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y Jack Maggs single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1997 1997
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

The year is 1837 and a stranger is prowling London. He is Jack Maggs, an illegal returnee from the prison island of Australia. He has the demeanor of a savage and the skills of a hardened criminal, and he is risking his life on seeking vengeance and reconciliation.
Influenced by Charles Dickens's Great Expectations.

Notes

  • Other formats: Also braille, sound recording, large print.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Faber , 1997 .
      Extent: 327p.
      ISBN: 057119088X
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Knopf , 1998 .
      Extent: 306p.
      ISBN: 0679440089
    • Toronto, Ontario,
      c
      Canada,
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Random House Canada , 1998 .
      4271035861505996155.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 306p.
      ISBN: 0679309187
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Faber , 2011 .
      414146000079144875.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 327p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 3 February 2011
      ISBN: 9780571270170
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 2015 .
      Extent: 352p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 22 April 2015
      ISBN: 9780143571278
Language: Dutch

Works about this Work

Peter Carey's Jack Maggs : Re-Doing Dickens's Re-Doings of Dickens C. Kenneth Pellow , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers on Language and Literature : A Journal for Scholars and Critics of Language and Literature , Winter vol. 49 no. 1 2013; (p. 86-108)
Antipodean Rewritings of Great Expectations : Peter Carey's Jack Maggs (1997) and Lloyd Jones's Mister Pip (2007) Janet Wilson , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Shadow of the Precursor 2012; (p. 220-235)
'Counter-discourse theory urges readings of postcolonial fictions that are renarrativisations of canonical texts of empire in terms of their strategies of resistance. Recent novels by Peter Carey and Lloyd Jones amply acknowledge their debt to their precursor, Charles Dickens Great Expectations, but this chapter argues that the contestatory imperial relationship is overlaid with the equally compelling theme of postcolonial home and belonging. Carey exploits the oppositional "writing back" paradigm; Jones, by contrast, makes veneration of the Dickensian text central to his plot. Both, however, can also be described as diasporic novels in their preoccupation with the colony as home, as their colonial protagonists, after a fraught encounter with their Victorian heritage in the metropolitan centre of London, find their destiny/destination in the "return." Although this diasporic reading reiterates the familiar binaries of metropolitan centre and colonial periphery, it repositions the filial relationship as one of postcolonial habitation and settlement.' (220)
On the Genealogy of Democracy : Reading Peter Carey's Parrot and Olivier in America Peter Mathews , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 27 no. 2 2012; (p. 68-80)
Emotion, Motive, Narrative : Finding Heartland in Kim Scott’s Benang and Peter Carey’s Jack Maggs Victoria Genevieve Reeve , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 3 2012;
'In this essay, I want to explore the possibility that the success of narrative in stimulating empathy comes from the relation that narrative bears to emotion—where emotion is a kind of proto-narrative that possibly accounts for the structure and range of narratives themselves —and that our familiarity with emotions as micro-narratives results in the motivation of narrative. That is, the resolution of events occurs in terms of feeling rather than other forms of closure, since other forms of closure represent literal endings as, quite simply, the cessation of events whereas emotion achieves its end by being felt or translated in empathetic terms and in ways that endure beyond the formality of the fictive event that ends the narrative. I will be using Kim Scott's Benang: From the Heart (1999) and Peter Carey's Jack Maggs (1997) to discuss narrative and emotions, or the role of emotion in motivating narrative events and the role of narrative in conveying and stirring emotion in the reader.' (Author's abstract)
A Century of Oz Lit in China : A Critical Overview (1906-2008) Yu Ouyang , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 25 no. 1 2011; (p. 65-71)
‘This paper seeks to examine the dissemination, reception and perception of Australian literature in China from 1906 to 2008 by providng a historical background for its first arrival in China as a literature undistinguished from English or American literature, then as part of a ruoxiao minzu wenxue (weak and small nation literature) in the early 1930s, its rise as interest grew in Communist and proletarian writings in the 1950s and 1960s, and its spread and growth from the end of the cultural revolution in 1976 across all genres, culminating in its present unprecedented flourishing.’ (Introduction, p. 65)
Jack Maggs and Mister Pip - The Empire Strokes Back : Commonwealth Bibliophilia in Australasian Responses to Great Expectations Eric Martin , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Notes on Contemporary Literature , May vol. 41 no. 3 2011; (p. 2-5)
