y The Ancestor Game single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1992 1992
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Notes

  • Dedication: For Ruth and Max Blatt.
  • Other formats: Also braille, sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Ringwood, Ringwood - Croydon - Kilsyth area, Melbourne - East, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 1992 .
      Extent: 302p.
      ISBN: 0140159878 (pbk.)
    • Minneapolis-St Paul, Minnesota,
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Graywolf Press , 1993 .
      Extent: 302p.
      ISBN: 1555972179
    • St Leonards, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 2000 .
      Extent: 302p.
      ISBN: 1865083151
    • Crows Nest, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 2003 .
      Extent: 302p.
      ISBN: 1741142261 (pbk.)
Language: Chinese
    • Chongqing,
      c
      China,
      c
      East Asia, South and East Asia, Asia,
      :
      Chongqing chu ban she , 1995 .
      Alternative title: Lang Zi
      Extent: 278p.
      Note/s:
      • Text in simplified Chinese script. Other names credited with translation process.
      ISBN: 7536631340
    • Taipei,
      c
      Taiwan,
      c
      East Asia, South and East Asia, Asia,
      :
      Mai Tian , 1996 .
      Alternative title: Zhu xian you xi
      Extent: 350p.
      Edition info: Chu ban.
      ISBN: 9577083811 (pbk.)
      Series: Xiao Shuo Tian Di Mai Tian (publisher), series - publisher Number in series: 31

Works about this Work

An Interpretation of Langtze's Artistic Complex in The Ancestor Game Du Yanping , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Oceanic Literary Studies , no. 2 2015; (p. 97-106)
'The Ancestor Game is a novel about the family history of immigrant Feng's four generation from Fujian, China to Australia with the theme of individual, land, history, thought and culture. The lifetime of the fourth generation Langtze is closely related with art. In the light of the thought of existential needs in the theory of personality by humanistic psychoanalyst Erich Fromm, readers can interpret the protagonist Langtze's artistic complex to better understand the excellent work.' (97)
Facts Key to Fiction Sally Pryor (interviewer), 2013 single work interview
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 25 April 2013; (p. 9)
'Alex Miller talks to Sally Pryor about faith, fiction - and duck dung'
Disestablished Worlds : An Introduction to the Novels of Alex Miller Robert Dixon , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 1-28)
The Mask of Fiction : A Memoir Alex Miller , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 29-41)
'I've been asked for a memoir for this occasion yet I am uncomfortable writing directly about myself. I prefer the mask of fiction. In this preference it is self-deception I fear most, for who but the self-deceived would claim to be able to write with moral detachment about themselves? I am also cautious of the fate of WB Yeats, the poet, of whom Richard Ellmann wrote, 'The autobiographical muse enticed him only to betray him, abandoning him to ultimate perplexity as to the meaning of his experiences' (Yeats, 2). Memoir does not offer us a sure means for contacting the deeper dualities of the self. For his journey to the heart of darkness, fiction is a more certain, if more oblique , way.' (Author's introduction)
Alex Miller and Leo Tolstoy : Australian Storytelling in a European Tradition Brenda Walker , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 42-54)
'Alex Miller may be Australia's greatest living writer. I certainly believe this to be the case. I base my view on the depth and range of his narrative preoccupations. He writes about love but his lovers often come from very different cultural backgrounds, and this illuminates what is foundational in love while respecting diversity in the most intimate of human connections. He writes with scrupulousness about the human complications of invasion, massacre and armed conflict. The American novelist Philip Roth writes that art is concerned with nuance, and politics cannot afford nuance (I Married a Communist, 223). Nuance is the most welcome and apparent characteristic of Miller understanding of the politics of territorial dispossession. He writes, also, about art and literature as cultural forces and as imperatives within the lives of individuals. In all his fiction, he is both a great writer and a great thinker. This chapter offers a much more brief appreciation of his work and thought then I would wish, more brief than it deserves. In it, I plan to consider Alex Miller and Tolstoy: both great writers, both great thinkers, especially on matters of love and war.' (Author's introduction 42)
Alex Miller : Migrant Writer Ingeborg van Teeseling , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 66-77)
'Alex Miller, a two-time winner of the Miles Franklin Literary Award, as written ten novels, all of them featuring protagonists who are outsiders, often in more ways than one. In most, if not all of them, Miller's narrators grapple with personal and societal questions of alienation. Miller's books offer sophisticated literary investigations into issues relating to the 'ownership' of place and landscape, the impossibility of an uncomplicated identity after migration, the role of history, and the nature of belonging and home. Critical reviews of his work have, over time, acknowledged this presence of migrant themes, but the connection between the migrancy of the writer and the content of his work has hardly ever been noted clearly. In fact, the Oxford Literary History of Australia categorises Miller, a little mystifyingly, as a 'non-migrant Australian writer' (Lever, 325). My argument here is that this is not just factually false, but that reading Miller's work as unproblematically Australian takes the sting out of what he is trying to say, and not just about the migrant experience but about Australia as well.' (Author's introduction 66)
The Presence of Absence in The Sitters Ronald A. Sharp , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 78-88)
'In the second paragraph of Alex Miller's The Sitters (1995) the narrator informs us that his memory of Jessica Keal allows him 'to approach the last enigma of my life - my family and my childhood. That cold legacy of silence and absence' (2). Bernadette Brennan's fine essay on The Sitters, in the context of Maurice Blanchot's meditations on death, notes that the narrator never explains 'why his experience with Jessica has given him the energy to begin painting...his childhood' (104). That it does so is indisputable, and Peter Pierce points us in the right direction, in his article on 'The Solitariness of Alex Miller', when he observes that Jessica functions as 'a Wordsworthian trigger to recover past 'spots of time'' (305). The connection between the frame of the entire narrative - and I use the word 'frame' not only to indicate a narrative frame but also in the sense of a picture frame, since this is a novel that foregrounds the connections between literary and visual art, between a novelist creating a character and a painter creating a portrait.' (Author's introduction 78)
Representing ‘the Other’ in the Fiction of Alex Miller Elizabeth Webby , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 114-124)
'Alex Miller began publishing his novels in 1988 at the end of a period of intense debate in literary circles about the ethics of representation, a debate informed by feminism, multiculturalism and postcolonialism. Put crudely, the debate was about whether white, male writers from first-world countries, the dominant literary players up to this point, should continue to have open slather in writing about their others, i.e. those who were not white or male, now that these others were at last finding their voices and writing back.

