Is part of Australian Pocket Library Series series - publisher
Issue Details: First known date: 1905 1905
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Notes

  • Also published in braille

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Alexander Moring , 1905 .
      Extent: 107p.
      Description: illus., map.
      Note/s:
      • Several impressions printed, some giving the author as Jeannie Gunn.
Alternative title: The Little Black Princess of the Never-Never
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Hodder and Stoughton , 1909 .
      Extent: 107p.
      Edition info: New and rev. edition
      Description: illus., port., map.
  • Appears in:
    y The Australian Wonder Book Melbourne : Home Entertainment Library , 1935 Z1001067 1935 anthology children's fiction children's Melbourne : Home Entertainment Library , 1935 pg. [10]-92

Works about this Work

Traversing the Unfamiliar : German Translations of Aboriginality in James Vance Marshall’s The Children and Phillip Gwynne’s Deadly Unna? and Nukkin Ya Leah Gerber , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 1 2014;

'The tendency for Western cultures to emphasise imperial attitudes and experiences in their literature has been described by Edward Said as the primary means by which colonised people assert their identity and the existence of their own history (xii). The tradition of Australian children’s literature, which first grew out of contributions made by European colonisers and largely ignored any indigenous past has been referred to as a “product of colonial history” (Bradford, “Representing Indigeneity” 90) and “a shamelessly racist catalogue of prejudice and misinformation, of superficial clichés, offensive stereotyping and entirely subjective interpretation” (McVitty 7). Historians Robert Hodge and Vijay Mishra use the term Aboriginalism – a variation of Said’s notion of Orientalism – to describe the way in which colonial powers traditionally constructed ideas about the colonised other within patterns of discourse, aptly masking their racist objective and appearing to function constructively (27).

'Focusing on three Australian children’s texts translated into German, this paper examines how the notion of Aboriginality – at different points in time – is presented in the source text and dealt with in translation. While consideration of the purpose – the skopos (Vermeer 1989/2004) – of the translation forming the backbone of contemporary translation theory, the so-called aims of children’s literary translation also cast an important light on the way in which translation strategies are informed. Furthering the international outlook and understanding of young readers remains the most commonly agreed-upon objective of children’s literary translation. In real terms, the execution of this aim often comes down to the decision to foreignise or domesticate. The problem, as translator Anthea Bell writes, is that “one wants readers of the translated text to feel that they are getting the real book, as close as possible to the original”, but which – vitally – includes respecting the foreign aspects of the source text (62). Yet translators of children’s literature (unlike translators of adult literature) have the added challenge of having to negotiate a variety of what Katharina Reiss calls ‘Vermittlerinstanzen’ (intermediaries): parents, teachers, librarians and publishers, who place pressure on the translator (in regards to taboos and pedagogical aspects of the text), so much so that the outcome (i.e. the target text) is affected (7).' (Publication abstract)

A Persisting Fascination : German Interest in Aboriginal Australians Oliver Haag , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Social Alternatives , vol. 33 no. 2 2014; (p. 18-22)
'This article examines the German translations of Jeannie Gunn's The Little Black Princess (1905) (Die kleine schwarze Prinzessin, 2010) and William Peasley's The Last of the Nomads (1982) (Die letzten Nomaden, 2007). The focus rests on the translation of Australian historical and political contexts into the foreign context of German target culture. It argues that the specifics of inter-racial Australian history evident in the two books have been rendered invisible, without the very contexts having completely disappeared. Rather, the translations have reproduced Australian racisms and German ideas of Aboriginal authenticity and traditionalism, as reflected in the notions of the harmonious Naturvolk (natural people). Both translations, the article ultimately contends, testify to the persistency of German ideas of Aboriginal Australia, construing Aboriginal people as timeless, unchanging and pre-modern.' (Publication summary)
'A Vision through the Smoky Haze' : Viewing Corroboree in Selected Australian Novels Melinda Rose Jewell , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , vol. 20 no. 1&2 2005; (p. 31-54)
"Fiction portraying the experiences of Australian Indigenous people often contains depictions of the 'corroboree'. This representation commonly conveys a scenario in which Indigenous people dance while being watched by white spectators. This establishes a relationship between seeing and knowing that locates power in the hands of the white observers. Later in this century, both non-Indigenous, then more typically Indigenous authors, deconstruct the power structures at work in these portrayals." (31)
Sisters under the Skin : Friendship : Crossing the Racial Gulf Barbara Dawson , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Crossings : Bulletin of the International Australian Studies Association , vol. 7 no. 1,2 & 3 2002; (p. 79-84)
Aboriginal Australia : A Century of Attitudinal Change John Foster , E. J. Finnis , Maureen Nimon , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Children's Literature : An Exploration of Genre and Theme 1995; (p. 35-52)
The Never Never Recreated Joan Morris , 1982 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 24 October 1982; (p. 7)
Whatever Happened to the People of We of the Never Never Helen Frizell , 1981 single work biography
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 3 January 1981;
Classics for Children Kathleen Monypenny , 1964 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 12 December vol. 86 no. 4425 1964; (p. 53)

