The Wanderer sequence   poetry  
Alternative title: The Wanderer : 1902-; III : The Wanderer : 1902-
Issue Details: First known date: 1913-1958 1913-1958
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Notes

  • Epigraph: Quoniam cor secretum concupivi / factus sum vagus inter stellas huius revelationis: /Atque annus peregrinationis meae /quasi annus ventorum invisibilium.
  • Poems indexed individually; many poems in the sequence have been individually published.

Includes

The Wanderer : 1902- : 99 i "The land I came thro' last was dumb with night,", Christopher Brennan , 1913-1915 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 21 January vol. 36 no. 1823 1915; (p. 2) Poetry in Australia 1923 1923; (p. 39) The Verse of Christopher Brennan 1960; (p. 165) From the Ballads to Brennan 1964; (p. 211-212) Poems [1913] 1972; (p. 191) Selected Poems 1973; (p. 107)
The Wanderer : 1902- : 88 i "I am driven everywhere from a clinging home,", Christopher Brennan , 1913-1960 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Verse of Christopher Brennan 1960; (p. 157) Poems [1913] 1972; (p. 179) Selected Poems 1973; (p. 99) The Golden Apples of the Sun : Twentieth Century Australian Poetry 1980; (p. 9) Cross-Country : A Book of Australian Verse 1984; (p. 53) Christopher Brennan 1984; (p. 85-86)
The Wanderer : 1902- : 86 i "When window-lamps had dwindled, then I rose", Christopher Brennan , 1913-1960 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Verse of Christopher Brennan 1960; (p. 156) Poems [1913] 1972; (p. 177) Selected Poems 1973; (p. 98) Australian Verse from 1805 : A Continuum 1976; (p. 95-100) The Golden Apples of the Sun : Twentieth Century Australian Poetry 1980; (p. 8) The Collins Book of Australian Poetry 1981; (p. 90)
The Wanderer : 1902- : 97 i "What is there with you and me, that I may not forget", Christopher Brennan , 1913-1960 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Verse of Christopher Brennan 1960; (p. 163) Poems [1913] 1972; (p. 189) Selected Poems 1973; (p. 105) The Golden Apples of the Sun : Twentieth Century Australian Poetry 1980; (p. 13-14) Cross-Country : A Book of Australian Verse 1984; (p. 57) Christopher Brennan 1984; (p. 91)
The Wanderer : 1902- : 96 i "Dawns of the world, how I have known you all,", Christopher Brennan , 1913-1960 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Verse of Christopher Brennan 1960; (p. 163) Poems [1913] 1972; (p. 188) Selected Poems 1973; (p. 105) The Golden Apples of the Sun : Twentieth Century Australian Poetry 1980; (p. 13) Cross-Country : A Book of Australian Verse 1984; (p. 56-57) Christopher Brennan 1984; (p. 91)
The Wanderer : 1902- : 95 i "Come out, come out, ye souls that serve, why will ye die?", Christopher Brennan , 1911 single work poetry
— Appears in: Lilley's Magazine , 1 June vol. 1 no. 1 1911; (p. 15) The Verse of Christopher Brennan 1960; (p. 162) From the Ballads to Brennan 1964; (p. 210) Poems [1913] 1972; (p. 187) Selected Poems 1973; (p. 104) The Golden Apples of the Sun : Twentieth Century Australian Poetry 1980; (p. 12-13)
The Wanderer : 1902- : 94 I Cry to You i "I cry to you as I pass your windows in the dusk;", Christopher Brennan , 1913-1960 single work poetry
— Appears in: An Anthology of Australian Verse 1952; (p. 33) The Verse of Christopher Brennan 1960; (p. 161) From the Ballads to Brennan 1964; (p. 209-210) Poems [1913] 1972; (p. 186) Selected Poems 1973; (p. 103) The Golden Apples of the Sun : Twentieth Century Australian Poetry 1980; (p. 12)
The Wanderer : 1902- : 93 i "You, at whose table I have sat, some distant eve", Christopher Brennan , 1913-1960 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Verse of Christopher Brennan 1960; (p. 160) Poems [1913] 1972; (p. 185) Selected Poems 1973; (p. 102) The Golden Apples of the Sun : Twentieth Century Australian Poetry 1980; (p. 11) Cross-Country : A Book of Australian Verse 1984; (p. 55) Christopher Brennan 1984; (p. 88-89)
The Wanderer : 1902- : 92 i "I sorrow for youth - ah, not for its wildness (would that were dead!)", Christopher Brennan , 1913-1915 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 21 January vol. 36 no. 1823 1915; (p. 2) The Verse of Christopher Brennan 1960; (p. 159) Poems [1913] 1972; (p. 183) Selected Poems 1973; (p. 101) The Golden Apples of the Sun : Twentieth Century Australian Poetry 1980; (p. 11) Cross-Country : A Book of Australian Verse 1984; (p. 54-55)
