How the Reverend Joseph Simmondsen Lost His Character single work   short story   humour  
Alternative title: The Parson's Blackboy
Issue Details: First known date: 1892 1892
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Notes

  • After its first publication in the Bulletin the title was changed to 'The Parson's Blackboy'.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Alternative title: The Parson's Blackboy
Alternative title: Le Petit Nègre du Pasteur
Language: French
Notes:
Author acknowledged as Ernest Favenc.

Works about this Work

Transvestism and Colonial Narratives of Itinerancy and Settlement Elizabeth McMahon , 2000 single work criticism
— Appears in: Outskirts : Feminisms along the Edge , May vol. 6 no. 2000;
'In Australian fiction from the colonial period onward the transvestite is a recurrent figure in those rural and bush settings which function as metonyms of Australia, and onto which mythologies of distinctively Australian identities are so often invented. Transvestites continued their service of traversing rural Australia into the 1990s, mapping out spaces for identity formation in The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (1994), however this essay will focus on three narratives from the colonial period, to examine the deployment of transvestism in fiction written in the period leading up to Australian Federation in 1901. Such a focus is timely at the advent of the centenary of Federation in 2001 in its investigation of an enduring trope of white Australian identity and its relationship to the occupation and settlement of place. Examination of the operations of transvestic tropism identifies the literal fictionality of such claims by their situation in a highly conventional Romantic aesthetic and epistemology. The texts I will focus on are: Joseph Furphy's Such is Life, published in 1903 but written mostly in the 1890s, Tasma's "Monsieur Caloche" (1889), and Ernest Favenc's "The Parson's Blackboy" (1893)' (Lead paragraph).
Australia Crossed-Over : Images of Cross-Dressing in Australian Art Elizabeth McMahon , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: Art And Australia , vol. 34 no. 3 1997; (p. 372-379)
McMahon discusses the way in which 'from the early colonial period, transvestism has been deployed as a central motif or conceit in Australian visual art, photography and film, as well as in ballads, literary narratives and drama (p.374).
Oscar Wilde in Eve Langley's White Topee: The Transvestic Origins of the Australian Self Made Man Elizabeth McMahon , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , Spring vol. 56 no. 3 1996; (p. 102-114)
Australia Crossed-Over : Images of Cross-Dressing in Australian Art Elizabeth McMahon , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: Art And Australia , vol. 34 no. 3 1997; (p. 372-379)
McMahon discusses the way in which 'from the early colonial period, transvestism has been deployed as a central motif or conceit in Australian visual art, photography and film, as well as in ballads, literary narratives and drama (p.374).
Transvestism and Colonial Narratives of Itinerancy and Settlement Elizabeth McMahon , 2000 single work criticism
— Appears in: Outskirts : Feminisms along the Edge , May vol. 6 no. 2000;
'In Australian fiction from the colonial period onward the transvestite is a recurrent figure in those rural and bush settings which function as metonyms of Australia, and onto which mythologies of distinctively Australian identities are so often invented. Transvestites continued their service of traversing rural Australia into the 1990s, mapping out spaces for identity formation in The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (1994), however this essay will focus on three narratives from the colonial period, to examine the deployment of transvestism in fiction written in the period leading up to Australian Federation in 1901. Such a focus is timely at the advent of the centenary of Federation in 2001 in its investigation of an enduring trope of white Australian identity and its relationship to the occupation and settlement of place. Examination of the operations of transvestic tropism identifies the literal fictionality of such claims by their situation in a highly conventional Romantic aesthetic and epistemology. The texts I will focus on are: Joseph Furphy's Such is Life, published in 1903 but written mostly in the 1890s, Tasma's "Monsieur Caloche" (1889), and Ernest Favenc's "The Parson's Blackboy" (1893)' (Lead paragraph).
Oscar Wilde in Eve Langley's White Topee: The Transvestic Origins of the Australian Self Made Man Elizabeth McMahon , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , Spring vol. 56 no. 3 1996; (p. 102-114)
Last amended 21 Sep 2015 13:01:06
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