Pretty Dick single work   short story  
Issue Details: First known date: 1869 1869
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Story of the seven-year-old shepherd's son who gets lost in the bush and dies.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

'A Little Child Shall Lead Them' : Tasmanian and Victorian School Readers and National Growth Jane McGennisken , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , June vol. 18 no. 1 2008; (p. 5-12)

Jane McGennisken's essay looks at mythologies of Australian childhood identity and practices of 'nation-building' as evidenced in some of the stories included in the First and Second Books of the Victorian and Tasmanian Readers. First published in 1928, eight books make up the collection of fiction and non-fiction stories that became the standard reading/literacy materials used to teach English up until the 1950s.

McGennisken argues that the texts construct a particular image of the Australian child which becomes 'the central element around which ideals of Australia and Australian nationhood are constructed' (5). She claims that in both the Tasmanian and Victorian readers, 'themes of national growth negotiate bwteen innocence and knowingness, informed by the figure of the [idealized] child, selective memories and collective imagining' (5). After analysing a number of stories in detail, McGennisken concludes that the representation of children that populates the stories in the Readers serve to reinforce notions of an ideal, uniquely Australian child' that is 'inevitably a child of the bush' (10).

According to McGennisken, 'themes of national growth in the Readers' work effectively to 'displace Aboriginal Australians and their claim to the country 'with a new generation of 'natives' whose presence will endure the nations' continuing development and its white national identity' (10). In this sense, the reader's functioned within educational institutions as prescribed material that looked to 'shape future Australian citizens through the ideological production of children by text' (11).

The Westering of Quasimodo : The Legacy of the Grotesque in the New World Michael Ackland , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Departures : How Australia Reinvents Itself 2002; (p. 211-221, notes 298-299)
Examines the use of the grotesque in some Australian ("New World") writing and the way in which this differs from the European grotesque, particularly that of Victor Hugo.
Marcus Clarke's Lost Children Peter Pierce , 1999 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Country of Lost Children : An Australian Anxiety 1999; (p. 40-46)
Marcus Clark's Children's Story Victor Crittenden , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: Margin , November no. 40 1996; (p. 14-17)
"Weird Melancholy" : Inner and Outer Landscapes in Marcus Clarke's Stories Michael Wilding , 1986 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Mapped but Not Known : The Australian Landscape of the Imagination : Essays and Poems Presented to Brian Elliott LXXV 11 April 1985 1986; (p. 128-145) Studies in Classic Australian Fiction 1997; (p. 9-31)
Marcus Clarke 1931 single work essay
— Appears in: The Brisbane Courier , 1 August 1931; (p. 12)
The author discusses the criticism and praise that has been levelled at Clarke's work since his death fifty years prior.
The Prose Works of Marcus Clarke Francis Adams , 1887 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sydney Quarterly Magazine , June vol. 4 no. 2 1887; (p. 115-135)
Marcus Clark's Children's Story Victor Crittenden , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: Margin , November no. 40 1996; (p. 14-17)
Marcus Clarke 1931 single work essay
— Appears in: The Brisbane Courier , 1 August 1931; (p. 12)
The author discusses the criticism and praise that has been levelled at Clarke's work since his death fifty years prior.
'A Little Child Shall Lead Them' : Tasmanian and Victorian School Readers and National Growth Jane McGennisken , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , June vol. 18 no. 1 2008; (p. 5-12)

Jane McGennisken's essay looks at mythologies of Australian childhood identity and practices of 'nation-building' as evidenced in some of the stories included in the First and Second Books of the Victorian and Tasmanian Readers. First published in 1928, eight books make up the collection of fiction and non-fiction stories that became the standard reading/literacy materials used to teach English up until the 1950s.

McGennisken argues that the texts construct a particular image of the Australian child which becomes 'the central element around which ideals of Australia and Australian nationhood are constructed' (5). She claims that in both the Tasmanian and Victorian readers, 'themes of national growth negotiate bwteen innocence and knowingness, informed by the figure of the [idealized] child, selective memories and collective imagining' (5). After analysing a number of stories in detail, McGennisken concludes that the representation of children that populates the stories in the Readers serve to reinforce notions of an ideal, uniquely Australian child' that is 'inevitably a child of the bush' (10).

According to McGennisken, 'themes of national growth in the Readers' work effectively to 'displace Aboriginal Australians and their claim to the country 'with a new generation of 'natives' whose presence will endure the nations' continuing development and its white national identity' (10). In this sense, the reader's functioned within educational institutions as prescribed material that looked to 'shape future Australian citizens through the ideological production of children by text' (11).

The Prose Works of Marcus Clarke Francis Adams , 1887 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sydney Quarterly Magazine , June vol. 4 no. 2 1887; (p. 115-135)
"Weird Melancholy" : Inner and Outer Landscapes in Marcus Clarke's Stories Michael Wilding , 1986 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Mapped but Not Known : The Australian Landscape of the Imagination : Essays and Poems Presented to Brian Elliott LXXV 11 April 1985 1986; (p. 128-145) Studies in Classic Australian Fiction 1997; (p. 9-31)
Marcus Clarke's Lost Children Peter Pierce , 1999 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Country of Lost Children : An Australian Anxiety 1999; (p. 40-46)
The Westering of Quasimodo : The Legacy of the Grotesque in the New World Michael Ackland , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Departures : How Australia Reinvents Itself 2002; (p. 211-221, notes 298-299)
Examines the use of the grotesque in some Australian ("New World") writing and the way in which this differs from the European grotesque, particularly that of Victor Hugo.
Last amended 6 Sep 2010 13:39:47
Settings:
  • Bush,
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X