Sea-change or Atrophy? The Australian Convict Inheritance Cynthia Van Den Driesen , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 5 2011;
This paper is an offshoot of a larger project which explored the possibility for the erstwhile settler-colonizer undergoing the sea-change into settler-indigene emergent through a study of selected novels of Patrick White. It became apparent to me that the convict figure, who played an ancillary role in these works, could lay claim to the status of white indigene well ahead of the main protagonist. Robert Hughes (in The Fatal Shore) discredits the idea of any bonding between the convict and the Aborigine but acknowledges examples of "white blackfellas"—white men who had successfully been adopted into Aboriginal societies. Martin Tucker's nineteenth century work, Ralph Rashleigh, offers surprising testimony of a creative work which bears this out in a context where Australian literature generally reflected the national amnesia with regard to the Aborigine and barely accorded them human status. Grenville's The Secret River (2005), based broadly on the history of her own ancestor, appears to support Hughes' original contention but is also replete with ambivalences that work against a simple resolution. This paper will explore some of the ambivalences, the 'food for thought' on aspects of the Australian experience highlighted by these literary texts, and glances briefly also at variations on the theme in Carey's Jack Maggs and the The True Story of the Kelly Gang. (Author's abstract)
'As these fresh lines fade' : Narratives of Containment and Escape in Peter Carey's Jack Maggs Janet C. Myers , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature , September vol. 46 no. 3 2011; (p. 455-473)
'Drawing on recent work on settler colonialism, which emphasizes the ambivalence with which settler societies negotiated the complex ties between metropole and colony, this essay examines how such ambivalence is played out on multiple levels in Peter Carey's Jack Maggs, his postcolonial response to Charles Dickens' Great Expectations. This occurs both through the process of simultaneous resistance and accommodation that happens as Jack Maggs and Tobias Oates struggle for ownership of Maggs' story, which breaches the gap between England and Australia, and through the analogous process whereby Carey comes to terms with Dickens' depiction of Australia's ancestral history and offers his own re-interpretation of this classic story. Domesticity plays a crucial role in these complex negotiations because it is through an understanding of what "home" means that Jack Maggs—and by extension Carey—learn to disavow aspects of their English inheritance while reconciling other parts as integral to a uniquely Australian identity' (Author's abstract).
Literary Transculturations and Modernity : Some Reflections Anne Holden Ronning , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , November vol. 4 no. 1 2011;
'In an increasingly global world literary and cultural critics are constantly searching for ways in which to analyse and debate texts and artefacts. Postcolonial theories and studies have provided useful tools for analyzing, among others, New Literatures in English and other languages, as well as throwing new light on an understanding of older texts. But today, with the increase in diaspora studies in literature and cultural studies, new ways of looking at texts are paramount, given the complexity of contemporary literature. There is, as Bill Ashcroft writes, a 'strange contrapuntal relationship between identity, history, and nation that needs to be unravelled.' With references to Australian literature, this article will present some reflections on transculturation and modernities, the themes of the Nordic Network of Transcultural Literary Studies, which considers transculturation not as a theory but, 'a matrix through which a set of critical tools and vocabularies can be refined for the study of texts from a localized world, but institutionalised globally' and where , ' the engagement of multiple sites and their routes with the progression of "one modernity" in some way or other inform the aesthetics of transcultural literature.' (Author's introduction)
Magwitch Madness : Archive Fever and the Teaching of Australian Literature in Subject English Larissa McLean-Davies , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Teaching Australian Literature : From Classroom Conversations to National Imaginings 2011; (p. 129-152)
'...Magwitch madness...has been inspired by Derrida's notion of 'archive fever' - the 'compulsive, repetitive and nostalgic desire for the archive, an irrepressible desire to return to the origin' (Derrida, 1998, p. 9). Like the convict Magwitch in Charles Dickens's novel, who is relocated to Australia, but remains imaginatively and materially linked to the centre of the Empire through his patronage of the boy Philip Pirrip (Pip), contemporary manifestations of Magwitch madness, whether they be in curriculum documents, media debates, text selection or pedagogical practices, are distinguished by a nostalgia for classic texts...and metaphorical and virtual proximity to the cultural capital that these classic works represent. ...