The Wanderer : 1902- : 90 i "Once I could sit by the fire hourlong when the dripping eaves", Christopher Brennan , 1913-1960 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Verse of Christopher Brennan 1960; (p. 158) Poems [1913] 1972; (p. 181) Selected Poems 1973; (p. 100) The Golden Apples of the Sun : Twentieth Century Australian Poetry 1980; (p. 10) The Collins Book of Australian Poetry 1981; (p. 91) Cross-Country : A Book of Australian Verse 1984; (p. 53-54)
The Wanderer : 1902- : 89 i "O tame heart, and why are you weary and cannot rest?", Christopher Brennan , 1913-1960 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Verse of Christopher Brennan 1960; (p. 158) Poems [1913] 1972; (p. 180) Selected Poems 1973; (p. 100) The Golden Apples of the Sun : Twentieth Century Australian Poetry 1980; (p. 9-10) Cross-Country : A Book of Australian Verse 1984; (p. 53) Christopher Brennan 1984; (p. 86)
The Wanderer : 1902- : 98 'O Desolate Eves Along the Way, How Oft' i "O Desolate eves along the way, how oft", Christopher Brennan , 1913-1927 single work poetry
— Appears in: An Australasian Anthology : Australian and New Zealand Poems 1927; (p. 179-180) Modern Poetry 1939; (p. 245-246) A Girdle of Song : By Poets of England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, Eire, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, India, South Africa, and Rhodesia 1944; (p. 18-19) An Australasian Anthology : Australian and New Zealand Poems 1946; (p. 179-180) An Anthology of Australian Verse 1952; (p. 31) Freedom on the Wallaby : Poems of the Australian People 1953; (p. 110)
The Wanderer : 1902- : 91 i "How old is my heart, how old, how old is my heart,", Christopher Brennan , 1913-1927 single work poetry
— Appears in: An Australasian Anthology : Australian and New Zealand Poems 1927; (p. 178-179) A Girdle of Song : By Poets of England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, Eire, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, India, South Africa, and Rhodesia 1944; (p. 17-18) An Australasian Anthology : Australian and New Zealand Poems 1946; (p. 178-179) An Anthology of Australian Verse 1952; (p. 28-29) A Book of Australian Verse 1956; (p. 32) The Verse of Christopher Brennan 1960; (p. 159)
The Wanderer : 1902- : 87 i "Each day I see the long ships coming into port", Christopher Brennan , 1913-1960 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Verse of Christopher Brennan 1960; (p. 157) Australian Kaleidoscope 1968; (p. 197) Poems [1913] 1972; (p. 178) Selected Poems 1973; (p. 99) The Golden Apples of the Sun : Twentieth Century Australian Poetry 1980; (p. 9) The Collins Book of Australian Poetry 1981; (p. 90-91)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

The Alpha and Omega of Brennan's The Wanderer Michael Buhagiar , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 11 no. 2 2011;
'The influence of Nietzsche's Also Sprach Zarathustra on Christopher Brennan's poem The Wanderer has been underestimated. It is especially apparent in the epigraph, and the poems (86 and 99) which open and close the sequence. The inner quest described in The Wanderer is generally held to have been a failure, but a revaluation in the light of the Nietzschean influence, incorporating a recension of the crucial poem 99, reveals a different story. The annular nature of the quest as described in the epigraph derives from Nietzsche's notion of Eternal Return , on which he confessed Zarathustra to be founded. Themes from Zarathustra dominate poem 86, and recur in poem 99. The line in the latter 'no ending of the way, no home, no goal', which has been widely interpreted as a confession of failure of the quest, is demonstrated to have been sourced from Zarathustra, where it does not bear that inference at all, but rather of triumph over doubt. The pivotal word 'withhold' in poem 99 is shown to be used in its archaic and neutral sense of 'hold within', rather than its modern sense of 'refuse to give up'. The Wanderer's quest is a success to approximately the same degree as that of Nietzsche's hero. Such clarity as to Brennan's achievement is essential if he is to attain the global reputation which many would argue he deserves.' (Author's abstract)
F.C.S. Schiller and Brennan's the Burden of Tyre Michael Buhagiar , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 71 no. 3 2011; (p. 116-129)