In Australia, the debate was particularly focused on the question of white writers' representation of Aboriginals. Indeed, in 1979 I was told, after giving a conference paper on colonial poems about Aboriginals, that I was lucky there were no Aboriginals in the audience. But in feminist circles male appropriation of female voices was also a major issue. Although a total ban on representations of others would clearly have meant the end of fiction as we know it, these debates did draw attention to the stereotyped representations of women, Aboriginals, Chinese and other 'others' found in much earlier Australian writing.

When I first read Alex Miller, soon after The Ancestor Game was published in 1992, I was struck by the unusual empathy shown here for his female characters and their predicaments, as well as by his insightful depictions of people from other cultures. These have continued to be hallmarks of his fiction, with representations of 'otherness' also extending to animals, especially in The Tivington Nott and Landscape of Farewell. My paper, however, will have as its focus The Ancestor Game, Conditions of Faith and Lovesong.' (Author's abstract)
Continental Heartlands and Alex Miller’s Geosophical Imaginary Elizabeth McMahon , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 125-138)
This chapter examines 'how the alignment between geography and subjectivity operates in four of Miller's novels to identify his refiguration of the inherited map of modern identities.' (125)
McMahon focuses on The Ancestor Game (1992), Conditions of Faith (2000), Journey to the Stone Country (2002) and Landscape of Farewell (2007).
Dougald's Goat : Alex Miller and the Species Barrier David Brooks , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 187-200)
'I would like to open with a proposition, a theory if you like, that, in a great many narratives , there is a place, a site, where they confess, or at least pay some acknowledgement to, the stories they have not followed in order to follow the story that they have. Their roadkil, one might facetiously term it, their rejectamenta, their abject. And it is not just stories, it is concepts as well, even or perhaps especially ethical positions: places, sites, where they acknowledge all that has had to be set aside in order for those stories, concepts and ethical positions to come to be. I do not say that they in any way specify or itemise them, or that this acknowledgement is anything but the vaguest symbolisation - indeed, it is so much a matter of the subconscious that it is hard to see how it could be - although in some cases they can take a pronounced and almost indisputable form. In one of the bold philosophical projects of which I sometimes dream, I would in fact go further and attempt to demonstrate a collateral premise that much of our human ethics are based upon a separation from and rejection - abjection is a better term, since this is a matter of our identity and what we do to shore it - of the animal, and that the animal therefore always haunts, unacknowledged, our ethical reflections. Miller's texts, I suggest, are ethical reflections, and so are haunted in this way.' (Author's introduction 187)
y Literary Migrations : White, English-Speaking Migrant Writers in Australia Ingeborg van Teeseling , Wollongong : 2011 Z1860612 2011 single work thesis 'In this thesis, I am arguing that [a] false core/periphery binary has made a particular group of migrants ,-those who are white and have migrated from English-speaking countries - invisible - invisible as migrants, that is. For the writers within this group, this leads to a critical blindness in relation to their work and place within Australian national literature. As a critic, however, I look at the work of Ruth Park, Alex Miller and John Mateer and see it is profoundly influenced by their migrant experience. More often than not they write about themes that are typical of migrant writing: alienation, identity, belonging, home, being in-between cultures, history. For a more appropriate, complete appreciation of their work, this thesis argues that it is imperative to go back to the beginning and return the 'default setting' of migrant to its literal meaning.' [From the author's abstract]
y Foreign Literature Studies vol. 31 no. 4 August 2009 Z1673155 2009 periodical issue
Liu fang ji gui jia : Lun A'liekesi Mile de Zu xian you xi Lili Ma , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Foreign Literature Studies , August vol. 31 no. 4 2009; (p. 150-154)
The Chinese Man in 'The Ancestor Game' Pan Zijie , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 67 no. 3 2007; (p. 96-110)
The Solitariness of Alex Miller Peter Pierce , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 21 no. 3 2004; (p. 299-311)
The article presents an overview of Alex Miller's literary career and development as a writer and examines his six novels published to date.
Who are the Custodians? 沈嘉蔚 , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 63 no. 1 2003; (p. 154-161)
Future Fusions and a Taste For the Past : Literature, History and the Imagination of Australianness Hsu-Ming Teo , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Historical Studies , vol. 33 no. 118 2002; (p. 126-139)
Author's abstract: This article begins with a discussion of the ways in which history and literature have been mutually dependent activities, then moves on to examine the usage of Australian history in Australian literature. It concludes with a consideration of the new historical directions contemporary Australian literature is taking in terms of 'fusion' literature and reflects on what this might suggest for the future practice of Australian history.
y States of Imagination : Nationalism and Multiculturalism in Australian and Southern Asian Literature John McLaren , New Delhi : Prestige Books Australian Scholarly Publishing , 2001 Z954104 2001 single work criticism
From European Satellite to Asian Backwater? Lars Jensen , 2000-2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Contemporary Issues in Australian Literature 2002; (p. 133-152) Australian Studies , Winter vol. 15 no. 2 2002; (p. 133-152)
Lars Jensen reads Adib Khan's Seasonal Adjustments in order to discuss 'how Australia looks from a comparative Asian perspective' (134).
The Scheherezade Motif in Recent Australian Fiction Set in China and Southeast Asia David Brooks , 2000 single work criticism
— Appears in: Interactions : Essays on the Literature and Culture of the Asia-Pacific Region 2000; (p. 75-85)
The Other : Historical, Geographical Enrique Martinez , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The CRNLE Reviews Journal , no. 2 1992; (p. 114-118)

— Review of The Ancestor Game Alex Miller 1992 single work novel
About Books : China Matters Nicholas Jose , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: National Library of Australia News , September vol. 2 no. 12 1992; (p. 8-10)

— Review of Mates of Mars David Foster 1991 single work novel ; The Hole Through the Centre of the World : A Novel Kevin Brophy 1991 single work novel ; After China Brian Castro 1992 single work novel ; La Mort de Napoleon Simon Leys 1986 single work novel ; The Yellow Lady : Australian Impressions of Asia Alison Broinowski 1992 single work criticism ; The Ancestor Game Alex Miller 1992 single work novel
Where Are You from Really? Sophie Masson , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 143 1992; (p. 4-5)

