Issue Details: First known date: 2013 2013
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Joyful Strains : Making Australia Home Joyful Strains : Expat Writers on Calling Australia Home Kent MacCarter (editor), Ali Lemer (editor), Mulgrave : Affirm Press , 2013 Z1897860 2013 anthology autobiography 'Joyful Strains collects twenty-seven memoirs from writers describing their expatriation to Australia. These are stories about what they found, who they became and what they now think of Australia - stories that provide entertainment, perspective and cause to celebrate our increasingly diverse nation. This is an insightful, compelling and sometimes confronting collection for all Australians. Contributors include: Alice Pung, Danny Katz, Mark Dapin and Diane Armstrong, with an introduction from Arnold Zable.' Source: http://www.affirmpress.com.au/ (Sighted 30/10/2012). Mulgrave : Affirm Press , 2013 pg. 232-242

Works about this Work

Involuntary Dissent : The Minority Voice of Translingual Life Writers Mary Besemeres , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: L2 Journal , vol. 7 no. 1 2015; (p. 18-29)

With reference to Eva Hoffman's Lost in Translation (1989) and four other texts I examine how translingual writers represent experiences of bringing what Hoffman calls 'terms from elsewhere' into dominant cultural dialogues. Alongside Hoffman's memoir I consider Bulgarian-French philosopher Tzvetan Todorov's Bilinguisme, dialogisme et schizophrenie (1985), Indian-born US writer Ginu Kamani's Code Switching (2000), Russian-born Australian journalist Irene Ulman's Playgrounds and Battlegrounds (2007) and French-Australian novelist Catherine Rey's To Make a Prairie it Takes a Clover and One Bee (2013). For all the diversity of translingual trajectories these 5 texts represent, there are conspicuous parallels between their accounts of speaking in a 'minority voice'. My focus is on experiences of involuntary dissent, a form of ambivalent group membership, which constitutes a significant and critically overlooked aspect of translingual identity. [Author's abstract]

Involuntary Dissent : The Minority Voice of Translingual Life Writers Mary Besemeres , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: L2 Journal , vol. 7 no. 1 2015; (p. 18-29)

With reference to Eva Hoffman's Lost in Translation (1989) and four other texts I examine how translingual writers represent experiences of bringing what Hoffman calls 'terms from elsewhere' into dominant cultural dialogues. Alongside Hoffman's memoir I consider Bulgarian-French philosopher Tzvetan Todorov's Bilinguisme, dialogisme et schizophrenie (1985), Indian-born US writer Ginu Kamani's Code Switching (2000), Russian-born Australian journalist Irene Ulman's Playgrounds and Battlegrounds (2007) and French-Australian novelist Catherine Rey's To Make a Prairie it Takes a Clover and One Bee (2013). For all the diversity of translingual trajectories these 5 texts represent, there are conspicuous parallels between their accounts of speaking in a 'minority voice'. My focus is on experiences of involuntary dissent, a form of ambivalent group membership, which constitutes a significant and critically overlooked aspect of translingual identity. [Author's abstract]

Last amended 25 Jan 2013 15:41:45
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