In this chapter, I will examine some contemporary manifestation of Magwitch madness in Some Australasian texts set for study in senior English. Thorough this analysis, I will pursue the connection between these texts and a more systemic manifestation of this condition in the recent debate around the teaching of Australian literature and in the Australian Curriculum: English. In the final section of this chapter, I will explore the implications of Magwitch madness for classroom practice, by drawing on data collected in four diverse Victorian secondary schools in 2010 as part of the project National Stories: Teaching Australian Literature in Secondary English. Through the examination of these various and inter-connected expressions of antipodean archive fever in text, curriculum and practice, this chapter will map some of the complexities and challenges of teaching Australian literature in twenty-first century classrooms.' (From author's introduction, 130, 131-132)
Antipodean Perspectives in Peter Carey's 'Jack Maggs' Alessandra Squeo , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Textus : English Studies in Italy , May-August vol. 24 no. 2 2011; (p. 263-282)
Settler Post-Colonialism and Australian Literary Culture Anna Johnston , Alan Lawson , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 28-40)
'This essay begins by mapping the place of settler postcolonialism in postcolonial studies, and its relevance to the Australian context. It then moves to demonstrate the applicability of settler postcolonial reading practices for Australian texts and contexts through two paradigmatic tropes: land and textuality.' Source: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory (2010)
Rewriting History : Theoretical Premises Andreas Gaile , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Rewriting History : Peter Carey's Fictional Biography of Australia 2010; (p. 17-28)

'What Peter Carey once said in an interview with regard to his method in Oscar and Lucinda holds true for all of the author's novels under scrutiny in this study. From Bliss to My Life as a Fake - the reader finds in Carey's writings a version of the Australian experience that is decidedly different from the reconstrustionist account that traditional history books used to offer. Carey's fictional biography of his country bears two diametrically opposed signature traits. It conforms with Mark Twain's oft-quoted assessment of the Australian experience, used by Carey as an epigraph to Illywhacker: 'Australian history is almost always picturesque...It does not read like history, but like the most beautiful lies.' At the same time, there is a distinct feeling of authenticity, of dealing with empirically analysable data, evidence from the past that is presented to the reader through a seemingly objective narrating agency.' (p. 17)