— Review of Seven Little Australians Ethel Turner 1894 single work children's fiction ; The Magic Pudding : Being the Adventures of Bunyip Bluegum and His Friends Bill Barnacle and Sam Sawnoff Norman Lindsay 1918 single work children's fiction ; The Little Black Princess : A True Tale of Life in the Never-Never Land Mrs Aeneas Gunn 1905 single work autobiography
From My Inglenook : Gossip on Nature, Men and Books Charles Barrett , 1929 single work review
— Appears in: All About Books , 18 April vol. 1 no. 5 1929; (p. 153)
Barrett briefly reviews 'titles of special interest to collectors of Aboriginiana'.
The Little Black Princess K. Baker , 1929 single work column
— Appears in: All About Books , 18 June vol. 1 no. 7 1929; (p. 210)
Mrs Aeneas Gunn 1927 single work review
— Appears in: The Home , 1 October vol. 8 no. 10 1927; (p. 107)

— Review of We of the Never-Never Mrs Aeneas Gunn 1908 single work novel ; The Little Black Princess : A True Tale of Life in the Never-Never Land Mrs Aeneas Gunn 1905 single work autobiography
A Shelf of Women's Books Bernice May , 1926 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian Woman's Mirror , 2 March vol. 2 no. 14 1926; (p. 8, 57)
May writes of her desire to have a bookshelf full of women writers and discusses some of her favourites, both Australian and non-Australian.
Mrs. Aeneas Gunn 1922 single work review
— Appears in: The Queenslander , 15 July 1922; (p. 3)

— Review of The Little Black Princess : A True Tale of Life in the Never-Never Land Mrs Aeneas Gunn 1905 single work autobiography
A brief review of the 1922 edition (originally published in 1905) of Mrs. Gunn's work, which was produced for use in schools.
Tame Aborigines 1910 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Town and Country Journal , 12 January vol. 80 no. 2084 1910; (p. 55)

— Review of The Little Black Princess : A True Tale of Life in the Never-Never Land Mrs Aeneas Gunn 1905 single work autobiography
A Book of Gay Blackfellows Alfred George Stephens , 1906 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 11 January vol. 27 no. 1352 1906; (p. 2)

— Review of The Little Black Princess : A True Tale of Life in the Never-Never Land Mrs Aeneas Gunn 1905 single work autobiography
Mrs Aeneas Gunn 1927 single work review
— Appears in: The Home , 1 October vol. 8 no. 10 1927; (p. 107)

— Review of We of the Never-Never Mrs Aeneas Gunn 1908 single work novel ; The Little Black Princess : A True Tale of Life in the Never-Never Land Mrs Aeneas Gunn 1905 single work autobiography
Mrs. Aeneas Gunn 1922 single work review
— Appears in: The Queenslander , 15 July 1922; (p. 3)

— Review of The Little Black Princess : A True Tale of Life in the Never-Never Land Mrs Aeneas Gunn 1905 single work autobiography
A brief review of the 1922 edition (originally published in 1905) of Mrs. Gunn's work, which was produced for use in schools.
A Book of Gay Blackfellows Alfred George Stephens , 1906 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 11 January vol. 27 no. 1352 1906; (p. 2)

— Review of The Little Black Princess : A True Tale of Life in the Never-Never Land Mrs Aeneas Gunn 1905 single work autobiography
Classics for Children Kathleen Monypenny , 1964 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 12 December vol. 86 no. 4425 1964; (p. 53)

— Review of Seven Little Australians Ethel Turner 1894 single work children's fiction ; The Magic Pudding : Being the Adventures of Bunyip Bluegum and His Friends Bill Barnacle and Sam Sawnoff Norman Lindsay 1918 single work children's fiction ; The Little Black Princess : A True Tale of Life in the Never-Never Land Mrs Aeneas Gunn 1905 single work autobiography
Tame Aborigines 1910 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Town and Country Journal , 12 January vol. 80 no. 2084 1910; (p. 55)