'Christopher Brennan composed the bulk of his fifteen-poem sequence The Burden of Tyre between August 1900 and May 1901, but it remained unpublished until Harry Chaplin's private edition of 1953. Prompted by the Boer war, which Brennan vehemently opposed, and dealing with it as an expression of philosophical principles, he had initially hoped to "sneak it in" to Poems 1913, to lie between The Forest of Night and The Wanderer. This indicates the weight it clearly carries, which is of a different order to that of the noisier and slighter The Chant of Doom (1916), Brennan's response to the First World War. G.A. Wilkes observed that on publication "It seems at once to have proved itself as inscrutable as the rest of Brennan's work". Yet only Wilkes and Mary Merewether have provided extended treatments of it, and much of it remains obscure. A close reading of his sources can solve some of the most seemingly intractable problems of Brennan scholarship, and Merewether's paper in particular is an invaluable resource in this regard. Yet she has missed the principle source of the Prologue, namely F.C.S. Schiller, whose philosophical work The Riddles of the Sphinx deeply influenced Brennan at this time; and so this most important poem of the sequence, as an overture announcing its chief themes and concerns, remains poorly understood. Wilkes felt that "[It] certainly is political poetry, but only intermittently is it anything more"; and Merewether that "The reading of The Burden of Tyre ... shows there to be few new ideas in it". The purpose of this paper is to provide a thorough exegesis of the Prologue in the light of The Riddles of the Sphinx, and to show that there are indeed new ideas in it, and ideas, moreover, which can throw light into some important aspects of Poems 1913, and into Brennan's response to one of his chief influences at the time.
A Neurotic Reading of C. J. Brennan's 'The Wanderer' John Kinsella , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Long Paddock , no. 3 2008;

The three neuroses the author sees as being pivotal to Brennan's 'Wanderer' are: 1. of fear of the dentata and the sexually "unresponsive" female and female-self; 2. of place and identification; 3. a neurosis of spiritual conviction.

The Escaping Word Chris Wallace-Crabbe , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Read It Again 2005; (p. 33-43)
The Wanderer and the Flâneur : Christopher Brennan as Modernist Peter Kirkpatrick , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 63 no. 2 2003; (p. 63-77)
In this article Kirkpatrick aims to 'resubmit Brennan's credentials as a modernist'.
Brennan and Berlin : Some Circumstances Noel Macainsh , 1989 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , March vol. 49 no. 1 1989; (p. 83-95) The Pathos of Distance 1992; (p. 62-74)
The Historical Sense and the Commonwealth Writer S. C. Harrex , 1983 single work criticism
— Appears in: The History and Historiography of Commonwealth Literature 1983; (p. 145-156)
Towards the Source of "The Wanderer" E. R. Castle , 1979 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 9 no. 2 1979; (p. 234-236)
Christopher Brennan : The Wanderer Livio Dobrez , 1978 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Poems in Perspective : A Collection of Poems and Critical Commentaries 1978; (p. 11-36)
Dobrez examines "The Wanderer" in the context of the larger Poems (1913) to demonstrate its place in the tripartite structure. Dobrez identifies several Nietzschean echoes to demonstrate that the Wanderer reflects characteristics of the ubermensch in Thus Spoke Zarathustra, where the "Higher Man" has to "open himself out to insecurity and uncertainty". Brennan's introspective poetry is remarkable, Dobrez concludes, because it was written at a time of overt nationalism, beginning a tradition that has been carried on by writers such as Patrick White and Judith Wright.
Brennan's 'Wanderer' - Some Remarks on Scansion Noel Macainsh , 1974 single work criticism
— Appears in: LiNQ , vol. 3 no. 3-4 1974; (p. 16-19)
Structure and Theme in Brennan's 'The Wanderer' Noel Macainsh , 1974 single work
— Appears in: LiNQ , vol. 3 no. 3-4 1974; (p. 24-33)
Brennan's 'The Wanderer' : A Progressive Romanticism? G. A. Wilkes , 1970 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 30 no. 4 1970; (p. 252-263)
Christopher Brennan, Poet and Scholar : A Centenary Assessment A. R. Chisholm , 1970 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin Quarterly , Spring vol. 29 no. 3 1970; (p. 276-280)
Christopher Brennan and the Idea of Eden A. R. Chisholm , 1967 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin Quarterly , Winter vol. 26 no. 2 1967; (p. 153-160)
Christopher Brennan Judith Wright , 1965 single work criticism
— Appears in: Preoccupations in Australian Poetry 1965; (p. 83-101) The Australian Nationalists : Modern Critical Essays 1971; (p. 196-214)
Wright offers a very useful introduction to Brennan's poetry, arguing that "There are few figures in literature so convincing, so deep in their conception and so towering in their realization, as Brennan's dreadful and ambiguous figure of Night".
