis Nowra Beck Cole 2007 single work film/TV
Our Rich History From a Black Perspective Amanda Meade , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 22 September 2008; (p. 35)
The Queen of Kinship Rachel Browne , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 5 October 2008; (p. 2-3)
SBS's View of Aboriginal History Worth the Long Wait Errol Simper , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 27 October 2008; (p. 40)
Phillip Adams Phillip Adams , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian Magazine , 22-23 November 2008; (p. 42)
Indifference Has Robbed Generations of Our History Louis Nowra , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 27-28 December 2008; (p. 23)
Four Days of Great Films 2009 single work column
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 20 May no. 451 2009; (p. 41)
Film is the New Black Michaela Boland , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australian Financial Review , 6-7 June 2009; (p. 28)
Breaking Out of Cinema's Dark Cube Michael Bodey , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 9 February 2011; (p. 17)
The 2011 BigPond Adelaide Film Festival has supported Indigenous talent as part of this year's festival.
Beyond Good/Should/Bad : Teaching Australian Indigenous Film and Television Therese Davis , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 24 no. 5 2010; (p. 799 - 804)
Ckear-Eyed Lens Gives Complex Stories Focus Michael Bodey , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 23 November 2011; (p. 15)
Reconciliation and the History Wars in Australian Cinema Felicity Collins , 2011-2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Exhuming Passions : The Pressure of the Past in Ireland and Australia 2012; (p. 207-222)
'When The Proposition ( a UK/Australia co-production, directed by John Hillcoat and scripted by Nick Cave) was released in 2005, film reviewers had no qualms about claiming this spectacular saga of colonial violence on the Queensland frontier as a 'history' film. A reviewer on BBC Radio 4 described The Proposition as 'a bushranger Western...set in violent 1880s Australian outback exposing the bitter racial tensions between English and Irish settlers. A Sunday Times review declared that 'Australia's brutal post-colonial history is stripped of all the lies in a bloody clash of cultures between the British police, the Irish bushrangers and the Aborigines.' Foregrounding the film's revisionist spectacle of colonial violence, an Australian reviewer predicted that, despite 'scenes of throat-cutting torture, rape and exploding heads...The Proposition could be the most accurate look at our national history yet'. (Author's introduction, 207)
Indigenous or Exotic? Trees in Australian Cinema Chris Mann , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Etropic : Electronic Journal of Studies in the Tropics , no. 10 2011; (p. 141-152)
'This article examines trees in three Australian films to assess if they are seen from a white point of view or an Indigenous point of view.' (Author's abstract)
Q&A Rachel Perkins 2010-2011 single work interview
— Appears in: SL : State Library of New South Wales Magazine , Summer vol. 3 no. 4 2010-2011; (p. 41)
y Witnessing Australian Stories : History, Testimony and Memory in Contemporary Culture Kelly Jean Butler , Melbourne : 2010 6037495 2010 single work thesis

'This book is about how Australians have responded to stories about suffering and injustice in Australia, presented in a range of public media, including literature, history, films, and television. Those who have responded are both ordinary and prominent Australians–politicians, writers, and scholars. All have sought to come to terms with Australia's history by responding empathetically to stories of its marginalized citizens.

'Drawing upon international scholarship on collective memory, public history, testimony, and witnessing, this book represents a cultural history of contemporary Australia. It examines the forms of witnessing that dominated Australian public culture at the turn of the millennium. Since the late 1980s, witnessing has developed in Australia in response to the increasingly audible voices of indigenous peoples, migrants, and more recently, asylum seekers. As these voices became public, they posed a challenge not only to scholars and politicians, but also, most importantly, to ordinary citizens.

'When former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd delivered his historic apology to Australia's indigenous peoples in February 2008, he performed an act of collective witnessing that affirmed the testimony and experiences of Aboriginal Australians. The phenomenon of witnessing became crucial, not only to the recognition and reparation of past injustices, but to efforts to create a more cosmopolitan Australia in the present. This is a vital addition to Transactions critically acclaimed Memory and Narrative series.' (Publisher's blurb)

Awards

2009 winner New South Wales Premier's Literary Awards Betty Roland Prize for Scriptwriting
2009 winner Logie Awards Most Outstanding Documentary
2009 shortlisted AWGIE Awards Documentary Public Broadcast For episode three by Louis Nowra and Beck Cole.
2009 winner AWGIE Awards Documentary Public Broadcast For episode one by Rachel Perkins and Louis Nowra.
2009 winner Australian Film Institute Awards Best Documentary
2008 shortlisted Western Australian Premier's Book Awards Scripts For episode six by Louis Nowra and Beck Cole.
Last amended 13 Oct 2015 11:35:45
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