Girl Swinging single work   poetry   "A swing grinds on its chains."
  • Author: Judith Beveridge http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/beveridge-judith
Issue Details: First known date: 1984 1984
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Island Magazine no. 21 Summer 1984 Z597935 1984 periodical issue 1984 pg. 30
  • Appears in:
    y The Domesticity of Giraffes Judith Beveridge , Wentworth Falls : Black Lightning Press , 1987 Z364451 1987 selected work poetry Wentworth Falls : Black Lightning Press , 1987 pg. 14-15
  • Appears in:
    y Kiwi and Emu : An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry by Australian and New Zealand Women Barbara Petrie (editor), Springwood : Butterfly Books , 1989 Z242813 1989 anthology poetry Springwood : Butterfly Books , 1989 pg. 16-17
  • Appears in:
    y Motherlode : Australian Women's Poetry 1986 - 2008 Jennifer Harrison (editor), Kate Waterhouse (editor), Glebe : Puncher and Wattmann , 2009 Z1592305 2009 anthology poetry (taught in 1 units) 'Motherlode portrays the story of children and mothers from the perspective of women and their social and emotional contexts.' (The editors) Glebe : Puncher and Wattmann , 2009 pg. 154-155
  • Appears in:
    y Hook and Eye : A Selection of Poems Judith Beveridge , New York (City) : George Braziller , 2014 8769465 2014 selected work poetry

    'The third in Braziller's Series of Australian Poets, Judith Beveridge engages the world in ways that open up larger perspectives and deeper understandings. As the critic Clive James notes, Beveridge s work displays unfailing dignity of movement and quiet splendour. Whether in relation to the natural world around us or to our inner world of intellect and emotion, Beveridge s poems call us to account, exalting our capacity for knowledge and insisting upon the pleasures and responsibilities of attentiveness."' (Publication summary)

    New York (City) : George Braziller , 2014
    pg. 5-6

Works about this Work

Beyond Imagining : Notions of Transcendence in Judith Beveridge's "Between the Palace and the Bodhi Tree" Michael Heald , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Refashioning Myth : Poetic Transformations and Metamorphoses 2011; (p. 121-138)
'In his analysis of Judith Beveridge's poetry, Mike Heald contrasts poetic and philosophical engagements with Buddhism, arguing that "the imagination produces a conception of transcendence very different from that found in the meditative tradition," with the effect that in Beveridge's Siddhattha, the reader encounters "a figure who bodies forth the ineluctable suffering of the human condition, and thus the perennial elusiveness and implausibility of transcendence, rather than one who embodies the promise and indeed successful realisation of transcendence." This appears to be an occasion in which affect-driven literature diverges substantially from philosophical myth narratives, albeit in a complementary rather than a mutually exclusive manner.' (Source: Introduction p. 4)
Beyond Imagining : Notions of Transcendence in Judith Beveridge's "Between the Palace and the Bodhi Tree" Michael Heald , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Refashioning Myth : Poetic Transformations and Metamorphoses 2011; (p. 121-138)
'In his analysis of Judith Beveridge's poetry, Mike Heald contrasts poetic and philosophical engagements with Buddhism, arguing that "the imagination produces a conception of transcendence very different from that found in the meditative tradition," with the effect that in Beveridge's Siddhattha, the reader encounters "a figure who bodies forth the ineluctable suffering of the human condition, and thus the perennial elusiveness and implausibility of transcendence, rather than one who embodies the promise and indeed successful realisation of transcendence." This appears to be an occasion in which affect-driven literature diverges substantially from philosophical myth narratives, albeit in a complementary rather than a mutually exclusive manner.' (Source: Introduction p. 4)
Last amended 30 Jul 2015 12:39:54
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