New Perspectives on Brennan's Poetry : Conclusion G. A. Wilkes , 1953 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 14 no. 3 1953; (p. 160-171)
Wilkes summarizes his four previous essays on Poems, arguing that the semantic force of Brennan's symbols accumulates over the course of the whole cycle.
New Perspectives on Brennan's Poetry : The Unfolding of the Cycle G. A. Wilkes , 1952 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 13 no. 2 1952; (p. 86-96)
Wilkes argues that Poems has not only a single theme (a quest for Eden), but, also, a 'singleness' of form. Poems must be read as a whole: a symphonic form. Wilkes examines manuscript evidence to show how Brennan revised and rearranged the order of Poems for almost ten years before this symphonic form was produced.
The Wanderer of the Ways of All the Worlds R. G. H. , 1949 single work column
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 10 no. 4 1949; (p. 238)
Style and Form R. G. Howarth , 1949 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 10 no. 4 1949; (p. 230-232)
y Christopher Brennan : The Man and His Poetry A. R. Chisholm , Sydney : Angus and Robertson , 1946 Z532614 1946 selected work criticism
Brennan's 'Wanderer' - Some Remarks on Scansion Noel Macainsh , 1974 single work criticism
— Appears in: LiNQ , vol. 3 no. 3-4 1974; (p. 16-19)
The Wanderer and the Flâneur : Christopher Brennan as Modernist Peter Kirkpatrick , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 63 no. 2 2003; (p. 63-77)
In this article Kirkpatrick aims to 'resubmit Brennan's credentials as a modernist'.
The Escaping Word Chris Wallace-Crabbe , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Read It Again 2005; (p. 33-43)
A Neurotic Reading of C. J. Brennan's 'The Wanderer' John Kinsella , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Long Paddock , no. 3 2008;

The three neuroses the author sees as being pivotal to Brennan's 'Wanderer' are: 1. of fear of the dentata and the sexually "unresponsive" female and female-self; 2. of place and identification; 3. a neurosis of spiritual conviction.

The Alpha and Omega of Brennan's The Wanderer Michael Buhagiar , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 11 no. 2 2011;
'The influence of Nietzsche's Also Sprach Zarathustra on Christopher Brennan's poem The Wanderer has been underestimated. It is especially apparent in the epigraph, and the poems (86 and 99) which open and close the sequence. The inner quest described in The Wanderer is generally held to have been a failure, but a revaluation in the light of the Nietzschean influence, incorporating a recension of the crucial poem 99, reveals a different story. The annular nature of the quest as described in the epigraph derives from Nietzsche's notion of Eternal Return , on which he confessed Zarathustra to be founded. Themes from Zarathustra dominate poem 86, and recur in poem 99. The line in the latter 'no ending of the way, no home, no goal', which has been widely interpreted as a confession of failure of the quest, is demonstrated to have been sourced from Zarathustra, where it does not bear that inference at all, but rather of triumph over doubt. The pivotal word 'withhold' in poem 99 is shown to be used in its archaic and neutral sense of 'hold within', rather than its modern sense of 'refuse to give up'. The Wanderer's quest is a success to approximately the same degree as that of Nietzsche's hero. Such clarity as to Brennan's achievement is essential if he is to attain the global reputation which many would argue he deserves.' (Author's abstract)
F.C.S. Schiller and Brennan's the Burden of Tyre Michael Buhagiar , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 71 no. 3 2011; (p. 116-129)
'Christopher Brennan composed the bulk of his fifteen-poem sequence The Burden of Tyre between August 1900 and May 1901, but it remained unpublished until Harry Chaplin's private edition of 1953. Prompted by the Boer war, which Brennan vehemently opposed, and dealing with it as an expression of philosophical principles, he had initially hoped to "sneak it in" to Poems 1913, to lie between The Forest of Night and The Wanderer. This indicates the weight it clearly carries, which is of a different order to that of the noisier and slighter The Chant of Doom (1916), Brennan's response to the First World War. G.A. Wilkes observed that on publication "It seems at once to have proved itself as inscrutable as the rest of Brennan's work". Yet only Wilkes and Mary Merewether have provided extended treatments of it, and much of it remains obscure. A close reading of his sources can solve some of the most seemingly intractable problems of Brennan scholarship, and Merewether's paper in particular is an invaluable resource in this regard. Yet she has missed the principle source of the Prologue, namely F.C.S. Schiller, whose philosophical work The Riddles of the Sphinx deeply influenced Brennan at this time; and so this most important poem of the sequence, as an overture announcing its chief themes and concerns, remains poorly understood. Wilkes felt that "[It] certainly is political poetry, but only intermittently is it anything more"; and Merewether that "The reading of The Burden of Tyre ... shows there to be few new ideas in it". The purpose of this paper is to provide a thorough exegesis of the Prologue in the light of The Riddles of the Sphinx, and to show that there are indeed new ideas in it, and ideas, moreover, which can throw light into some important aspects of Poems 1913, and into Brennan's response to one of his chief influences at the time.