— Review of The Ancestor Game Alex Miller 1992 single work novel
Trapped in an Ancestral Mirror Helen Daniel , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 15 August 1992; (p. 9)

— Review of The Ancestor Game Alex Miller 1992 single work novel
Fruitful Mating of Cultures Gerard Windsor , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 15-16 August 1992; (p. rev 4)

— Review of The Ancestor Game Alex Miller 1992 single work novel
Exiles from the Past A. P. Riemer , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 15 August 1992; (p. 43)

— Review of The Ancestor Game Alex Miller 1992 single work novel
Paperbacks Stan Barney , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 30 August 1992; (p. 24)

— Review of Blood Stained Wattle Maria Gardner 1992 single work novel ; The Ancestor Game Alex Miller 1992 single work novel
Giving the Past Away Peter Pierce , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 15 September vol. 114 no. 5837 1992; (p. 100-101)

— Review of The Ancestor Game Alex Miller 1992 single work novel
Coming to Terms with Exile Susan Geason , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 6 September 1992; (p. 118)

— Review of The Ancestor Game Alex Miller 1992 single work novel
"There is Another World and It Is Here" : Alex Miller's New Novel Thomas Shapcott , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Spring no. 128 1992; (p. 79-81)

— Review of The Ancestor Game Alex Miller 1992 single work novel
When Cultural Loyalties Clash Katharine England , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser Magazine , 12 December 1992; (p. 5)

— Review of The Crocodile Fury Beth Yahp 1992 single work novel ; The Ancestor Game Alex Miller 1992 single work novel
Miller Reveals His Agility in Chinese-Australian Mystery Jack Neate , 1993 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 23 January 1993; (p. wkd 7)

— Review of The Ancestor Game Alex Miller 1992 single work novel
Untitled Ursula E. Antony , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Multicultural Book Review , vol. 3 no. 3 1995; (p. 31)

— Review of The Ancestor Game Alex Miller 1992 single work novel
Out of the Orient Yu Ouyang , 1992 single work review
— Appears in: Modern Times , September no. 7 1992; (p. 30-31) Bias : Offensively Chinese/Australian : A Collection of Essays on China and Australia 2007; (p. 64-67)