Strategies of an Illywhacker (II) : Transcending Historical Reality Andreas Gaile , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Rewriting History : Peter Carey's Fictional Biography of Australia 2010; (p. 59-82)
'Over the past twenty years Peter Carey has made it sufficiently clear that for lack of a fail-safe way of determining the one true history attempts at representing a past reality must necessarily falter or end in a philosophical impasse. Realism as a literary device has been a constant in Carey's writings, though. As a mode of narration, it simulates the truth, or at least creates a semblance of truth and probability and suggests to the reader that the narrated events could actually have happened this way in the extratextual world.' (p. 59)
'Decolonizing the Mind' (I) : Colonial Australia Andreas Gaile , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Rewriting History : Peter Carey's Fictional Biography of Australia 2010; (p. 151-191)
'All of Peter Carey's novels as well as many of the short stories, I shall argue, engage in a decolonizing programme. If one were to read all of Carey's books in one sitting, one of the mandates of postcolonialism, namely to 'decolonize the mind' (phrase coined by Ngugi wa Thiont'o), would emerge as one of the writer's primary concerns...The stories Carey tells provide evidence of three successive generations of colonial overlords in Australia: the British Empire in colonial times; the United states, which took over cultural and economic overlordship after the British Empire collapsed; and multinational trusts (with moneyed interests from Japan and the United States) in what is technically speaking a postcolonial, but in reality a neo-colonial country. Spanning roughly one and a half centuries of Australian history, Carey's oeuvre thus gives a diachronical overview of the experience of a colonized culture.' (p 151)
The Real Matilda : Re-Inscribing the 'Pygmies' of Australian Culture Andreas Gaile , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Rewriting History : Peter Carey's Fictional Biography of Australia 2010; (p. 235-251)
'In his novels, Carey entitles women, the doubly colonized sex in Australian cultural history, to a voice in history and re-inscribes them into the Australian tradition. His novels feature all sorts of strong-willed and charismatic women: Lucinda and Eliabeth Leplastrier in Oscar and Lucinda, the snake-dancer Leah Goldstein and Phoebe McGrath in Illywhacker, Ellen Kelly in True History of the Kelly Gang, Mercy Larkin in Jack Maggs and Felicity Smith in The Unusual Life of Tristan Smith. They all stand their ground in an essentially hostile patriarchal society. With these female characters the author not only reallocates those of his biographee's character traits traditionally associated with a particular sex, but he also actually rewrites the roles of men and especially women have played in Australian history.' (p. 237)
Wrong About Carey? : Reading Carey in Post-Postmodern Times Andreas Gaile , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Rewriting History : Peter Carey's Fictional Biography of Australia 2010; (p. 285-298)
Peter Carey : At Home in Australia, New York and Writing Charles McGrath , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The New York Times , 27 April 2010; (p. 1)
Paradigma ’uzvraćanja pisanjem’ u romanu 'Džek Megs' Pitera Kerija Nataša Kampmark , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Godišnjak Filozofskog fakulteta u Novom Sadu , vol. 35 no. 2 2010; (p. 75-82)
Post Colonialism and Literary Criticism in Australia Post-Colonialism and Literary Criticism in Australia Leigh Dale , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Down Under : Australian Literary Studies Reader 2009; (p. 95-105) Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 14-27)
'In this essay I want to lay out the context for the development of the study of post-colonial literatures and post-colonial reading strategies, then move on to consider in a little more detail some significant aspects of the field in its early form. I will conclude by examining the effects of post-colonial criticism on ways of reading the work of three Australian writers: Judith Wright, Randolph Stow, and Patrick White' (95).
Untitled Melissa Bellanta , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: JAS Review of Books , April no. 14 2003;

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey 1997 single work novel ; The Unusual Life of Tristan Smith Peter Carey 1994 single work novel ; Oscar and Lucinda Peter Carey 1988 single work novel ; Illywhacker Peter Carey 1985 single work novel ; The Tax Inspector Peter Carey 1991 single work novel ; Collected Stories Peter Carey 1994 selected work short story
Second Look Peter Craven , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 5 September 2004; (p. 23)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey 1997 single work novel
Untitled Bharat Tandon , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die 2006; (p. 860)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey 1997 single work novel
Carey Lives Up to Great Expectations Lucy Frost , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 10 August 1997; (p. 7)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey 1997 single work novel
Comeuppance from Down Under in Dickens of a Book Erica Wagner , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: The Times , 18 September 1997; (p. 43)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey 1997 single work novel
Criminal Concerns David Nokes , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 12 September no. 4928 1997; (p. 8)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey 1997 single work novel
Exceeding Expectations A. P. Riemer , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 9 August 1997; (p. 11)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey 1997 single work novel
Expect It from Carey Katharine England , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 9 August 1997; (p. 19)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey 1997 single work novel
Fulfilling Great Expectations Helen Daniel , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 9 August 1997; (p. 7)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey 1997 single work novel
Great Expectations of the Afterlife Peter Pierce , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 2 September vol. 116 no. 6087 1997; (p. 75)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey 1997 single work novel
Great Incantations Gillian Fulcher , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 9 August 1997; (p. wkd 7)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey 1997 single work novel
Homage to Dickens Peter Craven , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 2-3 August 1997; (p. rev 7)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey 1997 single work novel
Life Defies Art in Peter Carey's Novel Carolyn Bliss , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 11 no. 1 1997; (p. 47,48)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey 1997 single work novel
New Worlds for Old Peter Porter , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian's Review of Books , August vol. 2 no. 7 1997; (p. 4-5,30)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey 1997 single work novel
Return of the Repressed Brian Kiernan , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Spring no. 148 1997; (p. 77-79)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey 1997 single work novel
The Magwitch Connection Gillian Fulcher , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: The Mercury , 22 September 1997; (p. 26)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey 1997 single work novel
The Risks of Following Dreams Gillian Fulcher , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 9 August 1997; (p. C11)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey 1997 single work novel
Untitled Craig Cormick , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: Blast , Spring-Summer no. 35 1997-1998; (p. 27)