— Review of The Little Black Princess : A True Tale of Life in the Never-Never Land Mrs Aeneas Gunn 1905 single work autobiography
From My Inglenook : Gossip on Nature, Men and Books Charles Barrett , 1929 single work review
— Appears in: All About Books , 18 April vol. 1 no. 5 1929; (p. 153)
Barrett briefly reviews 'titles of special interest to collectors of Aboriginiana'.
The Little Black Princess K. Baker , 1929 single work column
— Appears in: All About Books , 18 June vol. 1 no. 7 1929; (p. 210)
'A Vision through the Smoky Haze' : Viewing Corroboree in Selected Australian Novels Melinda Rose Jewell , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , vol. 20 no. 1&2 2005; (p. 31-54)
"Fiction portraying the experiences of Australian Indigenous people often contains depictions of the 'corroboree'. This representation commonly conveys a scenario in which Indigenous people dance while being watched by white spectators. This establishes a relationship between seeing and knowing that locates power in the hands of the white observers. Later in this century, both non-Indigenous, then more typically Indigenous authors, deconstruct the power structures at work in these portrayals." (31)
A Shelf of Women's Books Bernice May , 1926 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian Woman's Mirror , 2 March vol. 2 no. 14 1926; (p. 8, 57)
May writes of her desire to have a bookshelf full of women writers and discusses some of her favourites, both Australian and non-Australian.
Sisters under the Skin : Friendship : Crossing the Racial Gulf Barbara Dawson , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Crossings : Bulletin of the International Australian Studies Association , vol. 7 no. 1,2 & 3 2002; (p. 79-84)
Whatever Happened to the People of We of the Never Never Helen Frizell , 1981 single work biography
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 3 January 1981;
The Never Never Recreated Joan Morris , 1982 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 24 October 1982; (p. 7)
Aboriginal Australia : A Century of Attitudinal Change John Foster , E. J. Finnis , Maureen Nimon , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Children's Literature : An Exploration of Genre and Theme 1995; (p. 35-52)
Traversing the Unfamiliar : German Translations of Aboriginality in James Vance Marshall’s The Children and Phillip Gwynne’s Deadly Unna? and Nukkin Ya Leah Gerber , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 1 2014;

'The tendency for Western cultures to emphasise imperial attitudes and experiences in their literature has been described by Edward Said as the primary means by which colonised people assert their identity and the existence of their own history (xii). The tradition of Australian children’s literature, which first grew out of contributions made by European colonisers and largely ignored any indigenous past has been referred to as a “product of colonial history” (Bradford, “Representing Indigeneity” 90) and “a shamelessly racist catalogue of prejudice and misinformation, of superficial clichés, offensive stereotyping and entirely subjective interpretation” (McVitty 7). Historians Robert Hodge and Vijay Mishra use the term Aboriginalism – a variation of Said’s notion of Orientalism – to describe the way in which colonial powers traditionally constructed ideas about the colonised other within patterns of discourse, aptly masking their racist objective and appearing to function constructively (27).

'Focusing on three Australian children’s texts translated into German, this paper examines how the notion of Aboriginality – at different points in time – is presented in the source text and dealt with in translation. While consideration of the purpose – the skopos (Vermeer 1989/2004) – of the translation forming the backbone of contemporary translation theory, the so-called aims of children’s literary translation also cast an important light on the way in which translation strategies are informed. Furthering the international outlook and understanding of young readers remains the most commonly agreed-upon objective of children’s literary translation. In real terms, the execution of this aim often comes down to the decision to foreignise or domesticate. The problem, as translator Anthea Bell writes, is that “one wants readers of the translated text to feel that they are getting the real book, as close as possible to the original”, but which – vitally – includes respecting the foreign aspects of the source text (62). Yet translators of children’s literature (unlike translators of adult literature) have the added challenge of having to negotiate a variety of what Katharina Reiss calls ‘Vermittlerinstanzen’ (intermediaries): parents, teachers, librarians and publishers, who place pressure on the translator (in regards to taboos and pedagogical aspects of the text), so much so that the outcome (i.e. the target text) is affected (7).' (Publication abstract)

A Persisting Fascination : German Interest in Aboriginal Australians Oliver Haag , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Social Alternatives , vol. 33 no. 2 2014; (p. 18-22)
'This article examines the German translations of Jeannie Gunn's The Little Black Princess (1905) (Die kleine schwarze Prinzessin, 2010) and William Peasley's The Last of the Nomads (1982) (Die letzten Nomaden, 2007). The focus rests on the translation of Australian historical and political contexts into the foreign context of German target culture. It argues that the specifics of inter-racial Australian history evident in the two books have been rendered invisible, without the very contexts having completely disappeared. Rather, the translations have reproduced Australian racisms and German ideas of Aboriginal authenticity and traditionalism, as reflected in the notions of the harmonious Naturvolk (natural people). Both translations, the article ultimately contends, testify to the persistency of German ideas of Aboriginal Australia, construing Aboriginal people as timeless, unchanging and pre-modern.' (Publication summary)
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