5119176707943851635.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
1905651670219175494.jpg
Cover image courtesy of publisher.
y The Timeless Land single work   novel   historical fiction  
Is part of Timeless Land Trilogy 1941 series - author novel (number 1 in series)
Issue Details: First known date: 1941 1941
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The year 1788: the very beginning of European settlement. These were times of hardship, cruelty and danger. Above all, they were times of conflict between the Aborigines and the white settlers.

'Eleanor Dark brings alive those bitter years with moments of tenderness and conciliation amid the brutality and hostility. The cast of characters includes figures historical and fictional, black and white, convict and settler. All the while, beneath the veneer of British civilisation, lies the baffling presence of Australia, the 'timeless land'.

'The Storm of Time and No Barrier complete the Timeless Land trilogy. ' (Publication summary)

Notes

  • Dedication: For my son Michael Dark.
  • Other formats: Also braille and sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Macmillan , 1941 .
      5119176707943851635.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: ix, 499p.p.
      Note/s:
      • The UK edition has long been regarded as the first. However, it has been established that the US edition was published in September 1941, with the UK edition appearing the following month.
      • Map on endpapers.
      • Glossary on pp. 497-499.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Collins , 1941 .
      Note/s:
      • Map on endpapers.
      • Reprinted many times between 1942 and 1965 in Australia, some by Halstead Press and New Century Press.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Fontana , 1973 .
      Extent: 544p.
      ISBN: 0006132774 (pbk)
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Imprint , 1989 .
      Extent: 620p.
      ISBN: 0732225302 (pbk.)
    • Pymble, Turramurra - Pymble - St Ives area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: HarperCollins , 2002 .
      Extent: xxxi, 525pp.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Barbara Brooks and Humphrey McQueen.
      • Includes 'Glossary of Aboriginal Words and Phrases' (p.xxix-xxxi).
      ISBN: 0207198772
    • Sydney South, South Sydney area, Sydney Southern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: HarperCollins , 2013 .
      1905651670219175494.jpg
      Cover image courtesy of publisher.
      Extent: 544p.
      Note/s:
      • Published: 1st March 2013
      ISBN: 9780732296926
      Series: y A and R Classics Angus and Robertson (publisher), Z1411167 series - publisher
Alternative title: Gōshū : chōhen shōsetsu
Language: Japanese
    • Tokyo, Honshu,
      c
      Japan,
      c
      East Asia, South and East Asia, Asia,
      :
      Yūkōsha , 1942 .
      Extent: 465p.

Works about this Work

The Timeless Land : Eleanor Dark Tom Griffiths , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Art of Time Travel : Historians and Their Craft 2016; (p. 16-41)
The Intriguing Dance of History and Fiction Tom Griffiths , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: TEXT Special Issue Website Series , April no. 28 2015;
'In this essay I explore the common ground of history and fiction, suggesting that they are a tag team, sometimes taking turns, sometimes working in tandem, to deepen our understanding and extend our imagination. But I also argue that there are times when the distinction between them is vital, and that it is incumbent on historians – on those who choose at certain moments to write history – to insist and reflect on the difference. I hope to create a context in which such explanations will not be misinterpreted as defending territory. In the course of the essay I refer to historians who write fiction and novelists who write history, and I draw especially on the work of the novelists Eleanor Dark and Kate Grenville, poet and historian Judith Wright, and the historians Inga Clendinnen, Grace Karskens and Ross Gibson.' (Publication summary)
The Train from Wagga Wagga : A New Yorker en Route Jo Lennan , 2014 single work column
— Appears in: Meanjin , vol. 73 no. 1 2014; (p. 10-12)
Worlding the Island-Continent : The Spatial-Cultural Logics of Interwar Historical Fiction Adam Gall , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies of Australia , vol. 5 no. 1 2014;