Christopher Brennan Judith Wright , 1965 single work criticism
— Appears in: Preoccupations in Australian Poetry 1965; (p. 83-101) The Australian Nationalists : Modern Critical Essays 1971; (p. 196-214)
Wright offers a very useful introduction to Brennan's poetry, arguing that "There are few figures in literature so convincing, so deep in their conception and so towering in their realization, as Brennan's dreadful and ambiguous figure of Night".
New Perspectives on Brennan's Poetry : The Unfolding of the Cycle G. A. Wilkes , 1952 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 13 no. 2 1952; (p. 86-96)
Wilkes argues that Poems has not only a single theme (a quest for Eden), but, also, a 'singleness' of form. Poems must be read as a whole: a symphonic form. Wilkes examines manuscript evidence to show how Brennan revised and rearranged the order of Poems for almost ten years before this symphonic form was produced.
New Perspectives on Brennan's Poetry : Conclusion G. A. Wilkes , 1953 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 14 no. 3 1953; (p. 160-171)
Wilkes summarizes his four previous essays on Poems, arguing that the semantic force of Brennan's symbols accumulates over the course of the whole cycle.
Brennan and Berlin : Some Circumstances Noel Macainsh , 1989 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , March vol. 49 no. 1 1989; (p. 83-95) The Pathos of Distance 1992; (p. 62-74)
Christopher Brennan : The Wanderer Livio Dobrez , 1978 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Poems in Perspective : A Collection of Poems and Critical Commentaries 1978; (p. 11-36)
Dobrez examines "The Wanderer" in the context of the larger Poems (1913) to demonstrate its place in the tripartite structure. Dobrez identifies several Nietzschean echoes to demonstrate that the Wanderer reflects characteristics of the ubermensch in Thus Spoke Zarathustra, where the "Higher Man" has to "open himself out to insecurity and uncertainty". Brennan's introspective poetry is remarkable, Dobrez concludes, because it was written at a time of overt nationalism, beginning a tradition that has been carried on by writers such as Patrick White and Judith Wright.
Brennan's 'The Wanderer' : A Progressive Romanticism? G. A. Wilkes , 1970 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 30 no. 4 1970; (p. 252-263)
Tricks of The Trade Douglas Stewart , 1944 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 4 October vol. 65 no. 3373 1944; (p. 2) The Flesh and the Spirit : An Outlook on Literature 1948; (p. 152-156)
Structure and Theme in Brennan's 'The Wanderer' Noel Macainsh , 1974 single work
— Appears in: LiNQ , vol. 3 no. 3-4 1974; (p. 24-33)
The Wanderer of the Ways of All the Worlds R. G. H. , 1949 single work column
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 10 no. 4 1949; (p. 238)
Style and Form R. G. Howarth , 1949 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 10 no. 4 1949; (p. 230-232)
Christopher Brennan, Poet and Scholar : A Centenary Assessment A. R. Chisholm , 1970 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin Quarterly , Spring vol. 29 no. 3 1970; (p. 276-280)
Christopher Brennan and the Idea of Eden A. R. Chisholm , 1967 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin Quarterly , Winter vol. 26 no. 2 1967; (p. 153-160)
Towards the Source of "The Wanderer" E. R. Castle , 1979 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 9 no. 2 1979; (p. 234-236)
The Blank Verse of `The Wanderer' Christopher Brennan , 1944 single work correspondence
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 5 no. 1 1944; (p. 16-17)
Last amended 17 Jul 2012 15:47:23
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