— Review of The Ancestor Game Alex Miller 1992 single work novel ; After China Brian Castro 1992 single work novel
Who are the Custodians? 沈嘉蔚 , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 63 no. 1 2003; (p. 154-161)
The Solitariness of Alex Miller Peter Pierce , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 21 no. 3 2004; (p. 299-311)
The article presents an overview of Alex Miller's literary career and development as a writer and examines his six novels published to date.
The Ancestor Complex : The Theme of The Ancestor Game 黄源深 , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: A Unique Literature : A Critical View of Australian Literary Works 1995; (p. 234-251)
From European Satellite to Asian Backwater? Lars Jensen , 2000-2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Contemporary Issues in Australian Literature 2002; (p. 133-152) Australian Studies , Winter vol. 15 no. 2 2002; (p. 133-152)
Lars Jensen reads Adib Khan's Seasonal Adjustments in order to discuss 'how Australia looks from a comparative Asian perspective' (134).
The Chinese Man in 'The Ancestor Game' Pan Zijie , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 67 no. 3 2007; (p. 96-110)
In Touch with the Displaced Alex Miller , 1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 20 November 1993; (p. 13A) The Age , 20 November 1993; (p. 8)
Aex Miller : The Man Behind the Writer Laurent Boulanger (interviewer), 1994 single work interview
— Appears in: Stet , no. 3 1994; (p. 5-8)
y Foreign Literature Studies vol. 31 no. 4 August 2009 Z1673155 2009 periodical issue
Liu fang ji gui jia : Lun A'liekesi Mile de Zu xian you xi Lili Ma , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Foreign Literature Studies , August vol. 31 no. 4 2009; (p. 150-154)
y Literary Migrations : White, English-Speaking Migrant Writers in Australia Ingeborg van Teeseling , Wollongong : 2011 Z1860612 2011 single work thesis 'In this thesis, I am arguing that [a] false core/periphery binary has made a particular group of migrants ,-those who are white and have migrated from English-speaking countries - invisible - invisible as migrants, that is. For the writers within this group, this leads to a critical blindness in relation to their work and place within Australian national literature. As a critic, however, I look at the work of Ruth Park, Alex Miller and John Mateer and see it is profoundly influenced by their migrant experience. More often than not they write about themes that are typical of migrant writing: alienation, identity, belonging, home, being in-between cultures, history. For a more appropriate, complete appreciation of their work, this thesis argues that it is imperative to go back to the beginning and return the 'default setting' of migrant to its literal meaning.' [From the author's abstract]
Disestablished Worlds : An Introduction to the Novels of Alex Miller Robert Dixon , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 1-28)
The Mask of Fiction : A Memoir Alex Miller , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 29-41)
'I've been asked for a memoir for this occasion yet I am uncomfortable writing directly about myself. I prefer the mask of fiction. In this preference it is self-deception I fear most, for who but the self-deceived would claim to be able to write with moral detachment about themselves? I am also cautious of the fate of WB Yeats, the poet, of whom Richard Ellmann wrote, 'The autobiographical muse enticed him only to betray him, abandoning him to ultimate perplexity as to the meaning of his experiences' (Yeats, 2). Memoir does not offer us a sure means for contacting the deeper dualities of the self. For his journey to the heart of darkness, fiction is a more certain, if more oblique , way.' (Author's introduction)
Alex Miller and Leo Tolstoy : Australian Storytelling in a European Tradition Brenda Walker , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 42-54)