The naturalisation of the Australian continent and its imaginary closure have long formed an important component of Australia’s culture of nationalism. This spatial dimension has been bound up with, but analytically separable from, figurations of Australian identity which were dependent upon imposing racialised boundaries. The culture of Australian nationalism thus depends in its formation upon exemplary instances of an “island-continental” perspective in some of its most prized narratives. This article turns to a specific moment in the cultural history of Australian nationalism—at the end of the interwar period—to examine some influential narratives that construct such a perspective. It analyses elements in two historical novels, Eleanor Dark’s The Timeless Land and Ernestine Hill’s My Love Must Wait, which appeared in 1941, as war in the Pacific loomed. By addressing Dark and Hill’s parallel projects, it will elaborate on how this nationalist spatial imaginary mediates an Australian national modernity that is also about difference and distinction from its metropolitan models. This is a project of worlding the nation, creating in narrative a meaningful background for spatial politics. These novels show us how Australian modernity finds a point of difference precisely in what Suvendrini Perera refers to as the “massivity” of the island-continent, Australia. [From the journal's website]

The Stories We Tell Angelo Loukakis , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: InCite , April vol. 34 no. 4 2013; (p. 18)
'The article offers the author's insights regarding the Australian authors. The author mentions that it is a form of cultural development reflected from the emergence of Australian authors and publishers on their effort to writ and circulate the Australians stories. The author states that one of the challenges being faced by Australian authors to circulate their stories was due to the increase of electronic books.' (Publisher's abstract)
Patrick White and the American Middlebrow : Book-of-the-Month Chooses Voss Roger Osborne , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 188-194)
A Literary Visit to the USA : A Memoir Laurie Hergenhan , 2012 single work autobiography
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 26 no. 1 2012; (p. 74-78)
Transpacific or Transatlantic Traffic? Australian Books and American Publishers David Carter , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Across the Pacific : Australia-United States Intellectual Histories 2010; (p. 339-359)
'This paper will attempt to describe the determining factors and structural patterns of relations between Australian books and American publishers from the 19th century to the present. Its central question will be: how did 'Australian books' find their way to American publishers? Can we discern any distinctive patterns over time or for particular genres, or simply an accumulation of one-off cases? To what extent, if at all, did the traffic in Australian books depend on cultural symmetries? Did Australian books travel as Australian or British books? In what ways were they dependent upon relations between Australian (or British) publishers or literary agents and their American counterparts? What role did international copyright regimes or trade agreements play? And how might the American connection change our understanding of 'Australian literature'?' (Author's abstract)
Paris and Beyond : The Transnational/National in the Writing of Christina Stead and Eleanor Dark Susan Carson , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transnational Ties : Australian Lives in the World 2009; (p. 229-244)
Susan Carson examines ways in which the Christina Stead and Eleanor Dark conceptualised transnational experiences in their fiction and negotiated the complexities of their own relationships with 'home'.
Extinction, Resistance and Rebirth : The Representation of Aboriginality in 'The Timeless Land', 'The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith' and 'Benang' Isabelle Benigno , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Fact and Fiction : Readings in Australian Literature 2008; (p. 111-120)
The Wide Brown Land : Literary Readings of Space and the Australian Continent Anthony J. Hassall , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 45-53)
'In his 1987 poem "Louvres" Les Murray speaks of journeys to 'the three quarters of our continent/set aside for mystic poetry" (2002, 239), a very different reading of Australia's inner space to A.D. Hope's 1939 vision of it as '[t]he Arabian desert of the human mind" (1966, 13) In this paper I review the opposed, contradictory ways in which the inner space of Australia has been perceived by Australian writers, and note changes in those literary perceptions, especially in the last fifty years. In that time what was routinely categerised, by Patrick White among others, as the "Dead heart" (1974, 94) - the disappointing desert encountered by nineteenth=century European explorers looking for another America -has been re-mythologised as the "Red Centre," the symbolic, living heart of the continent. What Barcroft Boake's 1897 poem hauntingly portrayed as out where the dead men lie" (140,-2) is now more commonly imagined as a site of spiritual exploration and psychic renewal, a place where Aboriginal identification with the land is respected and even shared. This change was powerfully symbolised in 1985 by the return to the traditional Anangu owners of the title deeds to the renamed Uluru, the great stone sited at the centre of the continent; but while this re-mythologising has been increasingly influential in literary readings, older, more negative constructions of that space as hostile and sterile have persisted, so that contradictory attitudes towards the inner space of Australia continue to be expressed. In reviewing a selection of those readings, I am conscious that they both distort and influence broader cultural perceptions. I am also aware that literary reconstructions of the past reflect both the attitudes of the time depicted and the current attitudes of the writer, and that separating the two is seldom simple. Finally, I am conscious of the connections between literary readings and those in art and film of the kind documented by Roslynn Hanes in her 1998 study Seeking the Centre: the Australian Desert in Literature, Art and Film, and those in television and advertising. I have however, with the exception of the Postscript, limited my paper to literary readings, with an emphasis on works published since Haynes's study.' (Author's abstract p. 45)
Story for Our Times R. Hodgman , 2006 single work correspondence
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 26 January 2006; (p. 24)
Mother Is, Like, History Nicole Moore , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Women Making Time: Contemporary Feminist Critique and Cultural Analysis 2006; (p. 172-190)
A "speculative, questioning" work "compelled by a certain conflict between history and forgetting" (p.172).
'That Critical Juncture' : Maternalism in Anti-Colonial Feminst History Nicole Moore , 2000 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , no. 66 2000; (p. 95-102)
y Eleanor Dark : A Writer's Life Barbara Brooks , Judith Clark , Sydney : Pan Macmillan Australia , 1998 Z307927 1998 single work biography
"A Hoodoo on That Book" : The Publishing Misfortunes of an Eleanor Dark Novel Drusilla Modjeska , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , Winter vol. 57 no. 2 1997; (p. 73-96)
Revising the Past / Revisioning the Future : A Postcolonial Reading of Eleanor Dark's 'The Timeless Land' Trilogy Antonio Jose Simoes Da Silva , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , December no. 10 1996; (p. 42-49)
Challenging History Making: Realism, Revolution and Utopia in The Timeless Land Brenton Doecke , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 17 no. 1 1995; (p. 49-57)
Mastering Ceremonies : The Politics of Ritual and Ceremony in Eleanor Dark, Rudy Wiebe and Mudrooroo Penny Van Toorn , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian & New Zealand Studies in Canada , December no. 12 1994; (p. 73-89)
White on Black Justin D'Ath , 1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September no. 154 1993; (p. 35-39)
Out of Australia Hassoldt Davis , 1941 single work review
— Appears in: The Nation , 4 October vol. 153 no. 14 1941; (p. 316)

