Issue Details: First known date: 1994 1994
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Arden, a former staff writer for National Geographic magazine and the coauthor of Wisdomkeepers: Meetings with Native American Spiritual Elders (Beyond Words, 1991), focuses upon the Aboriginal cultures of the Kimberley region of northwestern Australia. Writing in an anecdotal style, he chronicles his journey throughout the area and his meetings and interviews with a variety of Aboriginal people - political leaders, spiritual elders, creative artists, and ordinary individuals ... Arden allows the Aboriginal people to speak for themselves - sharing their concerns, thoughts, and ideas exactly as they were spoken to him' (Library Journal).

Notes

  • Dedication: This book is dedicated to the Aboriiginal peoples of Australia, to Aboriginal peoples everywhere, and to the Aboriginal in each of us.
  • Epigraph: Hear; you mob!
    I'm an Aboriginal.
    I'm and Australian.
    I'm a Miriwoong.
    We're all one family,
    All together;
    We human beings.
    All one big mob! (Ted Carlton, Miriwoong)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      HarperCollins , 1994 .
      Extent: xii, 219 p., [17] p. of platesp.
      Description: illus. (some col.); maps; ports
      Note/s:
      • Photographs by Harvey Arden and Mike Osborn.
      ISBN: 0060169168

Works about this Work

'New Age Trippers': Aboriginality and Australian New Age Travel Books Robert Clarke , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Travel Writing , vol. 13 no. 1 2009; (p. 27-43)
In the last two decades of the twentieth century Australia became an attractive travel destination for alienated middle-class Westerners in search of a spiritual utopia. In such texts Aboriginality is represented as a source of spiritual transcendence and as a remedy for the evils of modern consumerism and industrialisation. This article examines a number of books by white New Age spiritual travellers-James Cowan's Two Men Dreaming (1995), Marlo Morgan's Mutant Message Down Under (1994), and Harvey Arden's Dreamkeepers (1995) - that claim to (re)discover a lost, universal, sacred heritage within Aboriginal cosmologies. The discourses employed by recent Australian New Age travel texts are prima facie examples of postcolonial forms of cultural appropriation. Yet the involvement of indigenous agents in the production, promotion, and critique of such texts complicates the argument that these texts are simply new forms of cultural colonisation (Author's abstract).
'New Age Trippers': Aboriginality and Australian New Age Travel Books Robert Clarke , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Travel Writing , vol. 13 no. 1 2009; (p. 27-43)
In the last two decades of the twentieth century Australia became an attractive travel destination for alienated middle-class Westerners in search of a spiritual utopia. In such texts Aboriginality is represented as a source of spiritual transcendence and as a remedy for the evils of modern consumerism and industrialisation. This article examines a number of books by white New Age spiritual travellers-James Cowan's Two Men Dreaming (1995), Marlo Morgan's Mutant Message Down Under (1994), and Harvey Arden's Dreamkeepers (1995) - that claim to (re)discover a lost, universal, sacred heritage within Aboriginal cosmologies. The discourses employed by recent Australian New Age travel texts are prima facie examples of postcolonial forms of cultural appropriation. Yet the involvement of indigenous agents in the production, promotion, and critique of such texts complicates the argument that these texts are simply new forms of cultural colonisation (Author's abstract).
Last amended 27 Jun 2011 14:21:46
Subjects:
  • Kimberley area, North Western Australia, Western Australia,
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