'Alex Miller may be Australia's greatest living writer. I certainly believe this to be the case. I base my view on the depth and range of his narrative preoccupations. He writes about love but his lovers often come from very different cultural backgrounds, and this illuminates what is foundational in love while respecting diversity in the most intimate of human connections. He writes with scrupulousness about the human complications of invasion, massacre and armed conflict. The American novelist Philip Roth writes that art is concerned with nuance, and politics cannot afford nuance (I Married a Communist, 223). Nuance is the most welcome and apparent characteristic of Miller understanding of the politics of territorial dispossession. He writes, also, about art and literature as cultural forces and as imperatives within the lives of individuals. In all his fiction, he is both a great writer and a great thinker. This chapter offers a much more brief appreciation of his work and thought then I would wish, more brief than it deserves. In it, I plan to consider Alex Miller and Tolstoy: both great writers, both great thinkers, especially on matters of love and war.' (Author's introduction 42)
Alex Miller : Migrant Writer Ingeborg van Teeseling , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 66-77)
'Alex Miller, a two-time winner of the Miles Franklin Literary Award, as written ten novels, all of them featuring protagonists who are outsiders, often in more ways than one. In most, if not all of them, Miller's narrators grapple with personal and societal questions of alienation. Miller's books offer sophisticated literary investigations into issues relating to the 'ownership' of place and landscape, the impossibility of an uncomplicated identity after migration, the role of history, and the nature of belonging and home. Critical reviews of his work have, over time, acknowledged this presence of migrant themes, but the connection between the migrancy of the writer and the content of his work has hardly ever been noted clearly. In fact, the Oxford Literary History of Australia categorises Miller, a little mystifyingly, as a 'non-migrant Australian writer' (Lever, 325). My argument here is that this is not just factually false, but that reading Miller's work as unproblematically Australian takes the sting out of what he is trying to say, and not just about the migrant experience but about Australia as well.' (Author's introduction 66)
The Presence of Absence in The Sitters Ronald A. Sharp , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 78-88)
'In the second paragraph of Alex Miller's The Sitters (1995) the narrator informs us that his memory of Jessica Keal allows him 'to approach the last enigma of my life - my family and my childhood. That cold legacy of silence and absence' (2). Bernadette Brennan's fine essay on The Sitters, in the context of Maurice Blanchot's meditations on death, notes that the narrator never explains 'why his experience with Jessica has given him the energy to begin painting...his childhood' (104). That it does so is indisputable, and Peter Pierce points us in the right direction, in his article on 'The Solitariness of Alex Miller', when he observes that Jessica functions as 'a Wordsworthian trigger to recover past 'spots of time'' (305). The connection between the frame of the entire narrative - and I use the word 'frame' not only to indicate a narrative frame but also in the sense of a picture frame, since this is a novel that foregrounds the connections between literary and visual art, between a novelist creating a character and a painter creating a portrait.' (Author's introduction 78)
Representing ‘the Other’ in the Fiction of Alex Miller Elizabeth Webby , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 114-124)
'Alex Miller began publishing his novels in 1988 at the end of a period of intense debate in literary circles about the ethics of representation, a debate informed by feminism, multiculturalism and postcolonialism. Put crudely, the debate was about whether white, male writers from first-world countries, the dominant literary players up to this point, should continue to have open slather in writing about their others, i.e. those who were not white or male, now that these others were at last finding their voices and writing back.