— Review of The Timeless Land Eleanor Dark 1941 single work novel
As It Was Then Margaret Walkom , 1964 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 24 no. 1 1964; (p. 68-69)

— Review of No Barrier Eleanor Dark 1953 single work novel ; The Timeless Land Eleanor Dark 1941 single work novel ; Storm of Time Eleanor Dark 1948 single work novel
Redemption R. D. Charques , 1941 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 1 November no. 2074 1941; (p. 541)

— Review of The Timeless Land Eleanor Dark 1941 single work novel
Untitled M. Rugoff , 1941 single work review
— Appears in: New York Herald Tribune , 5 October 1941;

— Review of The Timeless Land Eleanor Dark 1941 single work novel
Untitled M. Rugoff , 1941 single work review
— Appears in: The New York Times Book Review , 5 October 1941;

— Review of The Timeless Land Eleanor Dark 1941 single work novel
Australia's Colonization Norah Hoult , 1941 single work review
— Appears in: John O'London's Weekly , 19 December 1941; (p. 117)

— Review of The Timeless Land Eleanor Dark 1941 single work novel
New Novels: Terra Incognita 1941 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 20 December 1941; (p. 8)

— Review of The Timeless Land Eleanor Dark 1941 single work novel
Two Historical Novels 1942 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 7 January vol. 63 no. 3230 1942; (p. 2)

— Review of The Timeless Land Eleanor Dark 1941 single work novel ; My Love Must Wait : The Story of Matthew Flinders Ernestine Hill 1941 single work novel
Untitled 1942 single work review
— Appears in: Walkabout , vol. 8 no. 8 1942; (p. 2-3)

— Review of The Timeless Land Eleanor Dark 1941 single work novel
Darkness at Dawn Stephen Murray-Smith , 1963 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September vol. 2 no. 11 1963; (p. 178)

— Review of The Timeless Land Eleanor Dark 1941 single work novel
Matrix of the Past Uther Barker , 1968 single work review
— Appears in: The Emotional Life : Literature and Art 1968; (p. 55-57)

— Review of The Timeless Land Eleanor Dark 1941 single work novel
Timeless Fiction Patricia Clarke , 1990 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 1 September 1990; (p. B9)