— Review of Collected Stories Gillian Mears 1997 selected work short story ; Pornography, Heroin and Government: Ten Tales from the City of Roundabouts 1997 anthology short story ; Jack Maggs Peter Carey 1997 single work novel
What the Dickens... Michael McGirr , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: Eureka Street , September vol. 7 no. 7 1997; (p. 43-44)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey 1997 single work novel
What the Dickens Greg Manning , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: LiNQ , October vol. 24 no. 2 1997; (p. 118-123)

— Review of Jack Maggs Peter Carey 1997 single work novel
Peter Carey's Jack Maggs and the Trauma of Convictisn Elizabeth Francesca Ho , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 17 no. 2 2003; (p. 124-132)
Writing Nineteenth-Century Fiction in the Twentieth Century Robert Sirabian , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Publications of the Mississippi Philological Association 2002; (p. 53-60)
Rewriting the Empire of the Imagination: The Post-Imperial Gothic K. J. Renk , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Journal of Commonwealth Literature , vol. 39 no. 2 2004; (p. 61-71)
Renk's thesis is that Carey and Byatt 'parody the style and conventions of Victorian literature, as they also critique and satirize the Imperial Gothic novel.' She argues that 'while the Imperial Gothic novel reveals the anxieties of ebbing Empire, the Post-Imperial Gothic novel [of Carey and Byatt] exposes how Victorian writers plundered the minds of the marinalized to create art p.62).
Concealed Meaning in Peter Carey's Jack Maggs Trevor Byrne , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: The CRNLE Reviews Journal , no. 1-2 1995; (p. 106-115)
Byrne discusses Carey's novel as being essentially an exploration of the process of fictional writing, inviting the reader to think about what underlies the process of selectivity involved in creating stories.
A Ghost Story in Two Parts : Charles Dickens, Peter Carey, and Avenging Phantoms Alice Brittan , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 21 no. 4 2004; (p. 40-55)
In Another Place : Postcolonial Perspectives on Reading Louise Yelin , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Sites : Social Difference and Reader Response 2004; (p. 83-107)
A Question of Character that Runs and Runs Michelle Griffin , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 7 May 2005; (p. 3)
Missed Encounters: Repetition, Rewriting, and Contemporary Returns to Charles Dickens's Great Expectations Ankhi Mukherjee , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Contemporary Literature , Spring vol. 46 no. 1 2005; (p. 108-133) Dickens Adapted 2012; (p. 461-486)

'This article looks at rewritings of a well-made Victorian multiplot novel completed in 1862, Charles Dickens's Great Expectations, to explore the dynamic between precursor and latecomer in terms of narrative operation. I am particularly interested in the remembering and reinterpreation of the literary canon, in acts of generative citation that bring the (Eurocentric) literary past to recurring life. The first section looks briefly at Kathy Acker's and Sue Roe's extrapolations of the classic and at Alfonso Curaron's 1998 film. The second section is a reading of Peter Carey's brilliant Dickensian pastiche Jack Maggs.' (p.109)

