Uncle Piper of Piper's Hill : An Australian Novel Issue Details: First known date: 1888... 1888
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Notes

  • The Pipers of Piper's Hill, later known as Uncle Piper of Piper's Hill, was serialised in the Australasian in 1888. It tells the story of the Cavendish family who come to Australia from England to live with Mrs Cavendish's parvenu brother, Tom Piper. The clash of values between the impoverished old world of privilege and the new-world democracy of the self-made man is a primary concern of the novel. Tasma's depiction of the conflicting currents of life in colonial society, and her delightful evocation of the characters involved, rapidly established her as an author of note.
  • Dedication: To my dear mother.
  • Uncle Piper of Piper's Hill: An Australian Novel was released late in 1888: 'although dated 1889, it was available for the Christmas market and some reviews appeared late in 1888'. (Patricia Clarke Tasma: The Life of Jessie Couvreur (1994, p. 114). The first edition sold out by the middle of February 1889 and the publishers produced a second edition the same year.
  • Other formats: Also e-book.

Contents

* Contents derived from the London,
c
England,
c
c
United Kingdom (UK),
c
Western Europe, Europe,
:
Sydney, New South Wales,: Pandora , 1987 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Uncle Piper of Piper's Hill : Introduction, Margaret Harris , 1987 single work criticism biography
Harris's introduction briefly describes the publication and reception of the Uncle Piper of Piper's Hill and discusses some of the themes explored in the novel. Harris demonstrates that the book was very well received by contemporary reviewers, and argues that its lack of recognition by later critics is due to the novel's subordination to texts from the Bulletin school. Uncle Piper of Piper's Hill is important, however, because of its radical treatment of the affluent bourgeois milieu in the city and its dramatization of the breakdown of English social barriers in Australia.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Serialised by: The Australasian 1864 newspaper (1091 issues)
      1888 .
      Alternative title: The Pipers of Piper's Hill
      Note/s:
      • Published in serialised format in the Australasian 7 January, 1888 - 12 May, 1888.

Works about this Work

Meta-Medievalism and the Future of the Past in the 'Australian Girl' Novel Louise D'Arcens , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October - November vol. 26 no. 3-4 2011; (p. 69-85) Australian Literary Studies , vol. 31 no. 1 2016; (p. 69-85)

'Through an examination of works by four late nineteenth-century women writers ... which explores their differing intersections with medievalism as a temporal discourse, this essay will discuss the discourse's unique capacity to probe colonial gender and colonial ideologies via its oscillation between premodernity and modernity' (p.70).

Transpacific or Transatlantic Traffic? Australian Books and American Publishers David Carter , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Across the Pacific : Australia-United States Intellectual Histories 2010; (p. 339-359)
'This paper will attempt to describe the determining factors and structural patterns of relations between Australian books and American publishers from the 19th century to the present. Its central question will be: how did 'Australian books' find their way to American publishers? Can we discern any distinctive patterns over time or for particular genres, or simply an accumulation of one-off cases? To what extent, if at all, did the traffic in Australian books depend on cultural symmetries? Did Australian books travel as Australian or British books? In what ways were they dependent upon relations between Australian (or British) publishers or literary agents and their American counterparts? What role did international copyright regimes or trade agreements play? And how might the American connection change our understanding of 'Australian literature'?' (Author's abstract)
Why Men Leave Home : The Flight of the Suburban Male in Some Popular Australian Fiction 1910-1950 Michael Sharkey , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Serious Frolic : Essays on Australian Humour 2009; (p. 110-123)
Untitled Kathryn Ferguson , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , no. 73 2002; (p. 205-206) JAS Review of Books , October no. 9 2002;

— Review of Uncle Piper of Piper's Hill : An Australian Novel Tasma 1888 single work novel
'Nervous Lady' Paints the Town Brenda Niall , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 8-9 June 2002; (p. 10)

— Review of Uncle Piper of Piper's Hill : An Australian Novel Tasma 1888 single work novel
Untitled Kathryn Ferguson , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , no. 73 2002; (p. 205-206) JAS Review of Books , October no. 9 2002;

— Review of Uncle Piper of Piper's Hill : An Australian Novel Tasma 1888 single work novel
Untitled Rodney Hall , 1969 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May vol. 8 no. 7 1969; (p. 132)

— Review of Uncle Piper of Piper's Hill : An Australian Novel Tasma 1888 single work novel
Untitled Frances Cashel Hoey , 1889 single work review
— Appears in: The Spectator , 2 February 1889; (p. 173)

— Review of Uncle Piper of Piper's Hill : An Australian Novel Tasma 1888 single work novel
Untitled A. Bell , 1969 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 5 April 1969; (p. 10)

— Review of Uncle Piper of Piper's Hill : An Australian Novel Tasma 1888 single work novel
Untitled Leonie Kramer , 1969 single work review
— Appears in: Journal of the Royal Australian Historical Society , vol. 55 no. 1969; (p. 402-404)

— Review of Uncle Piper of Piper's Hill : An Australian Novel Tasma 1888 single work novel
Why Men Leave Home : The Flight of the Suburban Male in Some Popular Australian Fiction 1910-1950 Michael Sharkey , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Serious Frolic : Essays on Australian Humour 2009; (p. 110-123)
Transpacific or Transatlantic Traffic? Australian Books and American Publishers David Carter , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Across the Pacific : Australia-United States Intellectual Histories 2010; (p. 339-359)
'This paper will attempt to describe the determining factors and structural patterns of relations between Australian books and American publishers from the 19th century to the present. Its central question will be: how did 'Australian books' find their way to American publishers? Can we discern any distinctive patterns over time or for particular genres, or simply an accumulation of one-off cases? To what extent, if at all, did the traffic in Australian books depend on cultural symmetries? Did Australian books travel as Australian or British books? In what ways were they dependent upon relations between Australian (or British) publishers or literary agents and their American counterparts? What role did international copyright regimes or trade agreements play? And how might the American connection change our understanding of 'Australian literature'?' (Author's abstract)
Tasma – A Woman Novelist of Colonial Australia – and ‘Continental Men’ Patricia A. Clancy , 2001 single work bibliography
— Appears in: Explorations : A Journal of French-Australian Connections , June no. 30 2001; (p. 21-32)
'Patricia Clancy discusses the life and work of Jesse Catherine Huybers alias Tasma, born 1848 in London who immigrated with her family to Hobart in 1852. Her first marriage to Charles Fraser was an unhappy one and became an important theme in her novels where she contrasted the spendthrift and philandering of Australian men to the sophistication of their European counterparts. After her divorce, she lived in Europe where she married the Belgian politician Auguste Couvreur. Although she never returned to Australia, her novels, which met with some success, are mostly set in the antipodes. After the death of her second husband Tasma took his place as the Brussels correspondent of the London Times until her death in 1897.' (Author's abstract)
Meta-Medievalism and the Future of the Past in the 'Australian Girl' Novel Louise D'Arcens , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October - November vol. 26 no. 3-4 2011; (p. 69-85) Australian Literary Studies , vol. 31 no. 1 2016; (p. 69-85)

'Through an examination of works by four late nineteenth-century women writers ... which explores their differing intersections with medievalism as a temporal discourse, this essay will discuss the discourse's unique capacity to probe colonial gender and colonial ideologies via its oscillation between premodernity and modernity' (p.70).

Tasma (1848-1897) Margaret Giordano , Don Norman , 1984 single work biography
— Appears in: Tasmanian Literary Landmarks 1984; (p. 51-57)
Last amended 1 Sep 2016 16:39:34
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