— Review of The Timeless Land Eleanor Dark 1941 single work novel
Story for Our Times R. Hodgman , 2006 single work correspondence
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 26 January 2006; (p. 24)
'Book News' Arranges for Exhibit J. U. , 1947 single work column
— Appears in: The Australasian Book News and Library Journal , April vol. 1 no. 10 1947; (p. 443)
Book News persuades the Department of Post War Reconstruction to include Australian literature in the Australian section of the British Empire Exhibition at the Royal Easter Show. Book News calls once more for a National Book League.
Can You Better This Book List? 1945 single work column
— Appears in: Book News , August no. [1] 1945; (p. 3)
y Understanding the Novel: The Timeless Land A. K. Thomson , Brisbane : Jacaranda Press , 1966 Z23192 1966 single work criticism
The Progress of Eleanor Dark G. A. Wilkes , 1951 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 12 no. 3 1951; (p. 139-148)
Extinction, Resistance and Rebirth : The Representation of Aboriginality in 'The Timeless Land', 'The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith' and 'Benang' Isabelle Benigno , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Fact and Fiction : Readings in Australian Literature 2008; (p. 111-120)
The Black Man and the White John McKellar , 1948 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 9 no. 2 1948; (p. 92-98)
Mother Is, Like, History Nicole Moore , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Women Making Time: Contemporary Feminist Critique and Cultural Analysis 2006; (p. 172-190)
A "speculative, questioning" work "compelled by a certain conflict between history and forgetting" (p.172).
The 'Precarious Present' and the Future : Eleanor Dark's The Timeless Land Laurie Hergenhan , 1983-1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: Unnatural Lives : Studies in Australian Fiction about the Convicts, from James Tucker to Patrick White 1993; (p. 108-121)
Aborigines as a Theme : Desert Saga, Coonardoo, Capricornia, The Timeless Land, Others. Miles Franklin , 1956 single work criticism
— Appears in: Laughter, Not for a Cage : Notes on Australian Writing, with Biographical Emphasis on the Struggles, Functions and Achievements of the Novel in Three-Half Centuries 1956; (p. 187-200)
Transpacific or Transatlantic Traffic? Australian Books and American Publishers David Carter , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Across the Pacific : Australia-United States Intellectual Histories 2010; (p. 339-359)
'This paper will attempt to describe the determining factors and structural patterns of relations between Australian books and American publishers from the 19th century to the present. Its central question will be: how did 'Australian books' find their way to American publishers? Can we discern any distinctive patterns over time or for particular genres, or simply an accumulation of one-off cases? To what extent, if at all, did the traffic in Australian books depend on cultural symmetries? Did Australian books travel as Australian or British books? In what ways were they dependent upon relations between Australian (or British) publishers or literary agents and their American counterparts? What role did international copyright regimes or trade agreements play? And how might the American connection change our understanding of 'Australian literature'?' (Author's abstract)
Aboriginal Representations in Australian Texts Vijay C. Mishra , 1987 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum: The Australian Journal of Media & Culture , vol. 2 no. 1 1987;
Paris and Beyond : The Transnational/National in the Writing of Christina Stead and Eleanor Dark Susan Carson , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transnational Ties : Australian Lives in the World 2009; (p. 229-244)
Susan Carson examines ways in which the Christina Stead and Eleanor Dark conceptualised transnational experiences in their fiction and negotiated the complexities of their own relationships with 'home'.