Heritage in Peter Carey's 'Jack Maggs' Colette Selles , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Commonwealth , Autumn vol. 27 no. 1 2004; (p. 63-75) Dickens Adapted 2012; (p. 447-459)
Author's abstract: Rewriting Dickens's Great Expectations through Jack Maggs, Carey revisits the English literary heritage and the values of nineteenth-century England. This paper examines how Carey reconsiders that tradition and, from his postcolonial position, questions Britain's cultural and social heritage to present Australia as a new haven offering redemption and regeneration, the possibility of overcoming the haunting heritage of one's origins and past, which allegorically refers to the former colony itself (63).
Kinds of Captivity in Peter Carey's Fiction Peter Pierce , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Fabulating Beauty : Perspectives on the Fiction of Peter Carey 2005; (p. 71-82)
Discusses one of the most conspicuous motifs in Carey's fictions (and in postcolonial literatures in general): that of captivity.
Peter Carey's Jack Maggs : An Aussie Story? Annegret Maack , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Fabulating Beauty : Perspectives on the Fiction of Peter Carey 2005; (p. 229-243)
'This essay explores Carey's debt to Dickens, his re-creation of historical London, and his metafictional blending of narratives. In addition, it sounds out the question of whether Carey's narrative transforms this material from an impersonal into an Aussie story' (227).
The Writing-back Paradigm Revisited : Peter Carey, Jack Maggs, and Charles Dickens, Great Expectations Barbara Schmidt-Haberkamp , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Fabulating Beauty : Perspectives on the Fiction of Peter Carey 2005; (p. 245-262)
'In her reading of the novel, [Schmidt-Haberkamp] shows how in Carey's novel the sequence of original text [Dickens's Great Expectations] and postcolonial reaction to it, which is central to the writing-back paradigm, are inverted' (Introduction to Fabulating Beauty xxxii).
Unsettling Illusions : Carey and Capital in Jack Maggs Bruce Woodcock , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Fabulating Beauty : Perspectives on the Fiction of Peter Carey 2005; (p. 263-273)
Discusses intertextual relations between Jack Maggs and Karl Marx's Das Kapital.
'Lies and Silences' : Cultural Masterplots and Existential Authenticity in Peter Carey's True History of the Kelly Gang Carolyn Bliss , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Fabulating Beauty : Perspectives on the Fiction of Peter Carey 2005; (p. 275-300)
The critical intention of this article is to examine 'storytelling and/or the inhabiting of cultural masterplots as sites at which characters (and finally, inevitably, the author himself) are faced with the challenge of seeking or escaping authentic selfhood or existential good faith, in the Sartrean sense' (276).
y Witnessing the Past : History and Post-Colonialism in Australian Historical Novels Sigrun Meinig , Tubingen : Gunter Narr , 2004 Z1239368 2004 single work criticism
Bread and Sirkuses : Empire and Culture in Peter Carey's The Unusual Life of Tristan Smith and Jack Maggs James Bradley , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , vol. 56 no. 3-4 1997; (p. 657-665) The New York Review of Science Fiction , January no. 101 1997; (p. 17-19)
The Unexamined Life Ramona Koval (interviewer), 1997 single work interview
— Appears in: Meanjin , vol. 56 no. 3-4 1997; (p. 666-682)
'Magwitch Is Really My Ancestor' : Interview with Peter Carey Igor Maver (interviewer), 2006 single work interview
— Appears in: Critics and Writers Speak : Revisioning Post-Colonial Studies 2006; (p. 155-159)
Carey comments on the positioning of his work within Australian, postcolonial, and Commonwealth literatures. He also comments on the use of history in fiction (True History of the Kelly Gang) and the relationship between Jack Maggs and Great Expectations.
The 'Crooked Business' of Storytelling : Authorship and Cultural Revisionism in Peter Carey's Jack Maggs Laura E. Savu , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ariel , July-October vol. 36 no. 3-4 2005; (p. 127-163) Dickens Adapted 2012; (p. 487-523)
y Peter Carey et la quete postcoloniale d'une identite australianne Sue Ryan-Fazilleau , Paris : L'Harmattan , 2007 Z1498656 2007 single work criticism 'Peter Carey est l'un des plus grands auteurs australiens contemporains. La plupart de ses romans explorent la notion d'identité australienne. Cet ouvrage suit l'évolution de cette quête identitaire chez Carey à travers l'étude de ses romans postcoloniaux : Le Chemin du paradis, Illywhacker, Oscar et Lucinda, La Vie singulière de Tristan Smith et Jack Maggs. Cette approche coloniale prend fin au début des années 2000, même si la question de l'identité nationale continue à le préoccuper jusqu'en 2003' (publisher website).

Awards

1998 winner International Awards Commonwealth Writers Prize Overall Best Book Award
1998 winner International Awards Commonwealth Writers Prize South-East Asia and South Pacific Region Best Book from the Region Award
1998 winner Miles Franklin Literary Award
1997 winner The Age Book of the Year Award Fiction Prize
Last amended 9 Feb 2015 09:47:47
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