In Australia, the debate was particularly focused on the question of white writers' representation of Aboriginals. Indeed, in 1979 I was told, after giving a conference paper on colonial poems about Aboriginals, that I was lucky there were no Aboriginals in the audience. But in feminist circles male appropriation of female voices was also a major issue. Although a total ban on representations of others would clearly have meant the end of fiction as we know it, these debates did draw attention to the stereotyped representations of women, Aboriginals, Chinese and other 'others' found in much earlier Australian writing.

When I first read Alex Miller, soon after The Ancestor Game was published in 1992, I was struck by the unusual empathy shown here for his female characters and their predicaments, as well as by his insightful depictions of people from other cultures. These have continued to be hallmarks of his fiction, with representations of 'otherness' also extending to animals, especially in The Tivington Nott and Landscape of Farewell. My paper, however, will have as its focus The Ancestor Game, Conditions of Faith and Lovesong.' (Author's abstract)
Continental Heartlands and Alex Miller’s Geosophical Imaginary Elizabeth McMahon , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 125-138)
This chapter examines 'how the alignment between geography and subjectivity operates in four of Miller's novels to identify his refiguration of the inherited map of modern identities.' (125)
McMahon focuses on The Ancestor Game (1992), Conditions of Faith (2000), Journey to the Stone Country (2002) and Landscape of Farewell (2007).
Dougald's Goat : Alex Miller and the Species Barrier David Brooks , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 187-200)
'I would like to open with a proposition, a theory if you like, that, in a great many narratives , there is a place, a site, where they confess, or at least pay some acknowledgement to, the stories they have not followed in order to follow the story that they have. Their roadkil, one might facetiously term it, their rejectamenta, their abject. And it is not just stories, it is concepts as well, even or perhaps especially ethical positions: places, sites, where they acknowledge all that has had to be set aside in order for those stories, concepts and ethical positions to come to be. I do not say that they in any way specify or itemise them, or that this acknowledgement is anything but the vaguest symbolisation - indeed, it is so much a matter of the subconscious that it is hard to see how it could be - although in some cases they can take a pronounced and almost indisputable form. In one of the bold philosophical projects of which I sometimes dream, I would in fact go further and attempt to demonstrate a collateral premise that much of our human ethics are based upon a separation from and rejection - abjection is a better term, since this is a matter of our identity and what we do to shore it - of the animal, and that the animal therefore always haunts, unacknowledged, our ethical reflections. Miller's texts, I suggest, are ethical reflections, and so are haunted in this way.' (Author's introduction 187)
A Meeting at The Australia Chinese Writers' Association Maria-Louise Stephens , 1994 single work prose
— Appears in: Australian Multicultural Book Review , vol. 2 no. 1 1994; (p. 53)
Stephens writes: 'Australia Post brought me an invitation to a symposium taking place at the end of November 1993 in the Chinese Community Cultural Centre in Little Bourke Street, Melbourne. Kathryn Purnell and I went as representatives of the Australian Association of Multicultural Writers' (p. 53).
Facts Key to Fiction Sally Pryor (interviewer), 2013 single work interview
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 25 April 2013; (p. 9)
'Alex Miller talks to Sally Pryor about faith, fiction - and duck dung'
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