The Wide Brown Land : Literary Readings of Space and the Australian Continent Anthony J. Hassall , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 45-53)
'In his 1987 poem "Louvres" Les Murray speaks of journeys to 'the three quarters of our continent/set aside for mystic poetry" (2002, 239), a very different reading of Australia's inner space to A.D. Hope's 1939 vision of it as '[t]he Arabian desert of the human mind" (1966, 13) In this paper I review the opposed, contradictory ways in which the inner space of Australia has been perceived by Australian writers, and note changes in those literary perceptions, especially in the last fifty years. In that time what was routinely categerised, by Patrick White among others, as the "Dead heart" (1974, 94) - the disappointing desert encountered by nineteenth=century European explorers looking for another America -has been re-mythologised as the "Red Centre," the symbolic, living heart of the continent. What Barcroft Boake's 1897 poem hauntingly portrayed as out where the dead men lie" (140,-2) is now more commonly imagined as a site of spiritual exploration and psychic renewal, a place where Aboriginal identification with the land is respected and even shared. This change was powerfully symbolised in 1985 by the return to the traditional Anangu owners of the title deeds to the renamed Uluru, the great stone sited at the centre of the continent; but while this re-mythologising has been increasingly influential in literary readings, older, more negative constructions of that space as hostile and sterile have persisted, so that contradictory attitudes towards the inner space of Australia continue to be expressed. In reviewing a selection of those readings, I am conscious that they both distort and influence broader cultural perceptions. I am also aware that literary reconstructions of the past reflect both the attitudes of the time depicted and the current attitudes of the writer, and that separating the two is seldom simple. Finally, I am conscious of the connections between literary readings and those in art and film of the kind documented by Roslynn Hanes in her 1998 study Seeking the Centre: the Australian Desert in Literature, Art and Film, and those in television and advertising. I have however, with the exception of the Postscript, limited my paper to literary readings, with an emphasis on works published since Haynes's study.' (Author's abstract p. 45)
A Literary Visit to the USA : A Memoir Laurie Hergenhan , 2012 single work autobiography
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 26 no. 1 2012; (p. 74-78)
The Stories We Tell Angelo Loukakis , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: InCite , April vol. 34 no. 4 2013; (p. 18)
'The article offers the author's insights regarding the Australian authors. The author mentions that it is a form of cultural development reflected from the emergence of Australian authors and publishers on their effort to writ and circulate the Australians stories. The author states that one of the challenges being faced by Australian authors to circulate their stories was due to the increase of electronic books.' (Publisher's abstract)
Dazzling Writing : Introduction to the Virago Version of Eleanor Dark's Lantana Lane Helen Garner , 1959-1986 single work criticism
— Appears in: Lantana Lane 1986; Eight Voices of the Eighties : Stories, Journalism and Criticism by Australian Women Writers 1989; (p. 376-382)
Mastering Ceremonies : The Politics of Ritual and Ceremony in Eleanor Dark, Rudy Wiebe and Mudrooroo Penny Van Toorn , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian & New Zealand Studies in Canada , December no. 12 1994; (p. 73-89)
The Timeless Eleanor Dark Helen O'Reilly , 1989 single work biography
— Appears in: Outrider : A Journal of Multicultural Literature in Australia , June vol. 6 no. 1 1989; (p. 42-47)
A Tribute to Eleanor Dark John Apthorp , 1988 single work biography
— Appears in: Friends of Varuna (The Eleanor Dark Foundation) Newsletter , July no. 1 1988; (p. 3)
Last amended 16 Jul 2015 09:50:23
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