Tony Kevin i(9 works by)
Born: Established: 1943 Sydney, New South Wales, ;
Gender: Male
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BiographyHistory

Tony Kevin grew up in Sydney and Canberra, and moved permanently to the Canberra region at age 25 to begin work in the then External Affairs Department. Kevin served in diplomatic posts in Moscow, New York, Warsaw and Phnom Penh, the latter two as ambassador. He retired from diplomacy (and the public service) in 1998. Kevin also worked in the Prime Minister's Department and has been a Visiting Fellow at the Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University.

Awards for Works

A Certain Maritime Incident : The Sinking of SIEV X , 2004 single work non-fiction In October 2001, over 400 asylum-seekers departed from Indonesia in a grossly overcrowded, rickety boat bound for Australia. Somewhere between the two countries the boat sank with a huge loss of life - 353 of the asylum seekers drowned. This is an examination of the event, the author's effort to spark a full-powers inquiry.
2008 inaugural winner Eureka Street/Reader's Feast Award
2005 winner New South Wales Premier's Literary Awards Community Relations Commission Award
2005 shortlisted The Age Book of the Year Award Non-Fiction Prize
2005 winner Australian Capital Territory Book of the Year Award
Walking the Camino : A Modern Pilgrimage to Santiago , 2007 single work autobiography

'In May 2006, armed only with a small rucksack and a staff, Tony Kevin, an overweight, sedentary, 63-year-old former diplomat, set off on an eight-week trek across Spain. But this was not just a very long walk - it was a pilgrimage.

'From Granada, in the southeast, to Santiago de Compostela, in the far northwest, Tony followed the Via Mozarabe and the Via de la Plata, two of the many pilgrim trails that crisscross Spain and Portugal and that all lead to a single destination. In the Middle Ages, the cathedral city of Santiago de Compostela was Europe's most famous centre of pilgrimage, and in recent years it has enjoyed a remarkable revival; every day towards noon, hundreds of hot, tired, and dusty pilgrims stream into Santiago Cathedral for the daily Pilgrim's Mass.

'What, in our busy, materialistic 21st century, is this apparently anachronistic phenomenon all about? What drives tens of thousands of people of all nationalities and creeds to make long, exhausting walks across the cold mountains and hot tablelands of Spain, to take part finally in a mediaeval Christian liturgy of spiritual renewal and reconciliation with God?

'Walking the Camino beautifully captures the flavour of what it was like to walk the camino, and is filled with fascinating observations and anecdotes about the nature of contemporary Spain. And, unavoidably, because pilgrimage is such a deeply personal experience that has the potential to unlock the deepest recesses of hidden memory and conscience, it is also a profound personal meditation on the nature of modern life.' (Publisher's blurb)

2008 winner Australian Capital Territory Book of the Year Award
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