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Screen cap from promotional trailer
form y The Bank single work   film/TV   crime   thriller  
Issue Details: First known date: 2001 2001
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Jim Doyle (David Wenham) is hired by a major bank to perfect his mathematical discovery. He believes he can predict the stock market using chaos theory. His new boss, Simon O'Reilly (Anthony LaPaglia), gives him the biggest computer in the southern hemisphere, and then applies constant pressure. Meanwhile, a nine-year-old boy drowns himself when the bank forecloses on his family's mortgage. Grief-stricken parents Wayne (Steve Rodgers) and Diane Davis (Mandy McElhinney) bring a court action, alleging the bank failed to disclose the risks of their loan. O'Reilly tells his fixers to make the legal problem go away. Doyle's new girlfriend Michelle (Sibylla Budd) wonders if Jim has sold his soul to the devil. He wonders if she is a spy for his boss.

As Doyle perfects his computer model, he warns O'Reilly about the implications: if they can foresee a market crash, they could also act to stop it, benefiting millions. O'Reilly sees only a huge profit potential, a score to make his name. To cement Doyle's loyalty, he asks him to lie before the court, in the Davis case. The bank wins, but Doyle loses Michelle and the respect of his close colleague, Vincent (Greg Stone). Wayne Davis decides to kill the banker who killed his son, just as Doyle unleashes his computer program on the financial markets. O'Reilly discovers too late that Doyle has his own plans for the bank.' (Source: Australian Screen website)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Disrespectful Indigenisation : The Films of Robert Connolly Matthew Campora , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , December no. 69 2013;
'In this article, I will examine the work of contemporary Australian filmmaker Robert Connolly (b. 1967), a director who could be considered amongst the most successful contemporary filmmakers working in Australia today. While many of his colleagues have struggled to make their second (or even first) feature film, Connolly, in his various roles, has made a feature roughly every other year since graduating from the Australian Film Television and Radio School in the late 1990s. To date, he has written and directed four feature films, produced nearly a dozen others, worked on such quality television series as The Slap (2011), written and directed a made-for-television-movie, and produced the epic film adaptation of Tim Winton’s short story collection The Turning (2013). His track record in the contemporary industry makes him a significant case study, and as a means of introducing this analysis, I want to briefly consider Graeme Turner’s 1994 article “Whatever Happened to National Identity? Film and Nation in the 1990s” to help situate Connolly’s work in the context of Australian cinema and the narrative trends of recent decades.' (Author's Introduction)
The Bank Sarah Ward , 2012 single work essay
— Appears in: World Film Locations : Melbourne 2012; (p. 100-101)
The Boys from the Bank - The Bank Jonathan Dawson , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , September-October no. 16 2001;
The Boys from the Bank - The Bank Jonathan Dawson , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , September-October no. 16 2001;
Disrespectful Indigenisation : The Films of Robert Connolly Matthew Campora , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , December no. 69 2013;
'In this article, I will examine the work of contemporary Australian filmmaker Robert Connolly (b. 1967), a director who could be considered amongst the most successful contemporary filmmakers working in Australia today. While many of his colleagues have struggled to make their second (or even first) feature film, Connolly, in his various roles, has made a feature roughly every other year since graduating from the Australian Film Television and Radio School in the late 1990s. To date, he has written and directed four feature films, produced nearly a dozen others, worked on such quality television series as The Slap (2011), written and directed a made-for-television-movie, and produced the epic film adaptation of Tim Winton’s short story collection The Turning (2013). His track record in the contemporary industry makes him a significant case study, and as a means of introducing this analysis, I want to briefly consider Graeme Turner’s 1994 article “Whatever Happened to National Identity? Film and Nation in the 1990s” to help situate Connolly’s work in the context of Australian cinema and the narrative trends of recent decades.' (Author's Introduction)
The Bank Sarah Ward , 2012 single work essay
— Appears in: World Film Locations : Melbourne 2012; (p. 100-101)

Awards

2002 nominated Film Critics Circle of Australia Best Original Screenplay
2002 nominated Australian Film Institute Awards Best Film
2001 won AFI Awards Best Original Screenplay
2001 nominated AFI Awards Best Film
2001 nominated IF Awards Best Feature Film
2001 nominated IF Awards Best Script
Last amended 11 Mar 2015 14:40:41
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