Hells Bells and Mademoiselles extract   autobiography   war literature  
Issue Details: First known date: 2004 2004
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Notes

  • Editor's note: Joe Maxwell was a notably devil-may-care soldier, a winner of the Victoria Cross. He worked as a journalist upon returning to civilian life, which he said he found 'prosaic' after the excitements of wartime service. Maxwell's bestselling book is an uproarious account of his experiences, from his peripheral involvement in the 'Wasser' brawl in Cairo, to the 'cold-blooded murder' of the Gallipoli fighting, to a fracas with the military police in a Picadilly cabaret. Modest about his martial achievements, Maxwell is more inclined to boast about his female conquests. here, in company with one of them, he visits the Folies Bergere in Paris on Armistice Day.
  • From chapter XIX : 'The Armistice -Paris-Delectable Respite' pp. 236-241

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y On the War-Path : An Anthology of Australian Military Travel On the Warpath : An Anthology of Australian Military Travel Robin Gerster (editor), Peter Pierce (editor), Carlton : Melbourne University Press , 2004 Z1108788 2004 anthology prose autobiography extract poetry criticism diary essay travel war literature 'This anthology reveals the many ways in which going to war has formed a cultural bridge between Australia and the world. From the Sudan in 1885 to Afghanistan in 2001, the connection of war to travel is illustrated by writers and reveals how the experience of war has both broadened and refined (and sometimes distorted) Australian views of the world.' From cover of On the War-Path : An Anthology of Australian Military Travel (2004) Carlton : Melbourne University Press , 2004 pg. 128-131
Last amended 18 Nov 2013 14:51:52
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